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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rihanna's new CD is the first R and B CD that I was ever interested in purchasing.
Generally, one buys a CD and only likes to listen to one or two tracks. With Rihanna's CD "Good Girl Gone Bad" every track is different and , I think sets a new genre for music. It crosses over from R and B to light rock. A great deal of thought was put into the order of the tracks. The lyrics are full of meaning. It is a compilation of love songs, angst and confusion. I...
Published on October 15, 2008 by Miriam Hope Brown

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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three and a half stars for the beautiful Rihanna!
Upon picking up Good Girl Gone Bad, the third and most recent album by the excruciatingly beautiful 19-year-old Barbados dancehall reggae singer Rihanna (born: Robyn Rihanna Fenty), I slightly cringed at the album's title, thinking she had gone the route of most pop diva starlets (i.e. Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, Lindsay Lohan, Jessica Simpson, etc.) by thinking...
Published on June 8, 2007 by amerdale876


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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rihanna's new CD is the first R and B CD that I was ever interested in purchasing., October 15, 2008
This review is from: Good Girl Gone Bad: Reloaded (Audio CD)
Generally, one buys a CD and only likes to listen to one or two tracks. With Rihanna's CD "Good Girl Gone Bad" every track is different and , I think sets a new genre for music. It crosses over from R and B to light rock. A great deal of thought was put into the order of the tracks. The lyrics are full of meaning. It is a compilation of love songs, angst and confusion. I am 48 and an old rock n' roller. This CD is a crossover for me. I would highly recommend this CD.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bad Girl's gone Good, November 24, 2008
OK, the other two reviewers have a bone to pick with Amazon, Pepsi points and other things completely unrelated to Rihanna's music. If you like Rihanna, this is an excellent album. Not many to choose from yet, being a young artist. But, IMHO this is a better album than her first "Music of the Sun", which is not an insult of her debut either. I almost gave this 5 stars just to counter the crappy, unrealistic and unrelated reviews provided by the other two people here.... but I resisted. This really is a 4 star album, with solid music, vocals, and production. if you've heard of and like Rihanna, you'll like Good Girl Gone Bad.
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36 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Song of the summer and a solid album., June 5, 2007
By 
A* (New York, N.Y. United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Good Girl Gone Bad (Audio CD)
Rihanna has finally made a solid album, almost void of her nasal tick of notes and need to have herself above the sound mix. Now with the right production, hello -- echo effect in play during "Umbrella" (a song Mary J. Blige turned down, yeah, kick yourself hard for that one, girl). Rihanna has dropped the too-sweet Island sun music that she never quite American-ized to have a run away hit and is able to avoid working with Teairra Marie at the food court.

With the exception of the horrible slow jams that try to cater to her as if she had a strong voice, Rihanna does well with the sassy jams like "Lemme Get That" with its call to take every dime a man has on furniture instead of spending her own cash to do so ... why not have him buy the house too then? Even "Don't Stop the Music" which samples Michael Jackson's chant/call from "Wanna Be Startin' somethin'" is dipped in a little of reggae while still allowing her to cross over. It's nice to see her growing into her own, even though it is with massive help from studio production.

In the past, it seems as if she had been searching for an image, this sassy, sweet vibe suits her well. Even the film-noir album cover works. The only riff: when she fails, she fails hard! Slow jams just aren't her strong note, when its too much of a vocal push for her. Its like telling Ciara to go out there and belt -- not gonna happen. Rihanna has made an excellent summer album that'll stick on the charts for a long time or until Beyonce gets Jealous and tells her to sit down.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ultimate edition to get for club music fans and Rihanna completists, July 3, 2007
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How often do we get a new CD release by an artist issued in a special edition with a bonus disc of FULL LENGTH club mixes of almost every song on the album from the uptempo tracks to the slow jams, remixed by some of the biggest names on the dance charts? That's exactly what you get here. Naturally, the big attraction is the full length version of the Haji & Emanuel mix of Umbrella, which was in an edited form on the CD single. But you also get mixes by Soul Seekerz, Steve Mac, Moto Blanco, and more of plenty of other future singles from the CD, as well as a remix of the past hit SOS. Remixes range from an electro house feel to disco influenced, to tribal and hardhouse, to latin influenced. Also, on the original CD you get the bonus song "Cry" (track 13 though it isn't listed here on Amazon), which is also in remixed format on the bonus disc. Track list and times for disc two are:

CD2

1. umbrella (haji & emanuel mix) (6:27)
2. shut up and drive (wideboys mix) (6:36)
3. breakin dishes (soul seekerz mix) (6:04)
4. don't stop the music (wideboys mix) (6:37)
5. question existing (wideboys mix) (6:12)
6. hate that I love you (k-klassic mix) (7:41)
7. push up on me (moto blanco mix) (6:37)
8. good girl gone bad (soul seekerz mix) (6:35)
9. haunted (steve mac mix) (6:25)
10. say it (soul seekerz mix) (5:48)
11. cry (steve mac mix) (7:23)
12. SOS (digital dog mix) (6:22)
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars CD companies suck, June 29, 2008
The real fans purchase the albums in the first few weeks of their release & 6 months down the track the casual fans get expanded (better) editions. The record companies are trying to get money out of the fans twice for just a little bit of extra content. Every one feels sorry for the record companies with all this illegal downloading going on at the moment. Why should we feel sorry for them when they are ripping off the real fans. Someone mentioned that we should purchase the 3 extra tracks on mp3. RUBBISH. It would be only fair that these extra tracks should be available free for download even if it meant somehow proving that you purchased the inferior release. I'm sure 6 months down the track there will be an expanded version of Usher's new CD like there were for his last 2 CDs. Chris Brown, Fergie etc are all releasing expanded versions. It wouldn't bother me if the record companies released both an expanded & standard version at the same time, but they don't. Anyway this CD is really good. Love the Maroon 5 duet.
To the CD companies. A big fat GET STUFT!
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three and a half stars for the beautiful Rihanna!, June 8, 2007
This review is from: Good Girl Gone Bad (Audio CD)
Upon picking up Good Girl Gone Bad, the third and most recent album by the excruciatingly beautiful 19-year-old Barbados dancehall reggae singer Rihanna (born: Robyn Rihanna Fenty), I slightly cringed at the album's title, thinking she had gone the route of most pop diva starlets (i.e. Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, Lindsay Lohan, Jessica Simpson, etc.) by thinking that growing older means one has to flaunt and exploit sex and sexuality in order to showcase how much older she's become. When's it gonna sink in, ladies? Growing older and more mature does not mean you have to talk dirty and dress in skimpier outfits. Luckily, although there are a few songs on this album that have many sexual innuendo, upon listening to the title track, "Good Girl Gone Bad," the last track on the album, I'm relieved to hear that the title doesn't mean what most audiences would think it to mean. And that's the exact theme that Rihanna uses throughout Good Girl Gone Bad. Not only is this green-eyed Bajan one of the most beautiful women I've ever seen (she should be People Magazine's top most beautiful person), but she's also shown with each album release that she's growing not only in age but artistically as well.

Anyone who's listened to contemporary pop/rock/R&B radio knows Rihanna from her earlier hit singles "Pon De Replay," "S.O.S.," "Unfaithful," and "Break it Off." Her first album, 2005's Music of the Sun was chock full of summer dance anthems, headlined by the reggae dance tune (in the tradition of Sean Paul or Daddy Yankee, both of whom I despise) "Pon De Replay" (which I surprisingly enjoyed) that would most likely be played in any teenage girl's radio with her convertible top down and on the way to either the mall or the beach. Last year's A Girl Like Me wowed many critics who passed off Rihanna as merely another pop teen sensation. The album blended the summer dance jams that most of her fans enjoy with ballads such as "Unfaithful," penned by Ne-Yo.

The first song and also the first single, "Umbrella," features Def Jam president and rapper extraordinaire Jay-Z in an intro that only lasts a little over thirty seconds, thusly not really deserving his "featuring" title in the credits (but he still gets this title because he's the president of the company and/or he's a big name in the music business). Supposedly, Mary J. Blige turned down the chance to record this song, and, after hearing Rihanna's version, I'm sure she's kicking herself for that. After Jay-Z's intro, drum beats bring on Rihanna's voice, which doesn't go as far as it could go in this song. But that's a good thing. I have the feeling that if she had tried to project her voice as high and as loud as she could, the song would've come off as some Mariah Carey-wannabe knockoff. This song is her best single to date and it's one of the best pop songs on the radio right now! Unfortunately, we're brought next to a song that starts to touch into that overtly sexual territory that I was talking about earlier. "Push Up On Me" is exactly how it sounds: a song littered with 80's beats and sexual suggestive lyrics that are a mere excuse to make a dance song so that girls can grind into guys' groins. The one good thing about this song is it automatically transitions into the - one I'm guessing will be - the next club hit, "Don't Stop the Music." With its techno beats and a sample of Michael Jackson's "Wanna Be Startin' Something," "Don't Stop the Music," reminds me of the club beats I used to dance to back in the day. And I can already picture many remixes of this song on those Ultra Dance compilation albums (maybe volume 10?). Its infectious beats make me want to just move and dance; a good, catchy song.

Track four is "Breakin' Dishes," which I wasn't too impressed with (although it is catchy). Starting with gratuitous unifying girl-shouting chorus, the song just seems like some girl singing about her bravado in wanting to try and show how tough she is by saying she's not going home until the police show up and that she's gonna fight a man. Plus, the lyrics don't make much sense. I enjoyed the following track, "Shut Up and Drive," so much more. The song begins with a sample of New Order's "Blue Monday" guitar riffs before going into synthesizer beats and notes. The song has enough driving-and-sex metaphor to make even the most hardcore nasty rapper blush! But Rihanna sings it in her usual come-hither voice, automatically making a dance hit. The next track is a duet with her "Unfaithful" writer Ne-Yo, called "Hate That I Love You." It's a song starting off with acoustic soul guitar where each of the singers are addressing each other about the playfully annoying ways that they get on each other's nerves but recognize that that's exactly why they care so much for each other. The song is decent in a laid-back R&B acoustic soul way, but singers like Ne-Yo start to get all my nerves. I mean, take my generation's new jack soul R&B singers, who sound just like Ne-Yo: Tevin Campbell, Brian McKnight, R. Kelly, and Babyface. Look where those guys are now, Ne-Yo. `Cause you'll soon be joining their ranks in obscurity.

"Say It" is a mediocre song about a young woman's pleading to the man she loves to open up to her by talking more about his feelings and thoughts. The music stands out with an oriental-sounding influence (which is Mad Cobra's "Flex"), and with the multiple vocals (all supplied by Rihanna), sounding like En Vogue or Destiny's Child. The lyrics are so idealistic (almost to the point of naÔve) that it's easy to recognize that Rihanna didn't write these lyrics; they were written by older men who have this conception of how young women her age feel. It should be noted that unlike her first two albums, Rihanna didn't do any songwriting on this album. "Sell Me Candy" again peeks into that naÔve, sexual innuendo territory with Rihanna trying to convince this man she likes to drop his current girlfriend and hook up with her by singing sexually suggestive lyrics with candy references. Luckily, this song only runs a little over two-and-a-half minutes, and it goes into the extremely catchy "Lemme Get That." This song returns Rihanna to her dancehall reggae roots and it's a welcomed reception with the perfectly positioned use of horns. The lyrics speak of a woman who's using her sexuality to get the material possessions she wants. Ironically, near the end of the song, she sings "I'm not a gold digger." Well, actually, if you are using your body and sexuality to get material things and/or money, then you are. The song is catchy and good to dance to, but, sadly, I can see most young women embracing this song and "Sell Me Candy" as their anthems, blaring them in their cars as they sing along to the lyrics at the top of their voices.

From the dance-crazed oblivion of "Lemme Get That" to the next song, "Rehab," written by Justin Timberlake (who also supplies a few barely-noticeable background vocals), the album makes a sharp turn into more serious, profound subject matter. This song is about a girl realizing how wrong she was to devote her life and love to the guy she's dumping. She loved this man so much he was like a drug to her and the song is her getting over him, hence the title. This song is a slightly slower song and this is the song most women should be embracing. There are too many women today (particularly, young women) who date or go out with the biggest jerks who deep down are selfish and only want them for their own purposes. And the fact that this song both identifies that, but also delivers up proof that these women aren't alone and that they can get over these guys, is why this song is so much more important.

Next is "Question Existing," featuring a slow, sweeping beat and Rihanna's voice slightly digitally altered as if she's speaking in some dream. I admire her honesty and insight into her personal life and feelings. Even though she didn't receive any songwriting credit, I'm sure the singer gave some input to the writers for this song; especially with lines like: "I'm just like you/Do the mistakes I make make me a fool/Or a human with flaws/Admit that I'm lost/Round of applause/Take the abuse/Sometimes it feels like they want me to lose" and "Dear diary, it's Robyn/Entertaining is something I do for a living/It's not who I am/I like to think that I'm normal/I laugh/I get mad/I hurt/I think guys suck sometimes/I don't know who to trust/I don't know who wants to date me for who I am/Or who wants to be my friend for who I really am." Again, this isn't so much a song as it's a journal entry, with Rihanna unabashedly speaking her thoughts and feelings, and, in the process, showing other young women that they're not alone in their insecurities and doubts. After "Question," we come to the title track "Good Girl Gone Bad," which isn't about Rihanna transforming her image. No. It's an acoustic guitar-filled warning for all boys/guys/men out there that they should start being more respectful and gentlemen-like to girls/women. `Cause if they don't, as Rihanna warns, "once a good girl goes bad, we gone forever." In her own way, she's saying that not all girls are the superficial, gold-digging sluts that most likely once hurt them. I like this song and even though it's not the strongest song on the album (that goes to "Umbrella" and "Don't Stop the Music"), it's still enjoyable and a suitable finish.

If I had to rate this album from one to five stars, I'd give it a three-and-a-half. Rihanna is growing with each album release as each one showcases her ever-growing maturity; I can't wait to see what she's releasing in the next two to five years `cause I think her music will not only master the dance club genre but delve deep into the ballad territory. Even the unlikeable or questionable songs are catchy. Just like any teenager, she's got more to learn, but, unlike most teens, she knows it. And as long as she keeps out of the craziness of "celebrity" (i.e. marrying young to some deadbeat dancer, shaving her head, getting addicted to drugs/alcohol, partying all the time, making a sex tape only to have it leaked on the Internet, etc.), she'll do great with her voice and the songs that come her way. It seems like she's putting music out there that best personifies what she's currently going through in her life. As a musician and music lover, what more could you ask for? While Good Girl Gone Bad is not for everyone, it still doesn't keep it from being some catchy music and great to dance to.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hit after hit, December 19, 2008
I rate this 5 stars because Rihanna has produced several hit songs off of this one CD. Upbeat and clubby to smooth and relaxing Rihanna has a CD worthy of buying the full music CD and not just an MP3 download!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Catchy and successful, if shrill at times, October 5, 2008
This review is from: Good Girl Gone Bad: Reloaded (Audio CD)
Pop superstar Rihanna's third album, Good Girl Gone Bad, was without a doubt her biggest CD yet. And the re-release of it, with three extra tracks, has been even more successful. Of course, there is no mystery as to why. The answer can be summed up in one word: "Disturbia". This jumpy tune, and its catchy synth beat, are taking the nation by storm at the moment--but the rest of the album (including the songs from last year) cannot be overlooked in "Disturbia"'s wake.

Overall this is a very solid pop/R&B album, with a mix of energetic dance tracks and wispy slow jams, and of course "Umbrella" which falls somewhere in between. "Question Existing" was one of her more emotional and interesting cuts, but it hasn't been released as a single yet, so not as many people can appreciate it. "Rehab" and the title track are the best ballads on the CD, along with "Take A Bow", which shot up to #1 on the charts early this past summer.

Rihanna herself has a very high voice which is capable of a decent belt, even if it may be a bit whiny. What is important is that it is identifiable and stands out. She collaborates here with Jay-Z, Ne-Yo, and Maroon 5 and has two tracks produced by the legendary Timbaland. These songs are standouts, and considering that she's only 20, it's an impressive lineup to be working with.

The album is far from perfect, mind you. There are a couple tracks ("Say It" and "Push Up On Me") that get pretty annoying and repetitive quickly and unfortunately they do bring the rest down a bit. There is also an excess of ballads all together, which becomes sluggish and boring even though the songs are good on their own.

Now that Rihanna is truly a superstar thanks to getting a new image and releasing this, her biggest album yet, here's hoping that she'll continue with the success, and hopefully learn to shed some of the more irritating aspects along the way.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Bad' is the new 'good', June 5, 2007
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This review is from: Good Girl Gone Bad (Audio CD)
Just twenty-two months since releasing her debut album, 19-year-old Rihanna is already on her way to superstardom, not to mention she has two #1 hits under her belt. Since embarking on her quest to top the charts worldwide, Rihanna has continued to defy original predictions that the "Pon de Replay" star would remain a one-hit-wonder.

On her third album, `Good Girl Gone Bad,' Rihanna offers the strongest track listing to date, full of club hits like "Don't Stop the Music" and "Breakin' Dishes." Even though her vocals arguably have not improved since her `Music of the Sun' days, the production more than makes up for this factor. The greatest example of this is her #1 single "Umbrella," which has already become one of the songs of Summer 2007.

Even though the majority of Rihanna's new material is up-tempo, her duet with Ne-Yo, "Hate That I Love You," is a refreshing change of pace and doesn't slow down the momentum of the album. Although it does sound like a cookie-cutter Ne-Yo track, it still helps balance out the speed-driven "Shut Up and Drive" tracks.

Although overall a major improvement from `Sun' and `A Girl Like Me,' `Bad' has its share of weak album tracks, including "Say It" and "Question Existing." Neither of these tracks should have left the studio on the album. "Rehab," on the other hand, is actually catchy (and could fit a lot of today's stars' lives like a glove), and the mid-tempo "Good Girl Gone Bad" is a great way to end the album in Nelly Furtado fashion.

No matter how hard Rihanna tries to convince the world that she has gone bad, nothing will change the fact that this album is surprisingly good.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Weak, even for a re-release., July 10, 2008
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By now I hope everybody has figured out that re-releases usually don't benefit anyone except the greedy people at the record label headquarters. It gets them more money, and may even boost the album to the next RIAA certification. It also allows their artist to remain relevant for a little while longer, I guess. It's no secret. But still... couldn't Def Jam make it a little less obvious with this "Reloaded" edition of Rihanna's third album? The CD and DVD are housed in the same type of foldout digipak that the original came in and the artwork has been left virtually unchanged, which I think is extremely lazy. The album was already very good, and hands-down the best of Rihanna's career. The three new songs slapped on the end of the tracklist really don't add all that much. "Take A Bow" is just alright. It was mildly entertaining and catchy the first time I heard it, but by now it's overplayed--and I don't even listen to the radio much--and the Ne-Yo and Stargate collaborations are getting very tired and formulaic. "If I Never See Your Face Again" was originally just a Maroon 5 song, but apparently Rihanna was invited to join in for this "duet." Rihanna should not try to do rock. It just doesn't work, and her vocals and Adam's just do not go together. It's as simple as that. "Disturbia," which will be the set's seventh single, is by far the best. It follows the new trend of Euro-pop inspired tunes and it's pretty catchy and even a little bit creative. It's co-written by and features background vocals from her supposed boyfriend, Chris Brown. The DVD is lame, simply put, and its only purpose is to get us to buy the Good Girl Gone Bad Live DVD that's going to be coming out later this summer. It's nice to see what Rihanna is like as a person in the documentary bits, but the performances are extremely subpar and not very entertaining. In conclusion, this is weak, even for a re-release. Rather than releasing rip-off discs, Rihanna should just go back in the studio to record a whole new album of fresh material. Good Girl Gone Bad has has seven--yes, seven--singles and counting! Talk about overexposure. And the album has only gone platinum... inexcusable, even in today's harsh industry. Even though the album is great, it's time to put it to rest and move on to a new era. Do not buy this unless you are a die-hard fan or completist.
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Good Girl Gone Bad: Reloaded
Good Girl Gone Bad: Reloaded by Rihanna (Audio CD - 2008)
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