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Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief Hardcover – Deckle Edge


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; First Edition edition (January 17, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307700666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307700667
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (749 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,627 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Immersed in this book, the reader is drawn along by tantalizing revelations while simultaneously exhausted, longing for escape from its cloistered world—mirroring the accounts of many former Scientologists on the record, here. In efficient, unemotional prose, Wright begins with the biography of founder L. Ron Hubbard: his days as a prodigiously prolific writer of pulp fiction, his odd military career, the publication of his breakthrough self-help book Dianetics (1950), and the influence, riches, and controversy that have followed since he founded the Church of Scientology in 1954. For those aware of Scientology through its celebrity adherents (Tom Cruise and John Travolta are the best known) rather than its works, the sheer scope of the church’s influence and activities will prove jaw-dropping. Wright paints a picture of organizational chaos and a leader, David Miscavige, who rules by violence and intimidation; of file-gathering paranoia and vengefulness toward apostates and critics; of victories over perceived enemies, including the U.S. government, won through persuasion, ruthless litigation, and dirty tricks. Even more shocking may be the portrayal of the Sea Org, a cadre of true believers whose members sign contracts for a billion years of service, and toil in conditions of indentured servitude, punished mercilessly for inadvertent psychic offenses. Their treatment is a far cry from the coddling afforded to the much-courted celebrities. (Wright does point out that, for whatever reason, most Sea Org members remain in service voluntarily.) Page after page of damaging testimony, often from formerly high-ranking officers, is footnoted with blanket denials from the church and other parties (e.g., “The church categorically denies all charges of Miscavige’s abuse” and “Cruise, through his attorney, denies that he ever retreated from his commitment to Scientology”). Readers will have to decide whether to believe the Pulitzer-winning author’s carefully sourced reporting, or the church’s rebuttals. But, quoting Paul Haggis, the Academy Award–winning film director and former Scientologist whom Wright first profiled in the New Yorker: “if only a fraction of these accusations are true, we are talking about serious, indefensible human and civil rights violations.” Going Clear offers a fascinating look behind the curtain of an organization whose ambition and influence are often at odds with its secretive ways. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The publisher’s announced first printing of 150,000 seems right on the money. Wright will be promoting the book on a seven-city tour, but its reputation precedes him. --Keir Graff

Review

Praise for Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief, by Lawrence Wright   
        
 
 “Powerful . . . essential reading.” —Michael Kinsley, the front page of The New York Times Book Review

“Who’d have thought a history of a religion would offer so many guilty pleasures?   Lawrence Wright’s enthralling account of Scientology’s rise brims with celebrity scandal. To anyone who gets a sugar rush from Hollywood gossip, the chapters on Tom Cruise and John Travolta will feel like eating a case of Ding Dongs.”
      —Evan Wright, The Los Angeles Times

“An utterly necessary story . . . A feat of reporting. The story of Scientology is the great white whale of investigative journalism about religion.”—Paul Elie, The Wall Street Journal

“Wright’s account of the church’s history and struggles is helpful, admirably fair-minded and, at times, absorbing . . . The book’s most intriguing aspect, though is not its treatment of Scientology, in particular,  but its raising general questions about the nature of faith and reason and the role of religion in American life.”
       —Troy Jollimore, Chicago Tribune 

“A wild ride of a page-turner, as enthralling as a paperback thriller . . .I could go on and on, listing Hubbard’s tall tales, paranoid delusions and eccentricities, as well as Miscavige’s brutalities and tidbits from the famously wacky and decidedly unscientific Scientologist cosmology.”—Laura Miller, Salon.com

“Insightful, gripping, and ultimately tragic . . . The initial biographical section [about L. Ron Hubbard] could stand as an engrossing book in itself. . . .The second section,
“Hollywood,” provides the answer to one of the great mysteries of the modern world:  What’s the deal with Tom Cruise and Scientology?”—Buzzy Jackson, The Boston Globe 

“A hotly compelling read. It’s a minutiae-packed book full of wild stories.”
      —Janet Maslin, The New York Times                                                                   

  
“Lawrence Wright brings a clear-eyed investigative fearlessness to Scientology—its history, theology, its hierarchy—and the result is . . . evidence that truth can be stranger even than science fiction.”—Lisa Miller, The Washington Post
 
 
“A gripping, exhaustive, remarkably evenhanded investigation of the religion everyone loves to hate.”—Lawrence Levi, Newsday  
 
 
“It’s incredible.   It is an incredible, fascinating read.    It is like a pirate novel, but there are celebrities in it. I admired [Wright’s] chutzpah, he’s like Don Quixote.”—The Hairpin
 
 
“Revealing and disturbing . . . A series of devastating revelations that will come as news even to hardened Scientology buffs who follow the Church’s every twist and turn.”—The Daily Beast                                                
 
 
“Devastating . . . A patient, wholly compelling investigation into a paranoid "religion" and the faithful held in its sweaty grip.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
 
“Not only a titillating expose on the reported “you’re kidding me” aspects of the religion, but a powerful examination of belief itself.”—Entertainment Weekly
 
 
“A fascinating look behind the curtain of an organization whose ambition and influence are often at odds with its secretive ways. . . . For those aware of Scientology through its celebrity adherents (Tom Cruise and John Travolta are the best known) rather than its works, the sheer scope of the church’s influence and activities will be jaw-dropping.”
                  —Keir Graff, Booklist
 
 
“An eye-opening short biography of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and a long-form journalism presentation of the creature Hubbard birthed: a self-help system complete with bizarre cosmology, celebrity sex appeal, lawyers, consistent allegation of physical abuse, and expensive answers for spiritual consumers.”—Publishers Weekly
 
 
 

 
 

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Customer Reviews

To anyone with the slightest interest or curiosity about Scientology, this book is a must read.
SqSdy
They are "PR" to try to make organized Scientology look good to the public while in many cases are themselves a danger to the public.
Denise Brennan
Lawrence Wright has written a well documented and researched book on the controversial cult of Scientology.
Sylviastel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

502 of 520 people found the following review helpful By Bill Gallagher on January 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Imagine if you were reading a novel that included a character who wrote sci-fi novels, was obsessed with wealth and status symbols, was paranoid about the government, treated others badly, and yet started a religion as a business venture that attracted thousands of devoted followers. You'd probably say, "yeah, right; a nice allegory for an aspect of the American psyche, but I don't think so." Although, if you were familiar with Scientology, you might not be so surprised.

Many aren't familiar with Scientology, in part because the Scientologists have been relentless and devoted to stamping out dissent and negative portrayals of their religion (previous books on L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology's founder ended up with the publisher abandoning the project due to law suits and the British publisher of this book, dropped it for fear of libel law suits [which are easier to win in the UK]). New Yorker writer Lawrence Wright, who is known as one of our great investigative journalists, has prepared himself by doing an incredible amount of due diligence and fact checking (apparently the fact checkers at the New Yorker, which first published an article on Scientology by Wright, made herculean efforts to make sure they got the facts right).

Scientology does not come off well in Going Clear. Wright portrays Scientology as in large part an expression of L. Ron Hubbard's whimsy: "Even as Hubbard was inventing the doctrine, each of his decisions and actions would become enshrined in Scientology lore as something to be emulated -- his cigarette smoking, for instance, which is still a feature of the church's culture at the upper levels, as are his 1950s habits of speech, his casual misogyny, his aversion to perfume and scented deodorants, and his love of cars and motorcycles and Rolex watches.
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270 of 284 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on January 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I've read another summary of Scientology - Wright's is far superior, and I especially like his detailing of the church's beliefs. He traces Scientology from its origin in the imagination of science-fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, its struggle to become accepted as a legitimate (and tax-exempt) religion, efforts to infiltrate governments (placed up to 5,000 Scientologists as spies in government agencies around the world, charging them with finding officials files on the church to help generate intimidating lawsuits,' vindictive treatment of critics (favorite weapon - lawsuits intended to bury the defendant in legal costs) and many who leave its ranks (often incarcerated in deplorable conditions for years and further punished if they tried to escape), and its impressive wealth. The objective, per Wright, of Scientologists, is to climb up the Bridge to Total Freedom's innumerable steps and then achieve eternal life. The organization's major goal is recruiting new members, increasingly achieved via exploiting celebrities such as Tom Cruise, John Travolta - he credits Scientology with putting his career into high-gear), and enlisting young members into its Sea Organization clergy - often as young 10 - 12 year-old children signing up for billion-year contracts and work under poor conditions for little/no payment (eg. 90-hour weeks for $50/week, with one day off for schooling) and pressured to undergo abortions if they became pregnant. (A billion years is but a temporary job in Scientology - they contend the world is already four quadrillion years old, and attaining immortality should certainly extend beyond one billion more years.)

Scientology informally claims to have 8 million members (based on the number who have contributed members) and welcomes another 4.4 million new people every year.
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140 of 148 people found the following review helpful By J. Johnson on January 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wow, this book is amazing. Both this and Reitman's Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion are required reads for those interested in Scientology. The Scientology website does not tell you the whole story. That is a proven, documented, fact. I also say this as a former Scientologist that left a few months ago. This book not only follows the story of a prominent Scientologist that left after a long 34 years as a dedicated Scientologist, but also provides great insight into the founder of the organization, as well as the host of controversy that has followed Scientology since its founding.

If you're considering joining Scientology, I encourage you to not only read what they say about themselves on their website, but also read the neutral and critical perspectives of Scientology as well, including this book. This organization is not a joke. I quietly left in November, and to this day, I still receive daily phone calls, texts, emails, letters, etc. They wanted me to forget about my education and work for Scientology, since they view their religion as the most important thing in the whole world, of all time. I was told by one staff member that studying for a graduate entrance exam was not as important as studying Scientology. I was also pressured to buy books and lectures, even when I said that I didn't have enough money. I was pressured to join staff at "the org", even after repeatedly stating that I had no time with school and work, and even after explicitly stating that I didn't want to. If you value your time, your education, and most importantly your money, do not join Scientology.
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