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Godslayer: Volume II of The Sundering Mass Market Paperback – June 27, 2006


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Godslayer: Volume II of The Sundering + Naamah's Kiss (Kushiel Legacy)
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Product Details

  • Series: The Sundering (Book 2)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Fantasy (June 27, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076535098X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765350985
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 4.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #601,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Lord Satoris Banewreaker has the best of intentions when he opposes Haomane, his brother god, but his actions sunder the world of Urulat. Carey's complex Sundering fantasy series, of which this follows 2004's Banewreaker, challenges the reader more than her well-received Kushiel trilogy (Kushiel's Dart, etc.). The stately pace, the plethora of names and sentient species (of which Man is only one) and the difficult main characters—cold, dignified gods—will put off some fans of the earlier, more accessible series. In addition, the author owes too obvious a debt to Tolkien: hobbitlike folk bear powerful, mystical objects analogous to Frodo's ring, while the ethereally beautiful Cerelinde could have been lifted bodily from Loth Lorien. On the other hand, a figure like Tanaros, who retains his honor by slaying his wife and king for betraying him, shows Carey can still create strong, original characters, and the climax, when gods and men fall in battle like ninepins, not only nicely ties everything up but is quite moving as well.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Urulat is in a bad way. With a final prophecy unfolding, the races have united to bring down the evil Satoris. But the key to the prophecy's fulfillment, the elvish princess Cerelinde, is Satoris' captive. His supporters want her dead. He lets her live because she reminds him of his former goodness. And he sits in Darkhaven, his fortress, mourning his considerable losses and slowly going mad. Lord Tanaros, Satoris' first in command, has also lost much, and grief and rage have hardened a wall around his heart. Yet Cerelinde has somehow touched him. For both men, she is the seed of redemption at the heart of perilous choices that will determine the fate of Urulat. Still, there is a wild card in the person of the Bearer, a resourceful young boy charged with bringing the precious water of life to Darkhaven. Darkhaven's deadly trolls have his scent, though, and they always get their prey. The sequel to Banewrecker (2004) is vintage Carey, though some may fast-forward through the more elaborately embroidered passages. Paula Luedtke
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Jacqueline Carey is the author of the New York Times bestselling Kushiel's Legacy series of historical fantasy novels, The Sundering epic fantasy duology, postmodern fables "Santa Olivia" and "Saints Astray," and the Agent of Hel contemporary fantasy series. Carey lives in west Michigan. Although often asked by inquiring fans, she does not, in fact, have any tattoos.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Katherine Innis on April 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I, like others here, found Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel series a wonderful breath of fresh air in a rather stale fantasy market. So, I, like others here, was excited beyond belief to find The Sundering books. I read both one after another about six months ago. I finished not knowing really what I thought. These books are so different, formal and epic, where Kushiel's are personal and enganging. I was sad and drained; I let a friend borrow them with a warning that they were "dark". She didn't read them and I found myself disappointed because I wanted to talk with someone about the books. As time passed I found myself thinking again about the books, the characters, trying to figure out how it could have gone differently, and wondering what will happen now in the world Ms. Carey has created. Kushiel remains in my mind as a terrific story with amazing characters, settings and it was fun, but The Sundering is what I keep thinking about and want more of.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By V. Chan on January 31, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This isn't, as some have described it, "The Lord of the Rings" told from Sauron's viewpoint. It's "The Lord of the Rings" set in a non-Christian, non-dualist world, where good and evil are secondary constructs, not fundamental conditions of the universe. The tragedy comes from the clash of perceptions, as the "good" side tries to impose its black and white (and incomplete) version of reality upon a world that is significantly more complex than that.

I was rather disappointed that Carey did not appear to have followed through the implications of destroying a portion of the universal Godhead. It's not really clear from anything that comes before why Satoris'death would not in fact have catastrophic consequences, the next time that the One God decides to reconstitute Itself and discovers that one-sixth of It is missing.

As another reviewer remarked, this is a philosophical meditation disguised as a fantasy novel. Plot, character and worldbuilding are sufficient, but not generous (though I rather liked the creepiness of the Gandalf-figure - mind-control through magic gems, hmm), which is why I am only giving it four stars. A certain familiarity and understanding of Tolkien and his philosophy would probably be very helpful. This is not for someone who just wants Kushiel-style hot sex, travelogues and a wallow in familiar tropes.

I enjoyed reading the two books in this sequence, and it would be nice if she wrote more. I would like to know how the new world at the end turns out.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Robert Haas on June 13, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As other reviewers have noted, the story borrows heavily from LOTR, but with a well-developed cosmology and mythology of its own that make it an interesting read. Unfortunately, it's pretty clear from relatively early on that the supposedly evil guys are really not all that bad, and the supposedly good guys are little better (and in some ways possibly worse), and while that's an interesting concept, it's not really enough. I think Jacqueline Carey sold her readers a little short with this one: the second half of this novel was boringly predictable, as if, having turned good and evil on their heads, she feared to do anything else.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jingitook on October 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Again, I am also a fan of the Kushiel series, however, THIS IS NOT KUSHIEL! This is a whole different world, and it is amazing, with it's own mythology and history.

Wow... some of this book was sadly predictable, not sadly as in bad writing, sad because you know that's how it had to be. Other parts were also amazingly surprising, and also sad in the same aspect, it had to be.

This book was excellent, and it made me cry and laugh at the appropriate parts. And the ending, though it's horrible and made me Carey, was very well-written, and it does leave it open for a possible sequel, which I wouldn't be adverse to.
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37 of 49 people found the following review helpful By samael775 on December 29, 2005
Format: Hardcover
in this wonderful sequel to her magnifcent epic fantasy novel Banewreaker, the battle for Urulat comes to its epic conclusion (maybe). it is beatifully written with a very thought provoking plot and an interesting array of characters. what more can i say? well, what did the skeptics say?

fortunately, most of the romantic fantasy fans and Tolkien purists didn't bother to read (or at least review) this one but still its ratings fall. here are the various complaints against the series and my responses:

ITS NOT LIKE KUSHIEL!

i have yet to read Kushiel, BUT THIS IS A GREAT BOOK. however, if you don't like epic fantasy, you probably won't like it.

IT RIPS OFF TOLKIEN

first of all, WHO CARES! all fantasy books take some inspiration from Tolkien. besides, Tolkien took all that stuff about the beautiful immortal elves(rather than Santa's little helpers), the dwarves that live under the earth, the cursed ring, the sword that was reforged, right out of the Poetic Edda (also a great book). plus, Carey didn't JUST rip off Tolkien, the Marasoumie were right out of Robert Jordan, the whole theme of good seen as evil is very Miltonian, the inevitability of fate theme is omnipresent in Homer, Beowulf, and the Edda, although it seems odd to our modern taste, Satoris' refusal to kill Cerelinde bears striking similarity to Odin's refusal to slay Fenrir, the "water of life" that makes thing young is right of of Norse mythology, the Helm of Shadows sounds like Fafnir's Helm of Terror in the very lays that inspired Tolkien, and the "gifts" of Haomane and Satoris sound like the gifts of Hoenir and Lothur(who is probably Loki, the sort-of-evil god) in the Edda.
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