Buy Used
$2.39
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by WonderBook
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: 100% Guaranteed. Serving Millions of Book Lovers Since 1980. Very Good condition. Vinyl. Jacket Sleeve in Good condition. Generic insleeve included. Quality guaranteed! In original artwork/packaging unless otherwise noted.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Going Baroque
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Going Baroque


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Vinyl
"Please retry"
$2.39

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Check Out Our Turntable Store
    Need a new record player? Check out our turntable store for a great selection of turntables, needles, accessories, and more.

Product Details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: Philips
  • ASIN: B00166BB7I
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #587,796 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

STEREO

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Discophage TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 19, 2012
Format: Audio CD
"Going Baroque", the Swingle Singers' second album, from 1964, is lovely. The repertoire mixes the great hits and a few more obscure pieces, like Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach's Solfegietto and Wilhelm Friedmann Bach's Der Frühling, and all those pieces are marvelous, especially in the Swingle Singers renditions. This was their first recording of Bach's Badinerie (from his Orchestral Suite No. 2), which became one of the ensemble's abiding standards, their latest recording of it being an extraordinary version with vocal percussion in the 2007 album Beauty and the Beatbox. In the Largo from Bach's Harpsichord Concerto, the sensuous abandon of soprano Christiane Legrand's voice will make you swoon, and the rest combines the dazzling and the enrapturing.

So far, so good. But then, who'd want this CD? In the early 2000s, Universal, Philips or whoever held the rights to the early, Paris-based Swingle Singers' recordings released an eleven-CD box reissuing all the albums they had recorded for Philips between 1963 and 1972 (Best of), and this is one of them. But what was accepted in the LP days is infuriating in the CD era: all these albums but one time 30 minutes or under. And Going Baroque is one of the worst: 24:37!

This would have been infuriating enough if it had been the only way to get this marvelous music (which is the case with some of the other instalments in the series).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Discophage TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 19, 2012
Format: Audio CD
"Going Baroque", the Swingle Singers' second album, from 1964, is lovely. The repertoire mixes the great hits and a few more obscure pieces, like Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach's Solfegietto and Wilhelm Friedmann Bach's Der Frühling, and all those pieces are marvelous, especially in the Swingle Singers renditions. This was their first recording of Bach's Badinerie (from his Orchestral Suite No. 2), which became one of the ensemble's abiding standards, their latest recording of it being an extraordinary version with vocal percussion in the 2007 album Beauty and the Beatbox. In the Largo from Bach's Harpsichord Concerto, the sensuous abandon of soprano Christiane Legrand's voice will make you swoon, and the rest combines the dazzling and the enrapturing.

So far, so good. But then, who'd want this CD (as the Amazon system automatically links this review to entries for the original LP, note that it is the CD that I am reviewing, found under ASIN B00005LF2W or B000P0HO4U)? In the early 2000s, Universal, Philips or whoever held the rights to the early, Paris-based Swingle Singers' recordings released an eleven-CD box reissuing all the albums they had recorded for Philips between 1963 and 1972 (Best of), and this is one of them. But what was accepted in the LP days is infuriating in the CD era: all these albums but one time 30 minutes or under. And Going Baroque is one of the worst: 24:37!

This would have been infuriating enough if it had been the only way to get this marvelous music (which is the case with some of the other instalments in the series).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Vinyl
The Swingle Singers' second PHILIPS label LP, GOING BAROQUE (1963, PHS 600-126/PHM 200-126) won a 1964 Grammy for Best Choral Performance. The previous year, their debut album, BACH'S GREATEST HITS (PHS 600-097/PHM 200-097) garnered Best Choral and New Artist Grammys.

The original Paris-based octet was comprised of:
WARD SWINGLE (tenor), the group's organizer and arranger
CHRISTIANE LEGRAND (lead soprano), composer Michael's sister and daughter of conductor Raymond L.
ANNE GERMAIN (contralto), a noted Wagnerian mezzo
JEANETTE BAUCOMONT (soprano), prize-winning pianist/singer and a member of the Society of Antique Music
CLAUDINE MEUNIER (contralto), a converted classical violinist
CLAUDE GERMAIN (tenor), originally a pop crooner, as a student at Paris Conservatory he won the Prix de Piano
JEAN-CLAUDE BRIODIN (bass-baritone), another Paris Conservatory prize-winner (for saxophone)
JEAN CUSAC (bass-baritone), a Paris Conservatory cum laude grad and performer in grand opera
Also featured: GARY PEDERSEN (bass) and GUY WALLEZ (drums)

RANDOM "TRACK" NOTES
A breathlessly-paced "Badiniere" received the most radio play in its day. Karl P.E. Bach's "Solfeggietto" is equally allegretto. How the singers can keep together at such breakneck speeds is baffling. "Air" starts at a more manageable tempo but takes off for the reiteration. "Gigue" features the men. Its mood is playful. Miss Legrand solos on the harpsichord concerto "Largo." Vivaldi's "Fugue" is simply marvelous: complex, yet performed flawlessly. Handel's "Allegro" also benefits from acrobatic Swingleization. W.F. Bach's "Spring" is propelled by a triangle, of all things.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category