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Golden Age, The: Green Lantern - Archives, Volume 1 (Golden Age Green Latern Archives) Hardcover – May 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Series: Golden Age Green Latern Archives (Book 1)
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (May 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563895072
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563895074
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 6.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #301,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Edmund Lau Kok Ming on November 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Artist Martin Nodell created the Golden Age Green Lantern after seeing a railway lantern one night. The stories in this volume are written by the very talented Bill Finger - the "O. Henry of American comic books". This volume includes the very first appearance of the Green Lantern, Alan Scott, in All-American Comics #16 (July 1940) as well as his early stories in that same title and in his own book Green Lantern #1. Includes the first appearance of Irene Miller and Doiby Dickles. See Alan flirt endlessly with Irene and develop a true friendship with Doiby. This volume also includes an essay by Dr. William Moulton Marsten on Will-Power. Marsten is also the inventor of the lie detector and the creator of the original Golden Age Wonder Woman.
One thing that I especially like about the stories in this volume is how most of them are about "real" issues and crime. No super-villains here. No cosmic mumbo-jumbo. Just a person with a gift of power who wants to be helpful to the public. In the 1970s, Dennis O'Neil and Neal Adams came up with a series of "Relevance" stories starring the Silver Age Green Lantern and Green Arrow. Those stories were considered revolutionary because by then comics was all about fighting the super-villain of the month. Suddenly, there were stories about real crime, corruption, drugs, religious fanatics and the sort. But then, "Relevance" stories have always been in comics in the 1940s. Especially these Bill Finger penned classics here. Moreover, they appear less "forced" here than in the 1970s works (although I love those Hard-Travelling Heroes stories a lot also).
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ian Fowler on January 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
When I first started reading comic books, my only exposure to super-heros up to that point had been through other media, specifically the cartoon "The Super Friends". Imagine my surprise to learn that there was more than ONE of nearly every Super Friend in the comic books. Adding to my confusion was the fact that these counterparts lived on a parallel Earth, and that some, like Superman and Batman, were identical to the heroes I knew, but that others, like Flash and Green Lantern, were entirely different from the characters I watched Saturday mornings.

It didn't take me long to figure out what was going on: the heroes of the forties, the more famous revisions in the late 50s and early 60s, and the fact that after 1985, SOME of that didn't matter anymore. The Superman and Batman of Earth 2 were gone, but the GL and Flash remained along side their more famous Silver Age counterparts. And, for the most part, they retain a strong measure of popularity in their own right, co-starring in DC's monthly "JSA", as well as playing supporting roles throughout the comic book line. AND, for the most part, their golden age adventures were still part of continuity.

So it was with great eagerness that I picked up and read "The Golden Age Green Lantern Archives". And I must say I am pleased. Now, there are some basic caveats that go along with reading comics from the golden age. Character development is minimal; plot rules all. Art is mostly simple and cartoony. Narration is always needlessly elaborate (don't say in one word when you can say it in seven). Continuity is negligible. Taken in that spirit, the Golden Age Green Lantern is a treat.

For those not familiar, Green Lantern is really Alan Scott, the lone survivor of a train wreck, saved by a magical lantern.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Here is Martin Nodell's original Green Lantern as he began in the Golden Age.Learn how he discovered his lantern-powers,established an identity,got a worthwhile job-and met a true friend in Doiby Dickles.
Bill Finger,author of many of these tales,also was the original author of Batman.His help to Martin Nodell was as valuable as his help to Bob Kane.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Golden Age was fun, but was repetitive with respect to the type of enemy. There were no super villains or space aliens (I started GL comics because of the awful movie that came out recently; poorly executed as a film but I felt it was an intriguing story). Deserves 3 stars because it was enjoyable and interesting to put yourself back in the 40s. It will make a good beginning to my GL comic collection. I have, however, just started the GL Chronicles and am enjoying those stories much more.
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