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Gone with the Wind (Four-Disc Collector's Edition)

3,140 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
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(Nov 17, 2009)
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70th Anniversary Edition
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(Apr 13, 2010)
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The Scarlett Edition
$15.20 $11.99
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$5.01 $0.38
(Nov 09, 2004)
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Collector's Edition
$19.94 $1.97
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Product Description

DVD Features: Disc 1 & 2 (The Film)
* Commentary by film historian Rudy Behlmer
* 5.1 Dolby Digital Soundtrack
* Original Mono Soundtrack

DVD Features: Disc 3
* The Making of a Legend: Gone With The Wind the acclaimed 1989 documentary made by Selznick's sons and narrated by Christopher Plummer (125 Minutes, Never-before-available on DVD)
* Restoring a Legend- An in-depth look at the restoration and Ultra-Resolution process utilized by Warner Bros. For this new DVD presentation
* Footage from 1939 Atlanta and 1961 Civil War Centennial Atlanta premieres
* The Old South - Fred Zinnerman directed this historical 1940 theatrical short, which was shown by MGM in theatres prior to the release of Gone With The Wind

DVD Features: Disc 4
* Melanie Remembers: Olivia de Havilland Recalls Gone With The Wind - All new documentary produced especially for this new DVD set, features Ms. de Havilland's personal recollections of the film
* Clark Gable: A King Remembered - A Portrait of the legendary actor's long and distinguished career as M-G-M's most famous leading man
* Vivien Leigh: Scarlett and Beyond hosted by Jessica Lange, this is an insightful look at Leigh's short and troubled life
* Mini documentaries covering lives and careers of the most prominent cast members

Additional Features

First off, if you're a GWTW fanatic, you must buy this four-disc collection. But then again, you probably don't need to read this to make that decision. For the rest of us, know that the kitchen-sink approach has been established here with two full discs of extras. The film's restoration under Warner's brilliant Ultra-Resolution process is the major contribution to the set. However, the bare-bones version released years ago isn't bad and the film still doesn't pop off the screen as do films from the headier days of Technicolor (like the earlier Ultra-Resolution DVD release of Meet Me in St. Louis). That said, the set is worthy of the most popular movie ever made. Rudy Behlmer's feature-length commentary is dry but an exhaustive reference guide to the entire history of the film. Need more? There's the excellent full-length documentary The Making of a Legend (1989) narrated by Christopher Plummer, plus two hour-long older biographies on the two main stars. There are many new vignettes on the rest of the cast, all narrated by Plummer (a nice touch to tie everything together). The new 30-minute interview/reminisce with Oliva de Havilland will be interesting to older fans, but tiresome for the younger set. The usual sort of trailers and premiere footage is here along with a curious short ("The Old South," directed by Fred Zinnemann) that was produced to help introduce the world to the history of the South. --Doug Thomas

Special Features

  • Ultra-Resolution film restoration
  • "The Making of a Legend: Gone With The Wind" the 1989 documentary made by Selznick's sons (125 Minutes)
  • "Restoring a Legend" - An in-depth look at the restoration
  • Footage from 1939 Atlanta and 1961 Civil War Centennial Atlanta premieres
  • "The Old South" - 1940 theatrical short directed by Fred Zinnerman
  • "Melanie Remembers: Olivia de Havilland Recalls Gone With The Wind" - All new documentary
  • "Clark Gable: A King Remembered"
  • "Vivien Leigh: Scarlett and Beyond"
  • Mini documentaries covering lives and careers of the most prominent cast members
  • Prologue from the international release version
  • Trailer gallery

Product Details

  • Actors: Clark Gable, Thomas Mitchell, Barbara O'Neil, Vivien Leigh, Evelyn Keyes
  • Directors: Victor Fleming, Sam Wood, George Cukor
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Box set, Closed-captioned, Collector's Edition, Color, Dolby, Original recording remastered, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 4
  • Rated: G (General Audience)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: November 9, 2004
  • Run Time: 238 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3,140 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0002V7TZ6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,007 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Gone with the Wind (Four-Disc Collector's Edition)" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

836 of 883 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin J Burgraff VINE VOICE on December 22, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
It seems like a 'new, improved' edition of "Gone With the Wind" has appeared every couple of years, offering the 'ultimate' in picture and sound reproduction, and extras. It can become expensive keeping up, and frustrating (much like buying a classic Disney DVD, when you know a more complete "Special Edition" will soon render your "First Time on Video" copy obsolete), but the new GWTW Four-Disc Collector's Edition most assuredly deserves a place in your collection.

First off, the picture and sound quality is astonishing. Warner's Ultra-Resolution process, which 'locks' the three Technicolor strips into exact alignment, provides a clarity and 'crispness' to the images that even the 1939 original print couldn't achieve. You'll honestly believe your TV is picking up HD, whether you're HD-ready, or not! This carries over to the Dolby Digital-remastered sound, as well. All of the tell-tale hiss and scratchiness of the opening credit title music, still discernable in the last upgrade, is gone, replaced by a richness of tone that will give your home theater a good workout. (Listen to the brass in this sequence, and you'll notice what I'm talking about...)

The biggest selling point of this edition is, of course, the two discs of additional features offered, and these are, in general, superb.
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352 of 385 people found the following review helpful By William Sommerwerck VINE VOICE on November 17, 2009
Format: Blu-ray
As with the "Wizard of OZ" BD set, the GWTW set is elaborated -- and made "spendier" -- with the addition of material that might not be absolutely necessary for one's enjoyment. The box is covered in red velvet flocking (green would have been more appropriate and amusing -- qv, Carol Burnett). There's a CD "sampler" of Max Steiner's score, running a measly 45 minutes. Given that Max took excessive scoring to the max (Bette Davis had some pointedly unkind things to say about it), a "sampler" could have filled two CDs, and still not have exhausted the music (though the music might exhaust you). *

As with "OZ", there's a 52-page hard-backed book that's largely content-free, plus reproductions of some of the watercolor set-design paintings (in their own little envelope), and various memoranda sent to and from David O. Selznick. I was expecting a reproduction of Gerald O'Hara's pocket watch, but it likely would have been of even poorer quality than the kiddie watch in the "OZ" box.

The best bonus is a reproduction of the 25-cent (expensive in 1939) souvenir booklet. It includes pieces by the principals, notably one from Clark Gable telling how badly he wanted to play Rhett Butler and much he enjoyed every minute of making the film. (He didn't want to appear in "costume" films (having had bad luck in a film about Irish revolutionaries), was afraid to take on a role the public had such definite ideas about, and got along poorly with the first director, George Cukor.)

As I write this, I haven't viewed all the supplemental material on the second disk. (There's a lot.) The third disk duplicates the "When the Lion Roars" feature included in the "OZ" box -- though the package labeling suggests it's unique to GWTW.
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337 of 387 people found the following review helpful By D. Paul Dalton on November 30, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I do hope you'll return and revise your rating to a '5' once you digest this information:

Gone With the Wind was never released in a Widescreen version on DVD because it was never released in a Widescreen version on film. In fact, when it was released (1939), there were NO "Widescreen" movies at all -- becaues no one had yet thought about formatting movies in that way.

Through the 1940s and into the 1950s, essentially ALL movies were in the 3:4 format that we now consider to be "regular". My understanding is that those proportions originally were adopted by the film industry to roughly correspond with the proportions of viewable area for the "live" theaters extant when the film industry started. Similarly, when television arrived in the late 40s/early 50s, its screen format was determined by copying the 3:4 screen proportions of films made up to that time. By the mid-1950s, the film industry became concerned about losing its audience to TV, so various WIDESCREEN formats (CinemaScope was one; I think there was another called VistaVision; I can't remember the others offhand) were conceived by the film industry in the 1950s as a way in which the film industry could distinguish its film products from what could efficiently be shown on television screens. This was the film industry's attempt to keep audiences coming to theaters to see their movies, rather than just waiting to see movie productions on home televisions; by coming to the theater, the audience could experience something different that what television could offer.
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Blu-ray Reviews Mixed With DVD Reviews.
i couldnt agee with you more i am sick and tired of this i did call amazon one year ago about this and they said they are working on it i dont think they work too hard.
Feb 21, 2010 by BOB SZVETICS |  See all 10 posts
Deleted Scenes
If your VHS came in a box, it is the entire film. Actually, I never saw a cut "TV" version. Twenty years ago, the VHS box sets cost 100 bucks a pop. Why in the world would you honestly think that you had an incomplete copy of the film from a box set?
Aug 4, 2008 by A. Danovi |  See all 9 posts
Still has cut, from the original!!!
I think you are imagining things. GWTW has not been cut since its release. Unless you saw the sneak preview.
Nov 4, 2007 by Plymouth 58 |  See all 12 posts
gwtw blu-ray
Wendy - I would only suggest you compare the picture on the DVD version of GWTW to the picture on the blu-ray of Adventures of Robin Hood and I think you will be sold on this new set. In addition to being blu-ray I read that Warner Brothers has yet again remastered this film through their... Read More
Apr 29, 2009 by J. Tommassello |  See all 18 posts
special features different than the 60th anniversary edition?
apparently due for release on 17th november with these special features:
Disc 1 The Movie, Part 1
Remastered feature with Dolby Digital 5.1 Audio
Commentary by historian Rudy Behlmer
Disc 2 The Movie, Part 2
Remastered feature
Commentary by historian Rudy Behlmer
Offer for a numbered Limited... Read More
Aug 10, 2009 by Michael Eldicott |  See all 4 posts
Gone With the wind dvds Be the first to reply
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