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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two Fantastic Godzilla Movies
I'm not a hard-core Godzilla fan, but i find them entertaining, so i picked up this DVD. Upon watching it, the one thing that really annoyed me was the lack of the widescreen option. I always like to have the original scope of the film. That is a main reason why i didn't give it 5 stars. The japanese soundtrack isn't available as an option. I prefer the english dubbing...
Published on April 10, 2001 by Xam

versus
31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Four stars for the films, one for the DVD
Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah and its follow-up Godzilla vs. Mothra are easily two of the finest films in the series. Koichi Kawakita won a Japanese Academy Award in 1991 for his visual effects for Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah, and the following year, Godzilla vs. Mothra became one of the biggest financial hits in Toho's history, selling over four million tickets in Japan, a...
Published on January 4, 2010 by abettertomorrow


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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two Fantastic Godzilla Movies, April 10, 2001
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
I'm not a hard-core Godzilla fan, but i find them entertaining, so i picked up this DVD. Upon watching it, the one thing that really annoyed me was the lack of the widescreen option. I always like to have the original scope of the film. That is a main reason why i didn't give it 5 stars. The japanese soundtrack isn't available as an option. I prefer the english dubbing anyway, for comic effect at least. For those people who prefer the english subtitles that option should have been presented as well as the widescreen option. But I do really like the fact that you get two movies on this DVD, while costing the same as one normally does. And anyway these are two of my favorite Godzilla movies and they look good on this DVD. These two movies are both really cool: Mothra: Battle for Earth is really my favorite, the tiny twin women are fantastic! King Ghidora is very entertaining but not nearly as cool as Mothra. It's worth the money if you're a casual Godzilla fan like me, and don't mind the missing japanese soundtrack and widescreen options...
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Four stars for the films, one for the DVD, January 4, 2010
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah and its follow-up Godzilla vs. Mothra are easily two of the finest films in the series. Koichi Kawakita won a Japanese Academy Award in 1991 for his visual effects for Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah, and the following year, Godzilla vs. Mothra became one of the biggest financial hits in Toho's history, selling over four million tickets in Japan, a number that hadn't been reached since the early 60s. Unfortunately, neither film got a stateside release until Sony defecated out this horrendous DVD in 1998 to coincide with Roland Emmerich's even bigger defecation that same year.

Not only are both films sandwiched on one disc, but they're not even in widescreen, and neither of them come with the original Japanese audio with English subtitles. Instead, the viewer has to endure dubbing that is so jaw-droppingly awful that it's amazing Toho would ever allow their films to get this sort of treatment. It's inconceivable how bottom-of-the-barrel Godzilla films like Godzilla's Revenge and even Godzilla vs. Gigan have decent DVDs while these more elaborate films are stuck with cheap double feature DVDs.

Luckily, there are rumors of new DVDs of these films being made, so maybe it's best that fans of the series wait for the new issues, as they will most likely be in anamorphic widescreen with the original Japanese audio. Until then I'd recommend hunting down subtitled DVDs and even VHS's from online distributors instead of settling for this Sony DVD.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best Godzilla movies, November 5, 2006
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
Godzilla vs King Ghidorah:

While best appreciated by true Godzilla fans, this movie is actually a pretty good science fiction story in its own right. A tricked out space craft with time travel ability presents some intriguing plot possibility that keeps the audience wondering. One interesting insights is how the story portrays what Japan will become in the future. Add to that a back story that presents the origins of both Godzilla and Ghidorah and you end up with one of the best Godzilla movies ever made.

Godzilla and Mothra:

This is basically an updated movie of the early flicks involving Mothra. Worth watching if you're a big Godzilla or Mothra fan.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Movies On One DVD!, December 7, 2005
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This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah- The King Is Back!

This is the sequel to Godzilla vs. Biollante. This introduces Ghidora into the new series.

For people who are not really big Godzilla fans, the Godzilla movies are broken up into 3 parts so far. 1954-1978 is the Showa series, 1984-1995 is the Heisei series and 1999-Present is the Shinsei or Millennium series. Each has different stories. Originally in the Showa series, Ghidora came to Earth by a meteorite, but this movie is in the newer Heisei (1984-1995) series. According to this series, Ghidora was mutated from Durats way back in the 1940's. If you follow the Heisei movies in order, this movie is interesting because the added on to what was already said. They mention about his fight with Biollante in this movie, and Biollante was the movie before this. If you watch this without order, this may not be as interesting. Watch the movies in order because it is meant as a series all the way up to Godzilla vs. Destroyah and is more fun to watch.

Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth- Moth with Rodan's Voice

The Battle for Earth has to be one of the best Godzilla movies I have seen. From the story to the special fx, this movie is all around really great! The only thing wrong is that a new monster named Battra the "black mothra" sounds like Rodan. Besides that, this movie is solid gold
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome! Finally a '90's Godzilla!, May 5, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
Ever since I saw the original 50's Godzilla, I had always wondered how it had evolved in the 90's. Now I know. It's plain awesome! A bigger Godzilla with even bigger special effects. I love it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Coolest Godzilla Movies!, April 4, 2002
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
These movies are packed with action and adventure and have never ending turns and twists!
Godzilla vs. Mothra,Battle For Earth is about three explorers travel to an island,near with a meator landed.They then discover a giant egg and two girls smaller then a flower!But the egg hatches and forms the worm Mothra,while the metor hatches into the worm Batra!But when then two worms turn into giant flying super insects,there is a fight for surival ...P>Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah is about three time travelers from the 23rd century who come to warn that Godzilla will destroy Japan. The timetravelers take a writer and a team of scientists to the time of the dinosaur,Godzilla before it was exposed to nuecelar energy.But when the beast,King Ghidorah takes Godzilla`s place,the scientist`s only choice is to reive Godzilla!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Drat, It's Ghidorah Again!, July 14, 2010
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
GODZILLA VS. KING GHIDORAH

Back in 1991, Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah created something of a stir on this side of the water because there were rumblings that the film had distinct anti-American overtones. However, it would be several years before it received a domestic release (which was straight to video), and overall, the American audience found the fuss to be much ado about nothing.

For fans, the far bigger deal about Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah was Ghidorah's new origin and the convoluted storyline, which took the theme of time travel to new heights of ridiculousness. No longer an awesome, planet-destroying monster from space, Ghidorah is now the product of a weird combination of time travel, small critters, and radioactivity. The story goes like this: a time-traveling flying saucer lands in Japan in 1992, bringing with it an international crew from the year 2204. They claim that, in their age, Godzilla is running rampant and must be destroyed. They have discovered that Godzilla was birthed on a Pacific Island called Lagos during the U.S. nuclear experiments of 1945, so their plan is to go back to that time and move the dinosaur that will eventually become Godzilla to a new location. They succeed in doing this; however, they leave behind some cute little critters called dorats, or drats, which have features that suspiciously resemble King Ghidorah. And in the 20th century, Godzilla is gone from history (even though everyone somehow remembers him), and King Ghidorah has replaced him. Shock of shocks! The future people have planned all along not to save Japan but destroy it, thus preventing it becoming the dominant economic and political world power.

However, in the 20th Century, radioactivity apparently exists in profusion in every corner of the world, and in the Toho universe, radiation plus critter equals daikaiju. So the dinosaur is once again transformed into Godzilla, even bigger and more powerful than before. Godzilla and Ghidorah battle, and Godzilla prevails, casting Ghidorah's body--now minus one head--into the ocean. As Godzilla begins a devastating attack on Japan, future person Emi, who disapproves of her people's motivations, returns to the future, has the dormant Ghidorah reconstructed as a cyborg, and then returns it to the 20th Century to do battle with Godzilla. This time, Mecha Ghidorah whoops on Godzilla sufficiently to send him into the ocean, but in the process the cyborg is terminally damaged and sinks into the ocean as well.

With rare exception, I've never cared much for time travel stories, and after the relatively dark, disaster-themed scope of Return of Godzilla and the nightmarish topicality of Godzilla vs. Biollante, the fantastical excesses of Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah come off as outright silly--particularly its half-baked time-travel aspect. Beyond that, the alteration of King Ghidorah's origin--making it, in essence, a Godzilla changeling--serves to void the metaphorical power of the original Godzilla story; in essence, diminishing Godzilla himself. As a powerful alien entity from the stars, King Ghidorah worked. As the mere tool of an advanced but decadent future civilization, a deliberate product of technology, it falls flat on its face.

On the flip side, despite its very serious dramatic shortcomings, the pacing of the film is among the best of the Heisei series. The cinematography is colorful and well composed, and Akira Ifukube's powerful score, which reprises the original Ghidorah theme, is beautifully orchestrated. The Godzilla suit, only slightly modified from its design in Godzilla vs. Biollante, appears very impressive. Surprisingly, despite a Western cast with the acting ability of elementary schoolchildren, the backstory of the "Godzillasaurus" on Lagos Island plays out remarkably well. Yoshio Tsuchiya, portraying loyal-Imperial-Japanese-soldier-cum-industrial-magnate Shindo, turns in a superlative performance, and with Ifukube's score providing a poignant backdrop for his character, almost single-handedly elevates the movie to respectable status.

Whatever its failings, and they are many, Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah does succeed at being an entertaining movie, and when it comes to portraying Godzilla as a truly powerful, virtually unstoppable force of nature, it hardly gets any better.

GODZILLA AGAINST MOTHRA

The Heisei-era Godzilla films (1984-1995) began on a promising note, with Return of Godzilla (a.k.a. Godzilla 1985), which--though flawed--unfolded as much like a contemporary disaster film as a monster story. The following film, Godzilla vs. Biollante, was equally flawed, but it ventured into some new territory for the series; featured a redesigned, fierce-looking Godzilla; and brought the suitmation technique for endowing monsters with life to a more sophisticated level. Then...Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah happened, which might have been a spectacular visual treat, but was a holy horror in the plotting/internal logic department. The film was a box-office success, however, and Toho rushed the following film, Godzilla Against Mothra, right into production.

While the Heisei films generally maintained consistent continuity, the plot mostly ignores the events of Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah, for which one may well be thankful; however, the story rates among the most didactic of the Godzilla films, with an environmental theme so overbearing that even if you buy the message you wouldn't be averse to clocking the messenger. From its opening moments (an overt homage to Raiders of the Lost Ark), the film feels derivative, with much of its storyline lifted from 1961's Mothra and 1964's Mothra vs. Godzilla. Numerous catastrophic environmental disasters wrack the earth simultaneously, from typhoons to volcanoes to landslides due to over-development. In response to the ecological damage, Mothra and its darker sibling, Battra, are awakened--the latter with the aim to put things right on Earth by force. The more gentle Mothra opposes Battra, but its caretakers--the ten-inch tall fairies (now known as the Cosmos)--are kidnapped by the profiteering Mr. Tomokane of the land-grabbing Marutomo Corporation, and Mothra turns its ire on Japan in attempt to rescue them. In the meantime, Godzilla is not particularly happy with either monster, and comes around periodically to tangle with them--until, in the end, they team up and do a little whooping of their own.

The two main characters--rogue archaeologist Takuya Fujita (Tetsuya Bessho) and Masako Tezuka (Satomi Kobayashi)--provide slightly more engaging personalities than some of the other Godzilla films of the era; they are divorced and not amiably so. Some of the acrimonious interplay between them is convincing if not always appealing. Takehiro Murata, as Marutomo representative Kenji Andoh plays a corporate beanpod who almost has a conscience well enough, and even provides a touch of comic relief now and again. The greedy head of the Marutomo Corporation, played by Makoto Otake, is an amalgamation of notorious exploiters Clark Nelson from the original Mothra and Jiro Torahata from Mothra vs. Godzilla, but Otake's performance tends to be a bit over the top and devoid of any depth. Unfortunately, most of the rest of the cast stands around and offers nothing to the story, especially Heisei series regular Megumi Odaka as psychic Miki Saegusa, whose appearance in this film is solely to look worried.

While some of the special effects work may be impressive, the Mothra and Battra designs and execution are anything but. Mothra, in both larva and imago form, never appeared so artificial; despite the advances in SPFX technology in the intervening years, the Showa-era Mothra in all its various incarnations appeared more convincing, especially in the original 1961 film under the supervision of effects director Eiji Tsuburaya. Battra is a suitably evil-looking creature, but the puppet could hardly be less animated, and in many scenes its supporting wires are clearly visible.

During his tenure as special effects director, Koichi Kawakita had a tendency to overdo the optical effects, with an abundance of fiery rays constantly crossing the screen, sparkling flashes erupting over the landscape, and brilliant halos surrounding the monsters. In Godzilla Against Mothra, there's scarcely a scene with the monsters that isn't optically enhanced, and though the light show occasionally highlights the raw power of the monsters' deadly exchanges, for the most part, it simply distracts.

Unquestionably, the movie's single most effective feature is Akira Ifukube's musical score. While most of the themes are familiar, especially the Mothra motif used in the original Mothra vs. Godzilla (based on Yuji Koseki's score for the original 1961 Mothra), the richness and variations of the orchestrations add a poignancy the soundtrack, particularly the ending theme as Mothra flies into outer space to intercept and destroy a meteor on a catastrophic collision course with Earth.

Overall, Godzilla Against Mothra doesn't hold a candle to the Showa-era Mothra vs. Godzilla, to which it must inevitably compare, and at the time of its release, I would have called it the least entertaining of the Heisei-era Godzilla films, for despite its inane plot, at least Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah offered something unique. Unfortunately, there would be at least one other entry in the Heisei series to make Godzilla Against Mothra look like a classic....
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This is where the best G Flicks started, April 23, 2001
By 
Michael Pappalardo (Ronkonkoma, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
Actually, the best G flicks started at Godzilla 1985. Every one after that was great and entertaining to watch, even in late, late teens! I grew up with godzilla and was excited to see that the 'final' batch of movies made it here. Godzilla vs. King Ghidora was the worst of these 90's flicks though. The lame, confusing plot(as if all G movies aren't like that, this one just takes the cake) undoes every previous Godzilla movie before it. For some reason, they decided to give Godzilla a brand new origin, instead of the original origin as represented in Godzilla Raids Again, the first sequel waaaay back when. In this movie, which is VERY politically motivated, a band of american soldiers land on an island inhabited by JApanese soldiers during WWII. A 'Godzillasaurus' lives on this island, and is promptly dispatched by those 'filthy americans',with a terribly ear-piercing punchline by one of the american naval officers: 'Take that you dinosaur!' . Then it gets up again, and kills all the of the soldiers. Very anti-American, this movie was made during a trade dispute in the early 90's. Aside from the 'Kill Whitey' sub-plot, Godzilla is 're-created' when we americans launch a nuclear bomb onto that island (but i thought it was dropped on Hiroshima.....but ok). And thus, Godzilla is born. So, every movie is undone, because the Godzilla monster is then 'transported' into the future. Which would mean Godzilla never attacked Japan ever. And when he shows up, everyone immediately knows 'GODZILLA!'. Major plot hole. But hey, it's Godzilla, what the hell do you expect? Still a great flick and the introduction of Mecha-Ghidora. Godzilla really kicks Ghidorah's arse in this film, something he was never able to do by himself before. The movies that followed became quite interesting and entertaining. The 90's godzilla surely was the best. After the franchise was handed over to America and we butchered it, it was then brought back to Toho, and here we have Godzilla 2000, which i have yet to see. Can't wait!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars GODZILLA ROCKS ONCE AGAIN, November 14, 1999
By 
Sparky (East Haven, CT USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
What can I say? Having not seen the "new" Godzilla and just remembering the silly rubber suited wrestlers of the 60's, these Japanese imports from the 90's are very welcome. I wished the DVD had 5.1 surround sound and more features but the included theatrical trailers are not dubbed and are a hoot. I love how at the end of the trailers, they try to hawk Godzilla toys. Now I understand how Pokemon is so damn well marketed. A welcome addition to any Godzilla-philes's collection. Maybe in the future other Godzilla DVDs will be available with subtitles and actual Japanese dubbing that can be toggled on or off.(for us "purists")
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Here's some clean, family fun that won't bore the kids!, July 7, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth (DVD)
These newer Godzilla movies from TOHO are just what the doctor ordered for parents in these jaded times. They are fun, imaginative, and believe it or not, even the effects are pretty good in these newer ones. They have a very Spielberg-like slickness, the Japanese film industry has been catching up fast. My kids love these videos, they have excitement, monsters, action, all without the potty humor and racy jokes of the US "kids" films. Highly recommended!
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Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah / Godzilla & Mothra: The Battle for Earth
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