Buy New
$28.68
Qty:1
  • List Price: $31.99
  • Save: $3.31 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $12.91
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

God's Caliph: Religious Authority in the First Centuries of Islam (University of Cambridge Oriental Publications) Paperback – September 18, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0521541114 ISBN-10: 0521862167 Edition: Reprint

Buy New
Price: $28.68
26 New from $28.68 12 Used from $30.41
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2,156.33
Paperback
"Please retry"
$28.68
$28.68 $30.41
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

God's Caliph: Religious Authority in the First Centuries of Islam (University of Cambridge Oriental Publications) + God's Rule - Government and Islam: Six Centuries of Medieval Islamic Political Thought
Price for both: $56.08

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Series: University of Cambridge Oriental Publications (Book 37)
  • Paperback: 164 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Reprint edition (September 18, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521862167
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521541114
  • ASIN: 0521541115
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #277,510 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

This study examines how religious authority was distributed in early Islam. It argues the case that, as in Shi'ism, it was concentrated in the head of state, rather than dispersed among learned laymen as in Sunnism.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Tron Honto on April 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a classic investigation into the nature of the most archaic form of Islamic polity. Though highly controversial, it is nonetheless a classic in the field.
The thesis set forth by Crone and Hinds can be succinctly stated thus: the Imamī/Shicī view of the caliphate is an archaism rather than an innovation as suggested by previous scholarship, which characterized the early Umayyad Caliphs as largely politically minded and irreligious.
Crone and Hinds spread out an examination of the early usages of the title khalīfat Allāh, i.e., `deputy of God', as the foundation of their case. After a sweeping overview of the known Umayyad attestations and attributions of the title and elsewhere, they forcefully argue for the official status of the title khalīfat Allāh for the Umayyad head of state. This contradicts the claim of majority tendency of the `ulamā' to claim that caliphal title was merely khalīfat rusūl Allāh, or, `successor/deputy of God's messenger'. The following are the three points which are seen to provide sufficient reason to reject of account of the `ulamā': 1) those who reject the title khalīfat Allāh are Abu Bakr, `Umar, `Umar II, and other `ulamā'-i.e., the religious scholars and their favorite "mouthpieces"; 2) the title khalīfat rusūl Allāh appears in an explicitly polemical context vis à vis the title khalīfat Allāh; 3) if the original meaning of `Caliph' was merely `successor to God's prophet', then why did the title khalīfat rusūl Allāh disappear only to reappear in the `Abbāssid era?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Reid Ross on November 5, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book has given us the Umayyad definition of "the caliphate". This turns out to be pretty much the same as the early 'Abbasid definition, and it remains the Shi'a definition - "God's viceroy". Tron Honto's review has covered the main points, so I'll just add a few addenda here.

The arguments in this book weren't exactly new; Crone and Hinds admit a debt to Emile Tyan's work during the 1950s, and of course many Muslims themselves had been making that same point through history. But it seems that scholarly consensus from the 1950s to the 80s had not yet come to terms with Tyan. This book brought home Tyan's point to English-speaking scholars, and changed the consensus to such a degree that... it's no longer so easy even to find copies of Tyan's book.

On that topic by the way, I must cavil that, since we mere mortals can't get Tyan, it's not helpful of this book to refer to Tyan where there were primary sources involved. For instance: This book claims that 'Umar called himself God's Sultan. For that, the primary source is Ibn Sa'd. This book pointed to Tyan. It *should* have pointed to Ibn Sa'd, with "apud Tyan" for good manners. So, that feature was annoying.

(There have also been some comments - well, I saw the one comment, from Madelung in his 1997 "Succession to Muhammad" - that Abu Bakr might have called himself "the Prophet's caliph" and not "God's" after all. But I'm not yet sure I buy that. The pre-Siffin era is enough of a black hole; pre-`Umar is well-nigh unfathomable.)

The book makes up for that by pointing to plenty of primary sources of POETRY, notably Farazdaq, who was about the biggest Umayyad suckup outside al-Zuhri. Scholars will have a lot of fun turning over the gems in the footnotes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Roshan on February 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is a great book of late early (i.e. later than the 'righteously guided caliphs') religious and political authority amongst the early Muslims.

What it conclusively shows is that previous generations of Muslims had not placed such emphasis on the persona of 'Muhammad'. It shows that the early caliphs shared both political and religious authority within the early Muslim (?Islamic) empire. Coinage issued at the time mentioned God's name, not Muhammad or the alleged 'shahadah' (ridiculed in the Quran 63:1).

As time went on, disputes increasingly arose over the nature of succession. Instead of ruling by mutual consent (42:38) they started using the name of 'Muhammad' in vain and magical 'statements of hadith' which just happened to back up each individuals claim to power happened to be found by each grouping.

Furthermore, the author conclusively shows (through written testimony) how many of the late early caliphs considered themselves almost above Muhammad.

However, the 'scholars' or clerical class eventually came to rule supreme over this new body of Muslim law and the split between religious and political authority was made.

This book presents the evidences first hand, rather than history books that choose not to and just provide a commentary. It is well worth the read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Glogg Rene on April 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very interesting and based on the different available information which is sifted according to possible influences of time and ideology. Due to limited information and the establishment of "the true history of Islam" - having only limited similarity with what really happened - Crone is trying to establish the real development.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search