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Gone, But Not Forgotten Mass Market Paperback – April 29, 2008


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Harper; Reprint edition (April 29, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061575224
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061575228
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 4 x 7.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #390,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Images of gruesome violence pervade this gripping tale of abduction and serial murder. Affluent housewives in Portland, Ore., are disappearing without a trace. In each case the only clue is a black rose and a note reading, "Gone, but Not Forgotten." Upstate New York police detective Nancy Gordon arrives to tell Portland's DA of a similar series of murders she had investigated back East. After implicating powerful local developer Martin Darius in the crimes, Gordon herself disappears. When several mutilated bodies are found at a construction site owned by Darius, police take him into custody. Darius's newly retained attorney, criminal lawyer Betsy Tannenbaum--a zealous advocate of women's rights and a successful defender of battered wives--begins her own search, which leaves her wondering if Darius is a psychotic killer on the loose, or the victim of a government cover-up involving the President's nominee for Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Margolin ( The Last Innocent Man ) writes with breakneck pacing and just the right injection of lurid detail to make chills race down readers' spines. If his narrative is a bit choppy and some of the plot twists are telegraphed too clearly, he nonetheless delivers a top-notch whodunit with an explosive and satisfying conclusion. Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club selection; major ad/promo; author tour.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Four women disappear from Hunter's Point, New York, before the murdered bodies of Sandra Lake and her six-year-old daughter are found. Next to Mrs. Lake are a black rose and a note that reads, "Gone, but not forgotten." Ten years later women are vanishing from Portland, Oregon. In each of their homes is a black rose and a note identical to that found in Hunter's Point. After hearing about the New York case and its possible connection to his, Portland's district attorney, Alan Page, arrests wealthy Martin Darius for the torture and murder of the people whose bodies are found on his property. Meanwhile, Betsy Tannenbaum, a rising star in the legal profession and Darius's lawyer, discovers incriminating evidence against him. Margolin combines the riveting suspense of the traditional thriller with the current legal thriller to create a first-rate novel containing all the best elements of a mystery as well. The pat denouement is the only negative in this thoroughly enticing book. Essential for all fiction collections. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/1/93.
- Jo Ann Vicarel, Cleveland Heights-University Heights P.L., Ohio
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

I grew up in New York City and Levittown, New York. In 1965, I graduated from the American University in Washington, D.C., with a bachelor's degree in government. I spent 1965 to 1967 in Liberia, West Africa, as a Peace Corps volunteer, graduated from New York University School of Law in 1970 as a night student. I went nights and worked as a junior high teacher in the South Bronx to support myself. My first job following law school was a clerkship with Herbert M. Schwab, the chief judge of the Oregon Court of Appeals, and from 1972 until 1996, I was in private practice, specializing in criminal defense at the trial and appellate levels. As an appellate attorney I have appeared before the United States Supreme Court, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the Oregon Supreme Court, and the Oregon Court of Appeals. As a trial attorney, I handled all sorts of criminal cases in state and federal court, and have represented approximately thirty people charged with homicide, several of whom faced the death penalty. I was the first Oregon attorney to use battered women's syndrome to defend a woman accused of murdering her spouse.

Since 1996, I have been writing full-time. All of my novels have been bestsellers. Heartstone, my first novel, was nominated by the Mystery Writers of America for an Edgar for best original paperback mystery of 1978. My second novel, The Last Innocent Man, was made into an HBO movie. Gone, But Not Forgotten has been sold to more than twenty-five foreign publishers and was made into a miniseries starring Brooke Shields. It was also the Main Selection of the Literary Guild. After Dark was a Book of the Month Club selection. The Burning Man, my fifth novel, published in August 1996, was the Main Selection of the Literary Guild and a Reader's Digest condensed book. My sixth novel, The Undertaker's Widow, was published in 1998 and was a Book of the Month Club selection. Wild Justice (HarperCollins, September 2000) was a Main Selection of the Literary Guild, a selection of the Book of the Month Club, and was nominated for an Oregon Book Award. The Associate was published by HarperCollins in August 2001, and Ties that Bind was published by HarperCollins in March 2003. My tenth novel, Sleeping Beauty, was published by HarperCollins on March 23, 2004. Lost Lake was published by HarperCollins in March 2005 and was nominated for an Oregon Book Award. Proof Positive was published by HarperCollins in July 2006. Executive Privilege was published by HarperCollins in May 2008 and in 2009 was given the Spotted Owl Award for the Best Northwest Mystery. Fugitive was published by HarperCollins on June 2, 2009. Willamette Writers gave me the 2009 Distinguished Northwest Writers Award. My latest novel, Supreme Justice, was published by HarperCollins in May 2010. My next novel, Capitol Murder, will come out in April 2012.

On October 11, 2011, HarperCollins will publish Vanishing Acts, my first Young Adult novel, which I wrote with my daughter, Ami Margolin Rome. Also in October, the short story "The Case of the Purloined Paget," which I wrote with my brother, Jerry, will be published by Random House in the anthology A Study in Sherlock.

In addition to my novels, I have published short stories and nonfiction articles in magazines and law journals. My short story "The Jailhouse Lawyer" was selected for the anthology The Best American Mystery Stories 1999. The House on Pine Terrace was selected for the anthology The Best American Mystery Stories 2010.

From 1996 to 2009 I was the president and chairman of the Board of Chess for Success. I am still heavily involved in the program, and returned to the board after a one-year absence in 2010. Chess for Success is a nonprofit charity that uses chess to teach study skills to elementary- and middle-school children in Title I schools . From 2007 to the present, I have been on the Board of Literary Arts, which sponsors the Oregon Book Awards, the Writers in the Schools program, and Portland Arts and Lectures.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By audrey TOP 500 REVIEWER on August 10, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was my first book by Phillip Margolin as well as my first mystery in the lawyer-as-detective genre. I thought the story was immediately interesting. The author introduced a lot of characters quickly but usually did so in a nonconfusing way while still writing the kind of details that make a fictional character come to life. I felt I knew a lot about them within a few paragraphs. Everything was written in the third person, and the action jumped around a lot; that made things move fast and it was interesting to read the experiences of several lawyers and detectives, a killer, a private detective etc. Characters were complex but in general I liked the good peple and didn't like the bad ones, and I like that. The story also moved around in time and this was done well.
In the book, we learn that a serial killer had murdered in New York state ten years prior. The killer always left a black rose and a note -- "Gone, But Not Forgotten". (One disappointing aspect to the book is that this idiosyncracy is never explained.) A decade later, the same M.O. is being used in a series of crimes in Portland, Oregon. This story is about how the people in Portland are looking for the killer and how people from the earlier investigation become involved.
This was an intelligent read and enjoyable. I will definitely read other books by this author.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Dianna on March 7, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am now a fan of Mr. Margolin, and will seek out his other books to read (I went out and purchased Sleeping Beauty this weekend.)

This was my first book by him, and noted that it has been compared to The Firm. I consider this much better, here's why. For me, I prefer thrillers to be thrilling. I prefer a little mystery with the horror that goes along with it. I really liked that he didn't make any part of this a romance and the characters were likeable (except for the killer of course!)

One thing that really struck me about this story is something that I cannot mention in the review so as not to give away a twist or the end, but there is a part of the tale that will shock you.

I highly recommend this book, and look forward to more by Mr. Margolin!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mark S. Winger on February 13, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Margolin does an excellent job of combining the legal thriller with the suspense thriller. You feel that Margolin stands on his own and doesn't become an imitation of other popular authors. If you are like me you have probably read all too many books that center around serial killings. You may feel that it's been written way too many times. Don't let any sentiment like that deter you from reading this book. Margolin does a very good job of portraying his characters and keeps you entertained throughout. The rewarding thing about this book is that it has a different twist to the killer concept. If you are a fan of Grisham or Cornwell you should like this book, so give it a try.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By john purcell on December 29, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Phillip Margolin has constructed a complex and exciting thriller with enough plot twists to keep the end in suspense until the last page. This is the first of his books that I have read, and I do not see why Margolin does not get the recognition accorded to Grisham or Ludlum, as he is clearly in that league.
In Gone, But Not Forgotten, two related crime stories, separated by 10 years and 3000 miles are unwoven simultaneously. In the New York and Oregon cases, the perpetrator is clearly a cunning genius, killing and kidnapping wives of prominent locals, but is it the same perpetrator in both cases? And if so, why was he able to move on to the second venue and repeat the crime spree?
Key characters are involved in both cases, but some have moved on and some are not able to let go. Why did the accused in the second case pick an unknown lawyer to represent him and who is that journalist that is bird-dogging the case? Even to the most casual observer, the ending to the first case would not be satisfactory to professional detectives and prosecutors, yet the case was definitively closed ten years ago.
In the end, it all comes clear and Margolin has added some unique legal twists. In what must be one of life's toughest choices, prosecutors and politicians are forced to decide quickly to what extent crimes can be forgiven in exchange for information that might help the living. We had a similiar case in Philadelphia fifteen years ago, where a DA was criticized for reducing charges against a child molester in exchange for information.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Andy Edie on March 29, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was the first book by Phillip Margolin that I have read. It was mostly a thriller, but some reviews hinted at a courtroom drama type thing.
It was defiantely a suspense/thriller. While the book was a very entertaining read, that moves along at a very quick pace, it is also very predictable.
Margolin throws in plot twists that, you, the reader, will find yourself suggesting before they happen. Still, this was a very exciting read. I unfortunately have this knack for plotting and development that ruins most mystery books and movies.
And for the ending, it was well drawn out and somewhat believable. I have read that Margolin should be compared to Grisham, but I don't think that is true. Grisham would have built up some suspense, and then ended the book on the last 2 pages. The endings have always been the worst thing about a Grisham novel. He always ends his books so abruptly, like running as fast as you can to the edge of the cliff, and then just falling.
Gone, But Not Forgotten is a fun book to read. If you like thrillers, or suspense books, then you should definatley read this.
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