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Goo [Vinyl]


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Goo
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Vinyl, April 16, 1996
$312.99
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sonic youth the eternal

The Eternal is Sonic Youth’s 2009 celebration of newfound freedom. After many years signed to an ever precarious corporate label, the band has been liberated and is releasing this CD with their friends at Matador. Inspirations ran high in preparation for the recording. Abandoning the time tested routine of writing and rehearsing a cycle of songs in one time ... Read more in Amazon's Sonic Youth Store

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Product Details

  • Vinyl (April 16, 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Mobile Fidelity
  • ASIN: B000000EPS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,405,494 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Dirty Boots
2. Tunic (Song for Karen)
3. Mary-Christ
4. Kool Thing
5. Mote
6. My Friend Goo
7. Disappearer
8. Mildred Pierce
9. Cinderella's Big Score
10. Scooter + Jinx
11. Titanium Exposé

Customer Reviews

It's really good, if you're wondering.
Thomas Carroll
Like all great Sonic Youth albums, Goo manages to simultaneously give an immediate pure noise thrill, whilst ceaselessly pushing the boundary of popular music.
O Waddock Hunt
I've only just decided to get into them and buy one of their albums, and this is it.
Mono-Grind

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Scott Bresinger on April 27, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This would be album number six (depending on your counting method) by the Greatest American Rock Band of the last 25 years. This particular edition is a super-deluxe two-disc reissue of the album. whether you're a fan of the original version or a curious newcomer, this is definitely the version to get, unless you have budgetary concerns, in which case the original will do just fine. Still, my motto is: "if you're going to go for it, go all the way!" I realize that's a moronic cliche, but in a country in which morons like Kevin Federline are more famous than Sonic Youth, sometimes it's rewarding to dumb down. I'll save the lecture about the ethical implications stemming from this for later. Now's the time for "Goo."

"Goo" found the band at the apex of their "pop culture can be fun" phase from the late 80's/early 90's, when they started dressing more fashionably (well, at least Kim Gordon did) and started storming MTV and the then-burgeoning alt-rock radio format. It's also no coincidence that "Goo" was also the band's official major label debut ("Daydream Nation," which was released by the indie Enigma, had major label distribution). Thus begun their long association with DGC, an album that at one point was rumored to be called, um, a slang term also known as a "Lewinsky." The music was also getting slightly poppier as well. Of course, for Sonic Youth, "pop" meant taking a standard verse-chorus-verse structure and slathering it with their trademark oddly-tuned and feedback-spewing guitars. They also embraced pop-cultural themes, or at least those that resonated with them. The album's lead single, "Kool Thing" reflected Kim's post-feminist fascination with the male bravado of hip-hop.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Scott Hedegard on March 24, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Inspired by the New York art scene, Sonic Youth bludgeoned their way into the rock and roll world courtesy of SST Records, which handled all their material up to "Goo", which is now considered an alt-rock classic.

Sonic Youth specialize in a peculiar blend of detuned and unconventionally tuned guitars, swirling in feedback, distortion and volume. Far from being nothing but a metallic shriek, SY somehow manage to work in bits of beauty, albeit the kind that extra-terrestrials probably dig, a solid beat thanks to Steve Shelley, one of rock's best drummers, and vocals that scream, moan, whisper and croon.

"Dirty Boots" opens with an almost ethereal intro until bassist Kim Gordon bulls her way in with fuzz bass and Thurston Moore and Lee Ranaldo slam away at their guitars, creating sounds that captivate as well as maim.

We progress through a homage to Karen Carpenter (!?), a guest rap by Chuck D. and a glorious feedback symphony with "Mote" that churns and burns, making the listener fear his stereo may overload and combust into flames.

"Disappearer" is the most accessible tune before closing with "Scooter + Jinx" and "Titanium Exposure".

"Goo" and Sonic Youth are not for the faint hearted. Music should reflect all our emotions and SY, with every release, somehow capture the sound of chaos, the beauty of parallel worlds and lyrics of urban life. The fact that they have survived for a couple of decades now shows that there is a need for this special kind of noise in each one of us.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Synthesis_jason on October 25, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Released in June of 1990 as the follow-up to Daydream Nation - the album that placed Sonic Youth at the top of the late `80s independent rock scene - Goo was the band's major label debut with Geffen. Given the Deluxe Edition treatment, this pivotal work is now available in a remastered form with bonus tracks and a second disc of extras.

The original album - nicely freshened up by John Golden - is strung together with heavy doses of Sonic Youth's signature dissonance; however, the bizarre tunings and jagged distortion are crammed into tight song structures, making this one of their most accessible efforts. Essential tracks like "Dirty Boots," "Mote" and "Kool Thing" (featuring Public Enemy's Chuck D) may be dated, but remain potent, assaulting rock clichés with an art-school cynicism.

The Deluxe Edition package includes widely bootlegged 8-track demos from Goo featuring Dinosaur Jr.'s J Mascis and a handful of unreleased tracks. The demos aren't wildly different than the finished product, but they do provide a more immediate and raw take on the songs. And of the previously unreleased material, only "Lee #2" - a stripped down, poetic outtake written and sung by guitarist Lee Ranaldo - is particularly noteworthy. However, the liner notes make for a good read, providing a nice snapshot of the group at that tumultuous time in pop music history.

Goo may not be Sonic Youth's best, but it's undoubtedly an important album in their career and proves that an experimental underground band could make the major label jump without sacrificing their credibility. For that reason alone, it's nice to see Goo get paid the respect it deserves.

James Barone

Synthesis.net
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gala_HateMachine on April 15, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Ok, so yes, this is an album hated by an important part of the Sonic Youth fans cos its said to be the sellout one... I dunno... it may be a sellout deal, but the music is definetely S.Y.! Even better, this is not just the usual cacophony based on Glenn Branca we all love and know since the Sonic Youth EP hit some stores. This time there's melody (the good kind of!) all around the place (The chorus in "Mote"!), all the mallet guitar techniques and the crazy feedback-chimes take unto a whole new concept here, ridden by Kim's ever-excellent bass playing into Steve's paws. I am finding it hard to describe how much of a superior album this one is among the others. It fills the air with excitement, coolness, a soft sexuality and most of all, freedom. It is excactly what you need when you know its gonna be a long day. Every song is a new door, with an infinity of new things to see behind it... I can only think of ONE way to make this album better than flawlessly divine would be adding "The Diamond Sea" (from Wasing Machine) to the track list.
Hope this can open your eyes to the best in music.
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