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God Willin' & The Creek Don't Rise

August 17, 2010 | Format: MP3

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Digital Booklet: God Willin' & The Creek Don't Rise
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 16, 2010
  • Release Date: August 17, 2010
  • Label: RCA Records Label
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 44:26
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003YOWU1Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (200 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,333 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Rudy Palma on August 17, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Letting Ray LaMontagne transport you has never been easier, and new LP "God Willin' & the Creek Don't Rise" is the reason why. His fourth album release - and the first to have him billed in a band context with the excellent Pariah Dogs - sounds rich, organic and sincere.

From the first song to the last the album sounds like the kind of live concert one might stumble upon during a night of bar hopping and count himself especially lucky for having chanced upon.

Things are a little changed this time around. The band is front and center in its support of LaMontagne, justifying their co-billing. Furthermore, he has taken over the production helm from Ethan Johns, taking more control over the final product. The result is sonic textures even more mellowed and marinated than before, allowing the songs maximum ability to catch hold and wield an impression upon the listener.

Even if LaMontagne hits upon a cliched phrases or idea here and there ("New York City's Bringing Me Down") it does not detract.

In fact, his directness and lack of pretense result in his themes - among them heartbreak ("This Love Is Over"), self-preservation ("Repo Man") and breaking free from convention (the husky, awesome "Beg Steal or Borrow") - coming off with ease and precisely-chiseled grace. This results in a set of a songs that are arresting at first listen.

A particular highlight is the sublime, catchy, profoundly beautiful "Old Before Your Time," which has such melodic panache it recalls heyday Elton John and Don McLean. It acknowledges the bittersweet reality of the examined life yet remains optimistic and soothing, one of LaMontagne's specialties. The same can be said of "For the Summer," which features awesome instrumental breaks.

LaMontagne has grown remarkably for an artist only on his fourth studio record. "God Willin' & the Creek Don't Rise" is sure to please fans and earn many converts.
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Blue in CT on August 17, 2010
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
A genuinely haunting and hypnotic journey. The lyrics tell stories perfectly matched to the unique voice and subtle instruments. Don't be fooled by the peaceful appearance - these are genuine stories of loss, desire and heartbreak. The interplay of the steel guitar is the unifying thread throughout. Maybe not the genius of "Nashville Skyline", but reminiscent. A highly recommended interlude. Don't cheat yourself by trying to pick individual songs - buy the whole disc.
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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By R.L. Hale on August 17, 2010
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
With the exception of "Live from Bonnaroo" I own every album Ray has out, including "Introducing Raycharles LaMontagne", (1999) "Acre of Land",(2001) "Green",(2002) and "One Lonesome Saddle",(2002). In my opinion, this is the BEST album Ray has ever released. From the opening song, "Repo Man" through the closing of "Devil's In The Jukebox", you'll be tapping your toes and singing right along - whether it be on your ride to work, or that road trip you've been planning. It's worth mentioning Ray's husky, smoke and whiskey, voice isn't as present on this album. Instead his voice rings clear and bright on the majority of the tracks.

I heartily agree with the Associated Press in saying God Willing And The Creek Don't Rise is, "one of the year's best!"
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By listen_er on January 31, 2011
Format: Audio CD
I am not what one would consider a Ray Lamontagne fan, but rather someone who is familiar with his style and his more notable songs. After hearing this album, I felt sick knowing that this music existed out there for four months without me knowing it.

In music, I like a lot of things, but find myself the most enamored and blown away by what I consider the entirety of the sound. It's the combination of everything....emotion, voice, musical phrasing, accompaniment, pace and organization of a song or album to produce something greater than the sum of its parts. This album delivers this in spades. From the bare bones and visceral "Are We Really Through" to the smoky soul swagger in "Repo Man" you will experience a variety of sounds that definitely lean a bit more to the alt-country side than his prior albums.

His use of Eric Heywood and Greg Leisz brings a boatload of credibility to this album. Leisz played for John Fogerty, Joni Mitchell, The Eagles, Beck, Wilco, Avenged Sevenfold, Smashing Pumpkins, Bruce Cockburn, Lucinda Williams, Alison Krauss & Robert Plant. Heywood started with The Jayhawks and Sun Volt. Both are fantastic.

I am typically not one to press my musical tastes upon others, but I cannot stop telling people about this album. It is that good. It is worth your time.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Nse Ette TOP 1000 REVIEWER on August 17, 2010
Format: Audio CD
"God willin' & the creek don't rise" is Ray Lamontagne's fourth album. It continues in the Folky Alt Country vein of its predecessor "Gossip in the grain" but largely without the psychedelic flourishes of that album but this time with a few friends comprising The Pariah Dogs.

The album comprises 10 tracks and opens with the retro Funk "Repo man" which wouldn't sound out of place on a James Brown album. The Country ballad "New York City's killing me" is wistful while the title track cranks up the melancholic factor even more.

Other standouts are the acoustic "Are we really through", the denser "For the summer", the more rocking Blues of "The devil's in the jukebox", and my favourite, the tremulous heartfelt acoustic "This love is over" perfectly showcasing his grainy croon as he sings in a vulnerable whisper. Truly spectacular!
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