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Godforsaken: Bad Things Happen. Is there a God who cares? Yes. Here's proof. Hardcover – February 17, 2012

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

In 2010, Dinesh D'Souza was named the president of The King's College, a Christian college located in the Empire State Building in New York City. The mission of The King's College is to transform society by preparing students for careers in which they help to shape and eventually to lead strategic public and private institutions. D'Souza brought to The King's College a distinguished 25-year career as a writer, scholar, and public intellectual. A former policy analyst in the Reagan White House, D'Souza also served as John M. Olin Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Called one of the top young public-policy makers in the country by Investor's Business Daily, D'Souza quickly became known as a major influencer on public policy through his writings. His first book, Illiberal Education (1991), publicized the phenomenon of political correctness in America's colleges and universities and became a New York Times bestseller for 15 weeks. It has been listed as one of the most influential books of the 1990s. In 1995, D'Souza published The End of Racism, which became one of the most controversial books of the time and another national bestseller. His 1997 book, Ronald Reagan: How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader, was the first book to make the case for Reagan's intellectual and political importance. D'Souza's The Virtue of Prosperity: Finding Values in an Age of Techno Affluence (2000) explored the social and moral implications of wealth. In 2002, D'Souza published his New York Times bestseller What's So Great About America, which was critically acclaimed for its thoughtful patriotism. His 2003 book Letters to a Young Conservative has become a handbook for a new generation of young conservatives inspired by D'Souza's style and ideas. The Enemy at Home published in 2006, stirred up a furious debate both on the left and the right. It became a national bestseller and was published in paperback in 2008, with a new Afterword by the author responding to his critics. Just as in his early years D'Souza was one of the nation's most articulate spokesmen for a reasoned and thoughtful conservatism, so in recent years he has been an equally brilliant and forceful defender of Christianity. What's So Great About Christianity not only intelligently explained the core doctrines of the Christian faith, it also explained how the freedom and prosperity associated with Western Civilization rest upon the foundation of biblical Christianity. Life After Death: The Evidence shows why the atheist critique of immortality is irrational and draws the striking conclusion that it is reasonable to believe in life after death. His most recent book The Roots of Obama's Rage (Regnery, 2010) has been described as the most influential political book of the year and has proven to be yet another best seller. These books--not to mention a razor-sharp wit and entertaining style--have allowed D'Souza to participate in highly-publicized debates about Christianity with some of the most famous atheists and skeptics of our time. One of D'Souza's favorite venues for debates and speeches has been college campuses. During the past 20 years, he has appeared at hundreds of colleges and universities, and has spoken with hundreds of thousands of students in these live settings. In recent years he has taken on the New Atheists such as Christopher Hitchens, Peter Singer and Michael Shermer. Born in Mumbai, India, D'Souza came to U.S. as an exchange student and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Dartmouth College in 1983. D'Souza has been named one of America's most influential conservative thinkers by the New York Times Magazine. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.; Reprint edition (February 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414324855
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414324852
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 5.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (113 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #121,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dinesh D'Souza has had a 25-year career as a writer, scholar, and public intellectual. A former policy analyst in the Reagan White House, D'Souza also served as John M. Olin Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He served as the president of The King's College in New York City from 2010 to 2012.

Called one of the "top young public-policy makers in the country" by Investor's Business Daily, D'Souza quickly became known as a major influencer on public policy through his writings. His first book, Illiberal Education (1991), publicized the phenomenon of political correctness in America's colleges and universities and became a New York Times bestseller for 15 weeks. It has been listed as one of the most influential books of the 1990s.

In 1995, D'Souza published The End of Racism, which became one of the most controversial books of the time and another national bestseller. His 1997 book, Ronald Reagan: How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader, was the first book to make the case for Reagan's intellectual and political importance. D'Souza's The Virtue of Prosperity (2000) explored the social and moral implications of wealth.

In 2002, D'Souza published his New York Times bestseller What's So Great About America, which was critically acclaimed for its thoughtful patriotism. His 2003 book, Letters to a Young Conservative, has become a handbook for a new generation of young conservatives inspired by D'Souza's style and ideas. The Enemy at Home, published in 2006, stirred up a furious debate both on the left and the right. It became a national bestseller and was published in paperback in 2008, with a new afterword by the author responding to his critics.

Just as in his early years D'Souza was one of the nation's most articulate spokesmen for a reasoned and thoughtful conservatism, in recent years he has been an equally brilliant and forceful defender of Christianity. What's So Great About Christianity not only intelligently explained the core doctrines of the Christian faith, it also explained how the freedom and prosperity associated with Western Civilization rest upon the foundation of biblical Christianity. Life After Death: The Evidence shows why the atheist critique of immortality is irrational and draws the striking conclusion that it is reasonable to believe in life after death.

In 2010, D'Souza wrote The Roots of Obama's Rage (Regnery), which was described as the most influential political book of the year and proved to be yet another best seller.

In 2012, D'Souza published two books, Godforsaken and Obama's America: Unmaking the American Dream, the latter climbing to #1 on the New York Times bestseller list and inspiring a documentary on the same topic. The film, called "2016: Obama's America," has risen to the second-highest all-time political documentary, passing Michael Moore's Sicko and Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth. In addition, 2016 has risen to #4 on the bestselling list of all documentaries.

These endeavors--not to mention a razor-sharp wit and entertaining style--have allowed D'Souza to participate in highly-publicized debates about Christianity with some of the most famous atheists and skeptics of our time.

Born in Mumbai, India, D'Souza came to the U.S. as an exchange student and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Dartmouth College in 1983.

D'Souza has been named one of America's most influential conservative thinkers by the New York Times Magazine. The World Affairs Council lists him as one of the nation's 500 leading authorities on international issues, and Newsweek cited him as one of the country's most prominent Asian-Americans.

D'Souza's articles have appeared in virtually every major magazine and newspaper, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic Monthly, Vanity Fair, New Republic, and National Review. He has appeared on numerous television programs, including the The Today Show, Nightline, The News Hour on PBS, The O'Reilly Factor, Moneyline, Hannity, Bill Maher, NPR's All Things Considered, CNBC's Kudlow Report, Lou Dobbs Tonight, and Real Time with Bill Maher.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

137 of 150 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Greene VINE VOICE on February 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dinesh D'Souza claims that the motivation behind much of atheism is not from a genuine disbelief in a god, rather it is an anger and bewilderment stemming from an inability to reconcile the simultaneous existence of an allegedly all-powerful and all-loving God along with the presence of evil and suffering in the world. Atheists argue that such a god must be impotent, cruel or likely non-existent. Drawing from cultural anthropology, science, theology, and philosophy, D'Souza attempts to refute these claims by providing an explanation for the possibility of the coexistence of both suffering and the omnipotent God.

D'Souza begins by discussing how suffering is viewed in different cultures, traditions and religions. He points out that people in third world countries struggle with suffering much more so than people in western nations, yet religious faith abounds for the former and is in decline for the latter. He believes this may be due to how prosperity gives one the sense that they are self-sufficient; yet poor people feel compelled to depend on a higher power. D'Souza introduces this idea to later suggest that suffering's purpose may be to draw people into a closer relationship with God. Perhaps, but why is suffering possible and permissible with an omnipotent, all loving God; and if God wants a relationship, are there not other ways to do it without suffering? D'Souza delivers answers to these questions.

Much of D'Souza's arguments rest on two important ideas: the scientific concept of the anthropic principle; and the limits of omnipotence. The anthropic principle is the notion that the universe, given its vastness, immensity, age, and complexity is perfect, finely tuned and all exactly necessary for the existence of moral beings called humans.
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53 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Burkett on May 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The constant debate between Christians and Atheists seems to always to orbit around the problem of a benevolent God with the reality of a broken, evil world. While this struggle has been going on for centuries, D'Souza brings some fresh perspective to the table, invoking modern day science as proof for theism. At first blush, this may seem counterintuitive, but D'Souza's arguments are balanced and compelling. These insights would have inspired a 5 star review from me, that is, until I got to the last chapter of the book which talked about the afterlife. Here, D'Souza completely drops his logic utilized in the first 90% of his book and goes with a typical Evangelical pat answer. There is a tremendous amount of good in this book that should be praised. With that being said, there is some ugly in this book that needs to be addressed.

The Good
The biggest issue in defending the Christian faith is the problem of theodicy. Why did an all loving, all powerful creator make a world with so much pain and evil? This is typically the biggest arguing point from atheists and their concerns are legitimate. Yet D'Souza fearlessly tackles these concerns using empirical evidence from modern sciences like Astronomy, Biology and Geology. Many of his arguments are nothing incredibly new - he employs many of the typical free will defense logics and things like the anthropic view of the Universe in his case. However, while many of his arguments are often used to defend the existence of God, he uses them in a way to reconcile the problems between an all loving God and a suffering world. In modern Christianity, where tragedy and suffering is gratuitously met with the pat answer of, "it was God's will", D'Souza's wonderful perspective is badly needed.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Renn S on July 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For a lot of people, the biggest question about God is not, surprisingly enough, whether he exists. Instead, it is about whether God is truly good. Dinesh D'Souza, in his debates with leading atheists, quickly realized that many of those debates revolved around the question of evil in this world--how God could create a world that allowed such suffering and evil. In Godforsaken, Dinesh D'Souza takes these questions head on: Does God act like a tyrant? Is God really responsible for the evil in this world? Why is there suffering in the world? For the first time ever, Dinesh D'Souza approaches this topic with historical and scientific proof and presents to the reader why God is truly worthy of our worship and love.

Godforsaken was a carefully researched book that really spoke to both the intellectual and emotional side of any person, Christian or otherwise. Dinesh D'Souza broke his book into six parts. The first part is an introduction to the reality of suffering in this world and how all people groups everywhere at some point both experience and struggle with suffering and evil. The second part quickly yet thoroughly analyzes the typical Christian and atheist both approach the conundrum of how a good God can exist and yet the reality that there is evil and suffering in this world. This part also shows how each Christian and atheist argument is flawed and cannot truly satisfy people's questions about evil and suffering. The third part addresses the moral evils that exist in this world as pertains to both people's free will, God's sovereignty, and the consequences of a fallen world. The fourth part of Godforsaken looks at the crimes that occur in nature and how those relate to the power and character of God.
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