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Good in Bed (Cannie Shapiro Book 1) Kindle Edition

4 out of 5 stars 1,060 customer reviews

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Length: 400 pages Word Wise: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

It is temping at first but unwise to assume Candace Shapiro is yet another Bridget Jones. Feisty, funny and less self-hating than her predecessor, Cannie is a 28-year-old Philadelphia Examiner reporter preoccupied with her weight and men, but able to see the humor in even the most unpleasant of life's broadsides. Even she is floored, however, when she reads "Good in Bed," a new women's magazine column penned by her ex-boyfriend, pothead grad student Bruce Guberman. Three months earlier, Cannie suggested they take a break apparently, Bruce thought they were through and set about making such proclamations as, "Loving a larger woman is an act of courage in our world." Devastated by this public humiliation, Cannie takes comfort in tequila and her beloved dog, Nifkin. Bruce has let her down like another man in her life: Cannie's sadistic, plastic surgeon father emotionally abused her as a young girl, and eventually abandoned his wife and family, leaving no forwarding address. Cannie's siblings suffer, especially the youngest, Lucy, who has tried everything from phone sex to striptease. Their tough-as-nails mother managed to find love again with a woman, Tanya, the gravel-voiced owner of a two-ton loom. Somehow, Cannie stays strong for family and friends, joining a weight-loss group, selling her screenplay and gaining the maturity to ask for help when she faces something bigger than her fears. Weiner's witty, original, fast-moving debut features a lovable heroine, a solid cast, snappy dialogue and a poignant take on life's priorities. This is a must-read for any woman who struggles with body image, or for anyone who cares about someone who does.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Weiner's first novel should satisfy readers from older teens and above. Cannie Shapiro is in her late twenties, funny, independent, and a talented reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer. After a "temporary" break-up with her boyfriend of three years, she reads his debut column, "Good in Bed," in the women's magazine Moxie. Titled "Loving a Larger Woman," this very personal piece triggers events that completely transform her and those around her. Cannie's adventures will strike a chord with all young women struggling to find their place in the world, especially those larger than a size eight. Despite some events that stretch credulity and a few unresolved issues at the end, this novel follows the classic format of chasing the wrong man when the right one is there all along. Veteran storyteller Maeve Binchy gave us Bennie in Circle of Friends; now Jennifer Weiner gives us Cannie. Look for more books from Weiner. Rebecca Sturm Kelm, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 4257 KB
  • Print Length: 400 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0743418174
  • Publisher: Atria Books; Reprint edition (April 2, 2002)
  • Publication Date: April 2, 2002
  • Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FC0PBW
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,288 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Jennifer Weiner is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of twelve books, including Good in Bed, In Her Shoes, which was made into a major motion picture, and Who Do You Love. A graduate of Princeton University and contributor to the New York Times Opinion section, Jennifer lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I must confess that I was predisposed to like "Good in Bed," since I've been a big fan of Jennifer Weiner's newspaper columns for some time. I wasn't, however, prepared for how fine a first novel she has produced, or how moved I was by Cannie's story. The book begins with a hilarious hook: protagonist Cannie Shapiro, entertainment columnist for a large Philadelphia newspaper, realizes that her recently-ex-boyfriend has been hired by a Cosmo-like magazine to write a [adult] column. To her horror, Cannie realizes that the pseudo-anonymous woman "C." in Bruce's first article is her. To make this invasion of privacy even more humiliating, the column is an unexpectedly perceptive treatment of Cannie's weight problem and its effect on their relationship. At first glance, one might assume the snarky tone of the first few pages would continue as the novel spun out in a kind of lightweight revenge fantasy. But Weiner uses Cannie's heartbreaking invasion of privacy as jumping off point for so much more. We see Cannie grow and change, exorcising childhood demons (mostly), getting over Bruce (at last), and most moving of all, finally coming to terms with her place in life (and yes, her weight, too). If the plot is moved along by a few too many incredible coincidences, if the book seems almost too jam-packed with characters and subplots, well, these are minor criticisms of a finely-written and sensitive first novel. Just promise me, Jennifer, you won't let Camryn Manheim star in the movie version.......
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Format: Paperback
Like others who hated this book, I really wanted to enjoy it. Like the main character, I'm a fat word-lover, often too smart and sarcastic for my own good, who considered the Pink Rose Bakery in Philadelphia a second home. Unfortunately, I spent most of my time screaming at this book, and when I was finally finished I threw it against my wall. On the one hand, I admire the author for presenting a full-figured, flawed character. However, Cannie, the heroine, remains self-centered, self-pitying, immature, judgmental, condesceding, elitist, and cruel throughout the whole book, and is repeatedly indulged by friends, loved ones, and worst of all the author, Jennifer Weiner. Weiner allows Cannie to dance through life without having to take responsibility for herself, and the "redemption" she experiences rings false. Worse, the book is littered with cliches, including, most offensively, a lesbian with two cats named Gertrude and Alice, who is reviled by Cannie and her siblings even though it may be the closest her mother has come to a partner in her life. I pity the lesbian reader who reads this book and encounters such a one-dimensional, snide rendering of a stereotype.
A thing that aggravates me about reviews of this book is that many claim it's better than Bridget Jones because the character is heavier, a "real fat woman." I found Bridget a lot more likeable, regardless of her weight, because you got to see her standing by her friends. Cannie seems to have friends who treat her a lot better than she treats them, or herself. While I'm sure that the author saw Cannie as very kind, the glimpses of a loving Cannie are few and far between her monologues of self-loathing.
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Format: Hardcover
The premise of this novel is excellent: after all the 'thin is best' propaganda, including that propagated by Jane Green's 'Jemima J', it's great to see a book which not only criticises the anti-fat culture in our world today, but argues that it's not necessary to be thin in order to be loved.
Cannie is in her twenties, an averagely-successful journalist on a city paper, just taking a breathing-space from a three-year relationship with Bruce... and is fat. Which, she claims, does not bother her, though we, the readers, suspect that this isn't the case. Then the bombshell strikes: Bruce has just got a column with a popular national women's magazine, and his first column is entitled 'Loving a Larger Woman'. And guess what? It's about him and Cannie, to whom he refers as his ex.
Cannie has never thought of herself as a larger woman until this point. And the article is crueller still: it begins 'I will never forget the day I discovered that my girlfriend weighs more than me.' And finishes: 'Loving a larger woman is an act of courage in the modern world'.
Naturally, she is humiliated, and the relationship is now completely over. Too late, she reads the full article, only to discover that it wasn't cruel after all, that Bruce understood her insecurities and hang-ups only too well all along, and that he loved her regardless of them. Her weight was an issue with her, not with him, and his reference to loving her being an act of courage meant that she, not him, made it difficult for them to be together because she could never quite convince herself that he loved her.
This is an extraordinary article, written with sensitivity and feeling. So here's my first problem with the book: we're supposed to believe that Bruce is an insensitive, uncaring loser. Huh? The guy who wrote that article?
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Format: Paperback
The only good thing about this book is that it makes me think I can quit my full-time job and write fiction novels, because apparently people will read anything. The main character is completely miserable. I also don't like the way she disparages against her mother's partner (and her mother), it borders on lesbian-bashing. I wouldn't be able to recommend this book to anyone other than to have them read it to see how even such poorly written material can do well these days. This book is a definite skip.
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What books do you read over and over again?
Hi Eli,
I'm a Bookaholic too : )
I'm so tired of the same type's of tv shows on these days, so I started to read more lately. I of course love Jane Austen, and The Stephenie Meyer books (my 5th time reading them, lol) I recently read 'The Shack 'by W.M. Paul Young and re-read it for questions... Read More
Apr 30, 2009 by Desert Summer |  See all 7 posts
crush dot com: Manhattan, not Philadelphia Be the first to reply
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