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Gold Diggers of 1937


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Editorial Reviews

SHRINK WRAPPED

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Dick Powell, Joan Blondell, Glenda Farrell, Victor Moore, Lee Dixon
  • Directors: Lloyd Bacon
  • Writers: George Haight, Michael Wallace, Richard Maibaum, Warren Duff
  • Producers: Earl Baldwin, Hal B. Wallis, Jack L. Warner
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Original recording remastered, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: September 16, 2008
  • Run Time: 101 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001A5ES7K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,703 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Gold Diggers of 1937" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
36%
4 star
45%
3 star
18%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 11 customer reviews
The DVD is expensive but better value if purchased as part of the 2nd set of Busby Berkeley.
Douglas M
Unfortunately, not all of the film from this scene has been salvaged so for the very end we can only hear what is going on.
Samantha Glasser
The plot moves along at a good pace and it held my attention despite a few unnecessary details.
Matthew G. Sherwin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Samantha Glasser VINE VOICE on September 23, 2008
Format: DVD
Gold Diggers of 1937 doesn't have the best plot in the world, but it makes up for what it lacks with the great musical numbers. Dick Powell stars as an insurance salesman who can't seem to sell a policy. On a train he finds himself face to face with Joan Blondell; it is love at first sight. Love does wonders for him and he soon finds a client. Victor Moore might not be a great candidate for life insurance; he isn't very young and he isn't very healthy, but he is interested in a million dollar policy.

"Speaking of the Weather" is a catchy and sweet little tune played beautifully by Powell and Blondell, by this time married and in the throes of love. There is a great tap routine in the second rendition of the song. "All is Fair in Love and War," the big finale, features a bevy of beautiful girls rocking in rocking chairs and bombing their beaus from across a largely black screen. It isn't as impressive as one might expect. The blank background seems a little too simple as the song isn't so great. Still, since Busby Berkeley had a hand in it, it comes off better than it would have without his guidance.

Also included on this DVD are two clips from the lost film Gold Diggers of Broadway, a film considered to be the first of the Gold Diggers movies. It was filmed in two strip technicolor, so it is a curiosity to early film lovers. "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" is a straightforward musical number, but the grand finale is quite impressive with a gorgeous skyscraper background and intricate dance routines. Unfortunately, not all of the film from this scene has been salvaged so for the very end we can only hear what is going on.
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Format: DVD
Gold Diggers of 1937 was the last film of the "Gold Diggers" series done at Warner Brothers with the aid of Busby Berkeley. You can tell that they were winding it all down, too: the plot is good but there just isn't that little extra bit of "zest" that was in the previous "Gold Diggers" films. On the other hand, don't expect to be too disappointed. The musical numbers are still rather memorable and with Dick Powell's singing they shine bright. The choreography by Busby Berkeley couldn't be better and the cinematography is very good, too. The plot moves along at a good pace and it held my attention despite a few unnecessary details.

When the action begins, we meet some chorus girls who are out of work during the Great Depression. Among them are Norma Perry (Joan Blondell) and her pal Genevieve 'Gen' Larkin (Glenda Farrell). They decide to make "friends" with the guys onboard a train ride home; the men are coming from an insurance sales convention and they are just as happy to meet the ladies as the ladies are to meet the men onboard the train. At one point, so many men are literally chasing after Norma that she quickly ducts for safety into Rosmer 'Rossi' Peck's (Dick Powell) cabin. Almost instantly, Rosmer and Norma sense a spark of love between them; and Rosmer gives Norma his card telling her to go to the insurance company where he works to look for a stenographer position.

Meanwhile, there's another story percolating--and it's getting pretty intense, too. It seems that the hypochondriac theater producer J.J. Hobart (Victor Moore) is broke and unable to put on his upcoming Broadway show--only he doesn't know it. Without telling him, his sneaky partners Morty Wethered (Osgood Perkins) and Tom Hugo (Charles D. Brown) squandered Hobart's money on bad stock tips.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Douglas M VINE VOICE on November 16, 2008
Format: DVD
By 1937, the Hays Code had removed the sting from Warner Brother's famous musicals and this film was the last of the cycle. A cynical farce about insurance salesmen, it has a touch more plot than most of its predecessors. The merits include:

- Dick Powell, spirited, funny and underrated as usual, paired with wife Joan Blondell. Blondell had been regroomed into a very pretty leading lady and she and Powell's rapport is obvious. They play on a very intimate level with great warmth.
- excellent photography and production values.
- one outstanding song, "With Plenty of Money and You" which Powell sings prior to the opening credits and reprises in a charming scene with Blondell.
- Lee Dixon performing a great tap routine to "Speaking of the Weather", after "Let's put our heads together", one of those delightful songs which is tossed around the cast and the chorus girls at a garden party.
- a few witty lines, mainly delivered by Glenda Farrell as the usual predatory female.

Busby Berkeley was brought in to stage the finale and "All's fair in Love and War" is a dumb battle of the sexes. The staging is surprisingly flat and there is a lot of marching and not much performing. It's a dud.

The DVD print is in reasonable shape and there are plenty of extras. The technicolour short is another in a series of history lessons which Warners produced quite regularly at this time and they are uniformly awful. This one tells the story behind the Louisana Purchase. Two cartoons are titled from 2 songs from the film. The best one has magazine covers coming to life with lots of topical references of the time.
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