Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.00
  • Save: $0.90 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 21? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by marcademus
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Trade pbk.; unmarked; no bent or torn pp.; cover and spine, fine.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Gone Primitive: Savage Intellects, Modern Lives Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0226808321 ISBN-10: 0226808327

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.10
$8.04 $0.01 $9.45

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Gone Primitive: Savage Intellects, Modern Lives + Paris Primitive: Jacques Chirac's Museum on the Quai Branly
Price for both: $38.48

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 335 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press (August 13, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226808327
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226808321
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #753,736 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In this interesting and unique study, the author looks at the West's appropriation of the images, styles, and ideas of primitive cultures for its own--and, she asserts, miscalculated--benefit. Examining the West's concept of the primitive as understood through such sources as Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan , the writings of Conrad and Lawrence, the theoretical work of Freud and Levi-Strauss, and the studies of a number of ethnographers/anthropologists, including Margaret Mead, she discovers an inaccurate, romanticized, often racist and sexist, and ultimately damaging series of ideas that have served to inform the West's concept of the primitive and to form the basis of its fascination. Although most of the author's suggestions for improving what she claims to be an unacceptable situation are so general and wide-ranging that they are practically cliches, the book provides a refreshing look at a topic that has not been previously examined in light of recent Western trends in art and culture.
- Jessica Grim, Univ. of California Lib., Berkeley
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chaichapz on September 12, 2011
Format: Paperback
A fascinating foray into the many representations of the primitive in
Western culture, from the perpetual Tarzan image to African masks to
D.H. Lawrence, Marianna Torgovnick moves effortlessly through
psychoanalysis, anthropology, popular culture, pornography and high
literary moments in history on a dazzling quest to explain the desires
and fears that fuel Western consumption of the idea "primitive."
I found this to be a highly readable and accessible book, particularly
the second essay "Taking Tarzan Seriously," which demands that we
understand the strategies and politics behind the Tarzan image. Part
feminist theory, part cultural archaeology, Gone Primitive is an
important read for anyone investigating issues that surround the
highly politicized act of "othering" and "consuming" minorities.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By T. Porges on June 9, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a good and useful book that attempts, in Gerald Graff's terms, to "teach the conflict," regarding the career of Primitivism as an aspect of Modernism. Recent battles over "primitive" have been particularly interesting, as they've been driven by ideological and class issues as well as the usual academic pettiness regarding vocabulary. The intensity with which the parties in this conflict grab at the imaginary high ground and wallop each other with boring prose and snotty asides is still interesting, because it's still happening. Like the _Bell Curve_ nonsense, it will not go away. But unlike that, and the "underclass" and social eugenics nonsense it serves, there is no good reason to pick a right and wrong side, here. So what I tend to look for is the interesting side. Who has something to say that doesn't bore me, and doesn't use boredom as a weapon? Torgovnick doesn't. The fight has gone on, and this book is no longer at the hot edge of it, but the disagreements continue and "scholarship" has not settled them. This book is a great place to look for a discussion of the issues. You might well argue with it, but that's largely what it's for.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is a great book and a fascinating topic -- the way that Western peoples react to "the other," from rejection to outright cultural theft. Content deals with everything from art and design to popular media portrayals of the "primitive," to scholarly works such as Margaret Mead's Samoan study.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 20 people found the following review helpful By B. Ball on May 27, 2005
Format: Paperback
After reading the preceding review of Mariana Torgovnick's book, I have to say that it is refreshing to see my views shared by another scholar. I agree that contemporary academic scholarship seems to be horribly behind the times. If I may be so bold to read between the lines of Andrew's comments, I might add that this is certainly the problem with post-colonial studies today. Post-colonialism, often synonymous with "multicultural studies" in academia, is quickly becoming a field whose views are revealing its own bias - and one that often shares a bias with colonialism. We are living in a time where the "us/them" mentality - whether argued to the negative or positive -

lacks the ability to see the complexity of the real issue in cultural studies, not to mention the issue itself. All that said, I certainly do not argue for imperialism as the alternative to post-colonialism; there is, _has been_ a more progressive arena of cultural studies that has become the new standard (for scholars) and new direction of cultural studies altogether. For the sake of brevity, see Homi Bhabha's _Location of Culture_ for a description of this direction that rids us once and for all of this base (and inherently imperialist) "us/them" rhetoric.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Andrew E. M. Baumann on May 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
It is an undoubtable and continuous commonplace in scholarship that as ideas spread out from the core of its discourse, from that table of conversation at which are seated those who most fully know both the subject of discourse and the nature of the discourse itself, as the ideas are passed from that table to those standing around it, and to those others in the room, then out and into the world, there is with the dissemination a dissipation in understanding. This is how it always has been, and there is no way around it. From a certain point of view, a optimistic one, this is how is should be -- for this is how understanding is to be given and developed: fully among those most fully able to understand, and in acceptable measures among those whose ability to digest can not yet handle that heavy a meat. That is in a way how Plato speaks of it in the _Republic_, with the ubiquitous example of the cave -- an example which in contemporary times is coated with a great, ironic humor, in that most excerptings of the story removes it from its greater context, successfully performing the exact opposite of what the allegory is meant to teach: that those who see the shadows as shadows should go out and teach those who can not.

Unfortunately, in contemporary scholarship, we are faced with a related problem that may not be particular to our time but does seems rather overabundant. The above dissemination and dissipation of understanding occurs within academia just as it does in general society. Unfortunately, there is little if any effort in academia these days (especially as concerns cultural studies) to distinguish quality of scholarship -- though one would think academia would have a stake in policing its own production.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa5439a44)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?