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Man with the Golden Gun (50th Anniversary Repackage) [Blu-ray]

3.9 out of 5 stars 322 customer reviews

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(Oct 02, 2012)
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Editorial Reviews

Actors: Maud Adams, James Cossins, Carmen Du Sautoy, Britt Ekland, Clifton James Directors: Guy Hamilton Format: AC-3, Blu-ray, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen Language: English (Dolby TrueHD), French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 5.1) Subtitles: English, Spanish Dubbed: French, Spanish Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.) Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 Number of discs: 1 Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested) Studio: MGM

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    PG
    Parental Guidance Suggested
  • DVD Release Date: October 2, 2012
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (322 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008YKV1EW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #145,106 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on May 26, 2001
Format: DVD
I know this one doesn't usually appear near the top of many critics' Best Bond Movie lists, but it's near the top of mine. Roger Moore was really in his prime in this one, and this was one of his tougher, more physical Bond performances. Moore has always been suave, and he posesses perhaps the best comic timing and delivery of any of the Bond actors, and he uses that well in Golden Gun. Also, in regards to the melody of the title song, and it's use throughout the movie, this is, IMO, the most effective scoring in the whole Bond series. There are great, exotic locales, exciting stunt sequences, and definitely one of the strongest villains in the whole series. I thought Lee's character of Scaramanga was perhaps a bit more realistic than many Bond villains, as he was more of an intelligent, psychotic loner rather than some megalomaniac set on world domination As a fan of the series, I also appreciated the Bond vs. Scaramanga final showdown as a nice change of pace from the common large scale "good commandos" vs. "evil army" battle that's used in a lot of Bond films. I also find the J.W. Pepper character to be one of the funniest in the series, so his appearance was a plus for me--this Bond movie had just enough humor to enhance the action and make it fun, without it going overboard and getting too cheesy, as they did with some of the later Moore movies. I just found this movie to be incredibly entertaining, and it just had that great Bond "feel" to it. Great picture and sound on the DVD, and a really cool documentary on the stuntmen and stunts from the whole series.
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Format: DVD
When I first saw "The Man with the Golden Gun" on its release I had mixed reactions about it. "Live and Let Die" had been such a departure from the James Bond we had been used to seeing, it was good to see some of the old elements return to this film.
The character of James Bond had been revamped in "Live and Let Die" in an attempt, I suppose, to dissociate Roger Moore's interpretation of Bond from that of Sean Connery's. In "Live and Let Die" gone were the "Martinis shaken not stirred," the Dom Perigone, Bond's virility, worldliness and sardonic wit. Even his wardrobe was over-the-top.
In "Live and Let Die" gone also was John Barry's score, Desmond Lewelin as Q, M's briefing at "Universal Exports" headquarters, the gambling casinos, engagingly futuristic and lavish sets, the sensuous and worldly bevy of Bond women.
"The Man with the Golden Gun" opens with Maurice Binder's gun barrel trademark, accompanied with the "James Bond Theme" this time played on strings, instead of guitar. That was a real innovation by John Barry, which he continued to use for Roger Moore. It was clearly evident Barry was back.
The first camera shot is of a surrealistically exotic locale on a beach where a beautiful girl towels down a tall ark man emerging from the water. The man is Scaramanga, the Man with the Golden Gun. John Barry's familiar background music accentuates the Epicurean surroundings and the film immediately looks like it has returned to more familiar Bondian territory.
As the film unfolded many of the aforementioned elements missing from "Live and Let Die" returned. There also seemed to be a more substantial plot as it initially unfolded. However, there were still undesirable elements that crept into the film as it progressed.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
In Roger Moore's second outing as 007, he's more comfortable in the role but still not up to Connery's more brutish agent. Bond is very stylish here and Moore looks great in formal wear to be sure. He could have used a little more practice in the martial arts department, preparing for a film that features...martial arts.

Bond appears to be destined for an assassin's bullet when a gold one appears at headquarters with his name on it. With the help of the "Q" branch, it is determined that the source of the bullet and threat is coming from a mysterious gun for hire named Scaramanga (Christopher Lee). The search for Scaramanga leads Bond to Hong Kong and Macau and eventually to small islands in "red" China territory.

Actually the first half of the film is pretty convincing and set up pretty well. Then, out come the gags and J. W. Pepper (Clifton James), the dufus sheriff from Louisiana who is in the far east on vacation. Sure he is. Bond is also on the lookout for a small device which is some kind of trigger for harnessing the Sun's energy as a power source. Gee, 40 years later we still haven't figured it out.

All of this gobbledygook is just the lead-in to Bond and Scaramanga's eventual gun fight. You'll have to guess who wins. While Lee is very effective as a villain and Bond babes Maud Adams and Britt Ekland add visual spender, on the whole, "Golden Gun" must be considered one of the weaker Bonds.

This Blu ray transfer comes in 1080p with a 1.85:1 aspect ratio. In general, the film looks pretty good. The colors are excellent and the night time scenes are well presented. Close ups are very good. Some of the scenes appear a little soft and you will see appropriate grain throughout. The audio was a little disappointing.
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