Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $6.05 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Good-Bye Hardcover – July 8, 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$18.90
$13.86 $4.55


Frequently Bought Together

Good-Bye + Abandon the Old in Tokyo
Price for both: $32.69

Buy the selected items together
  • Abandon the Old in Tokyo $13.79

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Drawn and Quarterly; 1st Hardcover Ed edition (July 8, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1897299370
  • ISBN-13: 978-1897299371
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 6.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #413,033 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Tatsumi has been called the grandfather of Japanese alternative comics, and this third collection of his stories shows why. Tatsumi takes on subjects as difficult as the legacy of Hiroshima, incest and the sexual humiliations of postwar Japanese soldiers, yet is never exploitative. Instead, the stories humanize all of the characters involved. Tatsumi excels at depicting honest human reactions to complex situations, and he refuses to rely on a single style of storytelling. The first story, Hell, is a brief masterpiece. A freelance photojournalist snaps a picture of one of the infamous Hiroshima shadows—shadows of people burnt into the walls by the intensity of the atomic blast. The shadow appears to be a boy rubbing his mother's back, but years later, the photographer learns the awful truth behind the scene. By contrast, Just a Man forgoes the O. Henry twist, instead telling a circular slice-of-life story about the quiet despair of a Japanese salaryman. Rash, a brief story of a man afflicted with a psychosomatic skin condition, reads as if Haruki Murakami decided to try his hand at manga. Tatsumi's art is masterful: he switches art styles from cartoony manga to stark realism with ease and is equally adept at depicting graceful motion, grisly suffering and complicated emotion. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

The 1971–72 stories in Tomine’s third collection of vintage works by revolutionary manga artist Tatsumi portray a society haunted by loss and mired in resignation in the quarter-century following World War II. Although Tatsumi typically depicts malaise-entrapped protagonists without spelling out the social causes of their despondency, several tales here are uncharacteristically political, set just after the war and addressing its actual effect or, more precisely, that of Japan’s face-losing defeat on the characters rather than only suggesting it. In the harrowing “Good-Bye,” a woman turns to prostitution with American soldiers, while her father heedlessly exploits her situation. In “Hell,” a photographer finds his life’s meaning in a photo he took in A-bombed Hiroshima but learns the harsh truth behind the image decades later. In other stories, a henpecked man decides to squander his squirreled-away savings on a prostitute, a bar hostess remains faithful to her imprisoned boyfriend, and a retired salaryman suffers a mysterious rash. Tatsumi’s mastery of the visual simplicity of classic manga gives a stark power to these devastating, uncompromising pieces. --Gordon Flagg

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 11 customer reviews
“Good-Bye” is a collection of short stories told in Manga.
Vivek Tejuja
Depressing stuff, to be sure, but brilliant in the same way that Mishima's stories are brilliant.
Robert Beveridge
Tatsumi has a way of bringing readers into his art with his gorgeous drawings and shading.
animate ~

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By animate ~ on August 31, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The selections for D&Q's third Tatsumi publishing were mostly taken from 1971 or '72, around the time that he was moving away from rental comics (similar to rental movies in America) and into magazine publishing, which impacted his work greatly.

The stories are mostly concerned with the daily nuances of life; many of the stories end on the exact note that they begin on. Some of them are less serious in tone, but the first ("HELL") and last ("GOOD-BYE") are especially unnerving in one way or another. Without giving too much away, I'll say that the first story immediately brought me into Hiroshima and its aftermath. Tatsumi has a way of bringing readers into his art with his gorgeous drawings and shading. The writing itself is superb, too, with themes being more adult oriented ("gekiga") than typical shonen manga.

War, sex, murder, mystery, fetishism -- Tatsumi covers all the bases of the Japanese underbelly, and in this third volume goes more political than before. This is highly recommended.

His next publishing will be "A DRIFTING LIFE", an 820 page autobiographical work involving a post-war adolescent growing into a budding manga artist.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've enjoyed all of Tatsumi's published work (that is in English), and purchased the books for my small library. His art provides social commentary in a rare form that could be considered *extremely* offensive to some -- fair warning!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Yun on October 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Kudos to Drawn & Quarterly and Adrian Tomine for bringing Yoshihiro Tatsumi's work to the US! Good-Bye is the third collection of Tatsumi's short stories and each collection just gets better. Tatsumi's style that mixes realistic backgrounds with cartoon characters works so well. His stories are darker than typical manga of the time, yet they are so relevant in the present day. I hope D&Q continues to publish his work here.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert Beveridge HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 30, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Yoshihro Tatsumi, Good-Bye (Drawn and Quarterly, 2008)

With every collection of Yoshihiro Tatsumi stories that Drawn and Quarterly releases, I find myself becoming more and more enamored of the man's work. I wasn't really sure that was possible; after all, D&Q's first Tatsumi collection, The Push Man and Other Stories, made my beat-reads-of-the-year list back a couple of years ago. But, yes, they just keep getting better. Good-Bye, which collects pieces Tatsumi wrote in the early- to mid-seventies, does something I'm not sure I thought was possible where manga is concerned: it shows that it's possible for an artist to come up with overtly political stories in the genre that actually still work as stories. Difficult to do in any artistic medium, and thus all the more impressive when they actually work. (Don't try this at home, kiddies; Tatsumi is a professional's professional, and he makes it look easy, rather like Bukowski does with poetry. He gets a lot of bad imitators, too.) If you're familiar with Tatsumi, you've got some idea of what to expect; the characters here are on the fringes and in the lower classes of society, for the most part, and are being acted on by forces over which they have little, if any, control; there are few positive resolutions in a book written by Tatsumi. Depressing stuff, to be sure, but brilliant in the same way that Mishima's stories are brilliant. The destination is not somewhere you want to be, but the journey is exquisite. Drawn and Quarterly's next Tatsumi project is a nine-hundred-page autobiographical comic; I, for one, can't wait. **** ½
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Roy Clark on October 8, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This bound book of early japanese comics isn't as entertaining as it is informative. The comics are
grim symbols of a culture recovering from war, reconstructing both cultures and minds. As such, they're more sociology than frivolity.

They're aiming for shock effect, reflecting the cynicism of post-war Japan. Neurotic and erotic in stark black and white renditions their emotions are readily apparent. Anger, frustration and disappointments mark every story. But the harsh art conveying the hopelessness of the characters does cause one to think about how wars go on long after a truce is signed.

Many fine anti-war/post WWII movies cover the same ground.
This one comes to mind: Red Angel It offers
the same kind of angst and hopeless anger from an adjacent
time period. Akira Kurosawa also has several films on this dark
topic.

. . . Not for young people; Maybe just for comics
academics/historians or WWII vets on either side.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Manga is an art that grows on you. It is also an art form that makes you appreciate the beauty of stillness and subtlety. So when there are graphic novels to be read, there is also Manga which I feel is quite different and a genre of its own than being classified under Graphic Novels. Tatsumi happened to me when I was browsing through Landmark, Bombay, about ten years ago with a very dear friend. That was another book. This time I spotted him at Blossom and could not have been more excited. I knew I had to buy it and I was not wrong about it at all.

“Good-Bye” is a collection of short stories told in Manga. Tatsumi is perhaps one writer that just brings out the best when it comes to Manga, or at least from all that I have read. Tatsumi in this collection portrays a Japanese society – during WWII, in the aftermath of the atomic bomb and post the war.

The stories are about trapped protagonists, who seem to have no choice at all. They are stuck in circumstances that are beyond their control and they have to make sense of the world around them. Right from “Hell” which is about post-Hiroshima attack to “Good-Bye” which is a story of a woman trying to survive after the war, by using her body – the stories are real and laced with pathos and sometimes tragic humour.

What struck me the most was how beautifully Tatsumi managed to bring out the emotions in the entire book. From anger to helplessness to pure love and longing, everything is meticulously laid out for the reader to savour and add in a bit of his or her angst as well. All in all, this book is meant to be relished, page by page, illustration by illustration.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?