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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a pity there isn't a sequel to this one.
In this sequel to Boy, Roald Dahl writes about his life as a young adult. After leaving Repton, his boarding school, he signed on with the Shell Oil Company and was sent to East Africa, which is now called Tanzania. While Dahl was serving in Tanzania, World War II happened and he signed up with the Royal Air Force. He chronicles in detail his work for Shell, and his...
Published on May 23, 2002 by Meaghan

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Going Solo
Going Solo (the sequel to Boy) is a collection of Roald Dahl's most interesting stories of his time in Africa. These include: meeting a man you gives himself dandruff, teaching an African boy to read and write, seeing a lion attack a cook, learning to fly without a teacher, crashing in the African desert, leading a unit of R.A.F. soldiers to stop a caravan of German...
Published on November 29, 2006


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a pity there isn't a sequel to this one., May 23, 2002
By 
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
In this sequel to Boy, Roald Dahl writes about his life as a young adult. After leaving Repton, his boarding school, he signed on with the Shell Oil Company and was sent to East Africa, which is now called Tanzania. While Dahl was serving in Tanzania, World War II happened and he signed up with the Royal Air Force. He chronicles in detail his work for Shell, and his experiences as an RAF pilot.
In East Africa, Roald Dahl had a near-fatal encounter with a deadly black mamba, whose poison can kill you in about two seconds. Right after the war broke out Roald's servant, a descendant of warrior tribesman, decided to become a warrior himself and killed a civillian. Roald had to spirit him away before the murder was discovered. And just to show how dangerous flying with the RAF was, one day when Roald returned from a mission his tent-mate told him, "I boiled enough tea for two, just in case you happened to come back." He was eventually shot down, but survived. While recuperating in the hospital, he fell in love with his nurse.
Going Solo was, like all of Dahl's books, wonderful. I only wish he'd have written a third about his later adulthood. Pity he died before he could do that.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting book about roald dahls book, May 22, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
As a 17 year old boy who spent my childhood in Norway, with roalds books, I was really surprised when I found at that he wrote books for adults as well. This is the kind of book which it is hard to put down when youre reading, but unfortunately after sitting for hours in my stressless I was out of pages. This book continues the story begun in boy, where dahl tells us about his highlights in life, from the point where he worked for Shell until he has finished his service in the RAF, and he returns back to a war raged Brittain . I would just wish that roald had written more about his life because I found it very entertaining
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Autobiography, January 16, 1999
By A Customer
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This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
It's a pity that amazon.com descibes this book as "Reading level: Young adult," because it really should be classified among Dahl's adult literature, along with "Boy," "Switch Bitch." and my personal favorite, "My Uncle Oswald."
This is a beautifully written, exciting and fascinating story that will rivet the attention of readers of any age. I sent a copy to my uncle, a former Marine pilot during World War II now in his eighties, and he couldn't put it down.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Going Solo, November 29, 2006
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
Going Solo (the sequel to Boy) is a collection of Roald Dahl's most interesting stories of his time in Africa. These include: meeting a man you gives himself dandruff, teaching an African boy to read and write, seeing a lion attack a cook, learning to fly without a teacher, crashing in the African desert, leading a unit of R.A.F. soldiers to stop a caravan of German people from leaving Dar es Salaam, becoming temporarily blind, meeting the girl of his dreams then falling out of love when he sees her and living on a Greek airfield soon before he was grounded. Roald Dahl's style of writing changes each time slightly changes to fit the story. Basically, you get the idea that you have known Roald for years and he is just telling you an amusing story. Going Solo was not as interesting as some of his other fiction stories. For some readers it may not be interesting enough to keep you in the book; but it is not boring, thrills and adventure are always happening. To compare this to Boy would be a little difficult because even though they are the same writer, Boy is about his childhood and is for younger readers. Going Solo is probably for older readers. Even it you do not like one of the chapters the next will bring you back in. So if you want a lot of good anecdotes to read then or if you really liked Boy, you should pick up Going Solo.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really good book, March 22, 2010
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
This a great book. It is very discreptive it tells everything about his life and is very well done. Before you read this book read Boy tales of a childhood.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book, March 14, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
I'm German so I'm sorry for all the mistakes I will surely make. This book is humorous, it's easy to understand and it tells a good story. I've never read a book written this way, but I loved it. It's simply Roald Dahl's way to retell his own life. He tells about accidents very dry, however, it was funny. So everybody reading this: you should buy this book, I can't tell you the story and how great she is but you're able to read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A most surprising book!, August 7, 2005
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
This gem of a book is surprising in many ways. The whimsical cover suggests tongue-in-cheek, and, indeed, there is some of that, but mostly it is a book that sneaks up on you, grabs you, and astonishes. `Going Solo' is the story of Roald Dahl's World War 2 experiences, and is divided roughly into two main themes. The first part records the experiences he had while he was stationed in East Africa before the war, when excitement meant such things as dealing with green mambas. I know virtually nothing about Africa, but resolved to learn more after reading this part of the book. There are many charming stories here: watch for the one taking place on his voyage out when Dahl discovers that his roommate is simulating dandruff on his dinner jacket with talcum powder!

The second half of the book records his RAF exploits, many of which would not be believed had this been a work of fiction. Dahl's descriptions of such things as plane crashes are charmingly low-key and understated, an unusual way to depict danger and hardship, but one that succeeds brilliantly in this book.

Adding to the charm of the book are pictures of letters, postcards, photographs, maps and the like - visuals that make the lively text come even more alive. This is one war story women who steer away from the usual blood-and-guts stereotype war novels will absolutely enjoy. It is a touching and interesting portrayal of courage and amazing happenings in the life of a very unassuming gentleman.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Half of Roald Dahl's life in 200 pages, June 2, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
SM Summary
Going Solo is an auto-biography of Roald Dahl. In this book Roald Dahl joins the army to fight in WW II while he is in Africa in the 1930's and 40's, Dahl comes face to face with many dangers, including lions, poisonous snakes, war waging people, and many other things while he is fighting for England. He has many adventures while he is in the war. This book is a good read and is hard to put down. if you like Roald Dahl than read this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The wonderful continuation of 'Boy', February 15, 2001
By 
Marcus Valdes (Fayetteville, GA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Going Solo (Paperback)
"Going Solo" is a continuation of Dahl's autobiography "Boy." Once started, one will not be able to put it down. It is a page turner. This should be required reading for all men above the age of 16. It details Dahl's life from the conclusion of his school days through his adventures and tribulations during the second world war as a fighter pilot with the RAF. A must read, you will not regret spending the time with this book!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A TESTAMENT TO ONE MAN'S LOVE OF FLYING, August 17, 2011
By 
MONTGOMERY (WASHINGTON, DC - U.S.A.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Going Solo. (Paperback)
Many years ago, I read this book, which thoroughly captivated me. Before earning a worldwide reputation as a writer of exciting and wildly imaginative children's books, Dahl had served as a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. Here he relates his experiences of undergoing flight training in Southern Africa. He conveys with touching clarity the stresses, joys, and pain any pilot trainee experiences in coming to grips with flying. As someone who is fascinated with aviation, I almost felt as if I were in the cockpit with Dahl as he advanced through the various levels of training.

Dahl went on to serve with a fighter squadron in Libya, which, in the wake of the German blitzkrieg in the Balkans in April 1941, was later sent to Greece. It proved to be a fruitless undertaking as Dahl's squadron sustained heavy losses and Dahl himself was greviously wounded. This book is a testament to one man's love for flying and his efforts to pick up the pieces and resume a full life again.
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Going Solo
Going Solo by Roald Dahl (Paperback - January 1, 1999)
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