Gone with the Wind and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Gone with the Wind-MAY, 1936 FIRST EDITION Hardcover – 1936


See all 91 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, 1936
$69.99

"Funny Girl" by Nick Hornby
"One of the funniest and most subtle voices in contemporary fiction."--Chicago Tribune. Check out Nick Hornby's first novel in 5 years: Funny Girl. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1037 pages
  • Publisher: MacMillan; 2nd Printing December 1936 edition (1936)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001ECGWBE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,718 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,379,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

When I first read Gone with the wind many years ago at age 25, I had watched the movie many times and loved it.
Rhonda Elkins
Characters such as Scarlett O'Hara's love interest Ashley, her bestfriend/worst enemy Melanie (Ashley's wife), and of course the sly Rhett Butler.
James Hobson Jr.
Margaret Mitchell did an excellent job of weaving her fictional story against the historical backdrop of a war torn South during the Civil War.
Patricia Hatten

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

149 of 160 people found the following review helpful By Misfit VINE VOICE on August 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
I would give this 10 stars if I could. I haven't read this since I was a young girl in the early 70's and should never have waited so long to read it again. The characters were exceptionally well drawn, the dialogue was brilliant, particularly between Rhett (SIGH!) and Scarlett. I swear there was sparks flying off the pages. I am going to miss the people I will have to put behind me now that the book has come to an end, Rhett (SIGH), Scarlett, Mammy, Prissy and Aunt Pitty Pat (LOL).

The author's use of prose was beautiful, all the scenes and action came alive for me. Some people seem to be offended by the racism in the book, but that's how things were back then. Sugar coating it would have ruined the story reducing it to a Harlequin romance.

This is an incredibly well written book about the death of a civilization and the struggles to survive in the new era. This is a book that should not be missed, particulary those who enjoy historical fiction.
17 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
166 of 183 people found the following review helpful By Mark Blackburn on March 17, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It took this reviewer half a century to get around to reading this great novel for the first time! Appreciating it then, with 'fresh eyes' I share the view that "Gone With The Wind" is quite simply the most readable long novel of all time. With world-wide sales nudging 25 million, it's probably fair to say that most first-time readers (apart from the odd reviewer here at the world's biggest web site) have shared that opinion in the almost 70 years since Margaret Mitchell wrote her one-and-only book. At least one other, highly readable novelist of the past century, the late James A. Michener certainly felt that way.

I'm recalling an interview of thirty years ago in which Michener - a master storyteller in his own right - expressed awe at Mitchell's achievement. I remember Michener quoted a long-forgotten critic who greeted the book's release in 1936 with the perfect, one-sentence summing up: "It's the shortest long novel I have ever read!" Michener predicted at that time (1975) that "critics will forever have to grapple with the problem of why Margaret Mitchell's novel has remained so readable, and so important to so many people."

Michener singled out a few of the "super-dramatic confrontations" so perfectly conjured up in Mitchell's lucid, timeless writing style: Mammy lacing Scarlett into her corset; the wounded at the railway station; Scarlett shooting the Union straggler; the girls making Scarlett a dress from the moss-green velvet draperies; Rhett carrying his wife upstairs to the long-unused bedroom.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 47 people found the following review helpful By James Wood on September 6, 2007
Format: Hardcover
"Gone With the Wind," as a novel, has been mistakenly dismissed by literary critics as pulp fiction for the masses. This view is premature and biased, in my opinion. If one digs deeply into the fabric of this very complex novel, one is likely to find that this novel works on two very different levels: the external level, in which themes such as survival and romantic love figure prominently; and the internal level, in which themes such as division v. reunion and the child v. the adult figure prominently.

An external analysis of the novel yields much that has been obvious to the reading and movie-going public for years. "Gone With the Wind" is, most obviously, a very powerful novel about a young woman's survival of two unique crises: the American Civil War and Reconstruction of the South that followed. The personal qualities of those who survive and prosper in this novel -- characters such as Scarlett O'Hara, Rhett Butler, Mammy, Will Benteen, old Mrs. Fontaine, even Mrs. Merriwether -- are contrasted sharply with those who do not survive and prosper: Ashley Wilkes, Ellen O'Hara, Gerald O'Hara, and Scarlett's first two husbands, Charles Hamilton and Frank Kennedy.

Melanie Hamilton presents an interesting study in the story of survival. Margaret Mitchell uses her to represent the dignified stateliness of the Old South matron. Rather than becoming a victim of the Old South's disintegration, she survives in a way that equals or even surpasses Scarlett's survival.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
59 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Daniel on February 16, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Margaret Mitchell wrote, for her first book (an earlier work, called "Lost Laysen" has since been published), an exhaustingly researched, wide-ranging, exciting and thrilling book set in the Civil War. This book - Gone With The Wind - was a runaway success; and ultimately made into the biggest movie of its day. Alright, let's admit it, by modern standards it's sexist, racist, overblown, and melodramatic. And it's pretty darned brilliant. I have read this book no less than ten times! In theory, one ought to detest that spoiled little brazen, Scarlett O'Hara, but Margaret Mitchell makes her into a vivid, strong human being, a woman with spirit and the will to survive, but who was essentially immature and spoilt. But she was fiercely protective, loyal, and someone who you were forced to admire, even as you disliked what she was doing. She also had a alarming propensity to fall in love with the wrong men - this was a woman doomed to claw her way anywhere to succeed, but at the same time, estranging herself in the eyes of her Society. But does she give up, does she make it a tragedy? No. She gets up and keeps going, she just doesn't let people see that she minds it very much. She is an inspiration, but she doesn't really deserve to be. Scarlett is flawed, hideously so, but none the less, we are forced to admire her. She IS the book. A weaker or less flawed heroine would be irritating or just TOO unsympathetic. Her unrequitted love is very believable, it's happened to most of us at one time in our youth, and we never really quite shake that first infatuation off without a rude or painful awakening.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?