Customer Reviews


36 Reviews
5 star:
 (26)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book every woman should read!
As a writer for Plugged In Parents website, I can say with complete honesty that this book is a MUST read for all women (of any age). Before I start my review, I need to be upfront with you. This book really hit home, and I cried several times while reading it, because I've been struggling with an eating disorder for the past five years.

While pregnant with my...
Published on November 17, 2010 by J. Vanleer

versus
8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing at Best
Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It by Robyn Silverman and Dina Santorelli is bound to be one of those books that to be a clarion call to action. How can we protect our girls from the barrage of body image advice that often slips into a form of verbal abuse in its inescapable and endless shout...
Published on January 21, 2011 by Satia Renee


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book every woman should read!, November 17, 2010
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
As a writer for Plugged In Parents website, I can say with complete honesty that this book is a MUST read for all women (of any age). Before I start my review, I need to be upfront with you. This book really hit home, and I cried several times while reading it, because I've been struggling with an eating disorder for the past five years.

While pregnant with my first son, I gained 50 pounds. I ate and ate and ate, having no idea the weight wouldn't magically come off after I had my son. Now, I'm not a petite person at all. I'm 5'8" and I've always been a size medium. There was no reason for me to gain 50 pounds. So when my son was 8 months old and I was struggling to lose the last 10 pounds, I started something I never thought I would do. After overeating, I would make myself purge (throw up).

Just typing that brings me to tears. Feeling completely out of control of your own body is an awful place to be.

The thing is, I looked great. I had a bit of a baby belly, but good grief, I had just given birth 8 months before! I was just too self-conscious that I freaked out. I needed to see that pre-baby weight number on the scale.

Fast forward a few years and I have yet to see that number on the scale. I still struggle with overeating and, every once in awhile, purging. I'm ashamed of this, and I'm working on getting past it. I'm trying to see myself as a beautiful woman, no matter what size I am. I know we're not all made the same, and I will never be a size 2, nor do I want to be. I want to find the beauty in ME, not base my beauty on a number or a size.

Why is there so much pressure for girls to look a certain way in our society today? We should be embracing inner beauty and encouraging girls to be who they are meant to be, not who our world thinks they should be.

Robyn does just that in Good Girls Don't Get Fat. She shares examples of conversations she's had with teenage girls and young women -- all of them eye-opening and frightening. Apparently women aren't just dealing with anorexia and bulimia anymore. Girls are taking steroids, beating their stomachs, and taking laxatives to get thin.

Robyn also discusses the importance of parents not putting pressure on their daughters to look a certain way. She includes a guide on how to be the best dad and mom you can be for your daughter, and lists actual examples on what you can say and do. Robyn shows us how one word or sentence can haunt a girl for the rest of her life, and the parents may not have even meant to be critical. I think the same goes for friends and other family members as well. We need to encourage our daughters, mothers and female friends. Let them know how beautiful they are, not how skinny they are.

There are multiple charts, quizzes and other helpful things in Good Girls Don't Get Fat. It's a great guide for parents who don't know what to look for, what to ask, or where to start. One thing that surprised me was that an older brother can 'teach' a younger sister how boys would like her to look, indirectly. A younger sister will learn how guys want her to look just by watching how her older brother treats other girls.

One of my favorite chapters is "Kiss My Assets: The Secret of Girls Who Thrive at Every Size." This chapter is so inspiring and helps girls realize they can be happy with their body, no matter their size.

The bottom line is: we need to stop judging ourselves and others by their size. It really doesn't get us anywhere. And please, if you are struggling with an eating disorder, or know someone who is, get help! Speak up about it. I held it in for too long, and now I can't believe I've been struggling with this for 5 years. I don't want this to rule the rest of my life, and Robyn's book gave me the tools to start moving forward.

It's hard and embarrassing to talk about, but it's so important to talk about. There are millions of women and girls out there, suffering from warped body images and eating disorders, who are too scared to say anything. Speak up! We are beautiful women, period! Don't let anyone tell you differently!

I can't recommend this book enough. It has helped me tremendously, and I'm positive it can help many others as well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Dad's Point of View on "Good Girls Don't Get Fat", December 22, 2010
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
I think the title of Dr. Robyn Silverman's book (Good Girls Don't Get Fat) really says it all. We've trained our girls to think they are bad or less of a person if they are fat. Whether it's through magazines, television, the internet or ironically, the people who are supposed to love these girls the most (parents, siblings, "friends," and teachers - yes teachers!!), girls are beginning to worry about their weight at younger and younger ages. While talk radio programs air news stories weekly extolling the dangers of obesity (which is, of course, also an important health issue), Dr. Silverman sees countless girls in her practice with only minor weight problems or none at all. However, these girls have convinced themselves they are fat and therefore "bad."

The book provides excellent information of how aspects of a young girl's life can send her the message of to be thin is to be happy, healthy, loved. The author takes the discussion from the "inside out" starting with what a girl thinks about her weight in her own head and continuing to cover how the various relationships in her life can exacerbate the issues. Including how powerful words can be in these various relationships (mother, father, step-parents if applicable, other family members, teachers and other adults).

Dr. Silverman uses a lot of tools, tips and worksheets throughout the book and are an excellent supplement to the information. Readers get examples of weight issues that may arise with girls and can read "Say What" boxes to give guidance on "what not to say" and "what to say" -- (dads take note of that please). "Overheard" boxes appear throughout the chapters as well which share stories and quotes from girls she interviewed. A tip list appears at the end of every chapter and are specific as to the information in the chapter. For example, the chapter for dads ends with tips for dads on how to nurture the relationship with their daughter so it has a positive impact on her self-worth.

Of course, I was particularly interested in the chapter about dads titled, "Father Figure: Daddy's Not-So-Little Girl." Dads play a huge role in whether their daughters have a positive or negative self-image. This chapter was eye-opening, especially in regards to some of the "Overheard" sections. I cringed when I read some of the horribly insensitive things some dads would say to their daughters, thinking they're being funny or a joker. I would like to think most dads would want to take back those words or avoid saying them altogether, especially knowing the price those jokes can have on a girl's self-image. Like I mentioned above, the chapter ends with some really useful tips and things to remember. The chapter also ended with a BIQ (The Body Image Quotient), a quiz to gauge how your daughter is doing in a world so focused on thinness at all costs. These appear in many of the chapters and in Chapter 8 you get to tabulate your daughter's score. Very interesting and a really good way to assess how things are going.

In the book's introduction, Dr. Silverman concludes with this: "I hope and pray that one day, when my daughter stares into the mirror and asks, "Am I acceptable the way I am?" she will confidently say yes. But I know that the real triumph will come when girls of all sizes and every age don't even have to ask. They'll just know." Reading that early on in the book got me thinking about what a great gift that would be and how crucial my role as a father plays into that happening. As a father to a 20-month-old girl, this just may be the most important book I've read since becoming a parent. Do something special for the girls in your life and read this book.

Reviewed on Book Dads: [...]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Girl's Don't Get Fat..., October 28, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
As a high school teacher, a body image and eating disorders professional development educator for teachers and admin of all grade levels, Club Advisor (Body Rocks) which promotes positive Body Image and Self Esteem in our school and community AND a mother of a 6 year old little girl, THIS BOOK IS A MUST HAVE!

I received my book on a Friday afternoon and could not take my eyes off it. I finally fell asleep about 3 am. Why? This book covers EVERY aspect of the issues our girls (and boys) face today in the society that is filled with beauty and media. It has become the talk of my family, my kids at school, and now my administration. What I like most about this book is that a parent, teen, teacher, anyone...you can understand what Dr. Silverman is saying. We can all relate to this book. What I found MOST interesting was how a mother can enhance her child's body image OR destroy it. If you have already destroyed it, there are ways Dr. Silverman helps you understand how to make the needed changes so your daughter can live a healthy body image. I have been saying this to parents for years! HERE IT IS!

I have dealt with several kids, all ages, colors, etc. that have been pressured by the media to feel good about themselves through fashion and beauty. Ive seen kids cry because their mother, father, teacher, coach, sibling has called them FAT. These words scar our kids. It is time we educate ourselves and look at the reality of society TODAY! Whatever happened to looking in the mirror (Dr. Robyn also wrote in depth about this) and seeing that amazing person for who you are rather then this amazing person IF you have the right brand of make up or clothes.

I have taken the tools that Dr. Robyn has provided with enthusiasm and excitement to share with others. As a teacher, we are the first to notice body image issues. As a parent, we are the first to damage their body issues. This book has been recomended to EVERY person I know.

Let me explain, I have bookshelves of body image books, many are very helpful. Many have reliable resources. However, many are very hard for one to understand and relate to if they do not know that much about our society and "FAT". This is why this book could not be put down. I have been passing it around. My 13 year old niece just finished it, and I now have passed it on to my 18 year old student. Good Girls are still "good girls" even if they look different. It is up to us as parents, educators, friends, etc. to educate ourselves on the dangers of poor body image, dieting, environment if we don't watch how we express our feelings.

Most importantly, this book has numerous resources, research, and contacts of those who also specialize with this issue. Reliable resources are extremely difficult to find when it comes to body image. Dr. Robyn has a lot to offer the future of our children and I am excited for the next book! INSPIRATIONAL book that should be on every book shelf!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A decent HAES introduction for concerned parents..., October 1, 2010
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
Good Girls Don't Get Fat / 978-0-373-89220-4

I was pleased to receive this book from NetGalley for review; I'm a strong believer in HAES (Health At Every Size), and this book is exactly the sort of valuable study that can benefit parents hoping to raise happy, healthy daughters who are not constantly encumbered by the "skinny or else!" messages that bombard them constantly.

Broken into nine chapters, "Good Girls Don't Get Fat" explores the potentially near-constant sources of criticism and denigration that can occur in childhood and can extend detrimentally into a lifetime of eating disorders, self-abuse, and poor self-esteem. Chapter 1 covers self-criticism and the importance of banishing negative internal thoughts and the constant visceral awareness of weight at all times. Chapter 2 covers the impact that mothers have on their daughters, and carefully explains the difference between teaching your child to value good health and just popping off with criticism thoughtlessly (for instance, spontaneously popping off with "Are you going to eat all that?", teaches less good eating habits and more that eating in public will invite judgment and criticism from others). Chapter 3 explores the sometimes-hidden effect of fathers on their daughters: how to be active in raising healthy, happy women, and how not to inadvertently encourage your daughter to remain a child. Chapter 4 covers the impact of the family at large, and how brothers and sisters play an important role in either creating or preventing unhealthy attitudes towards eating.

Expanding from the family sphere, chapters 5 and 6 cover the influences of school - first of the adult officials (in a chapter that will leave most readers outraged at the sheer gall of some people - including a teacher who apparently thought it was a good idea to mention a student's weight in her letter of recommendation for college admission), and then of the children (friends and enemies alike) who play a role in a person's childhood development. From there, the book delves into positive alternatives to all these potentially detrimental sources - how to love your body and teach your children to love theirs; how to overcome inevitable negative outside sources; and how to monitor and improve your internal body image over time.

"Good Girls Don't Get Fat" is a perfect example of a `scholarly' style of work that has a great deal of knowledge and information to impart, yet the writing style is so engaging and flows so well that it reads like a book for pleasure rather than a book for learning. As author Silverman interviews hundreds of young women about their life experiences, the reader flows smoothly over the positive highs (the father who took the time to reaffirm that his daughter looked lovely in the size 12 she'd excessively and dangerously dieted for, but she would have looked equally lovely in the size 14 that she had feared so much) and the negative lows (the teacher who feels that she has no responsibility to her students to help them if they are bullied by other teachers for their weight), and all the learning experiences along the way. The message of this book, too, is a very good one - Silverman repeatedly reminds parents (the intended audience) that their words and actions matter and that it does no good to affirm your children with positive self-image if your own words and actions underscore your own negative one. She also correctly hammers home the importance of not falling into "obesity panic" - she encourages setting and modeling healthy eating habits, but also recognizes the importance of letting young adults start to choose some of their own eating habits (they're going to have to learn sometime, after all!) without the fear of constant and immediate criticism from their loved ones.

If I have to level one criticism at this book, it would be that in spite of all this wonderful HAES doctrine, Silverman sometimes can't quite follow it all the way. Although she does point out at least once that skinny does not equal healthy, she does try to have her cake and eat it too with passages that encourage parents to "be more active" with their kids if they are worried about the child's weight. Since neither I nor Silverman think children are stupid, however, I'm surprised that she doesn't seem to realize that a parent suddenly putting their child on an obvious exercise program isn't likely to instill negative body feelings any less than the same parent suddenly putting their child on a food diet. And while I have nothing against parent-child physical activities, prescribing them as a "solution" to weight rather than as a good in itself is very much against HAES philosophy; and draping everything in a platonic "for their health" statement doesn't absolve matters when the only indication of "bad health" on the child's part is that they weigh more than the parent thinks they should. In all other areas of the book, Silverman recognizes and forcefully acknowledges that parents often have unrealistic weight goals for their children, so it just seems strange to see all that fall down in later chapters with all the "for their health" talk. Another criticism, perhaps, is the "determine your daughter's body image" quizzes at the end of every chapter - again, Silverman recognizes that many eating disorder sites encourage girls to say the "right" things to prevent family suspicion, so grading a daughter based on the things she says and does when her parents are looking may give the evaluator a false sense of security that everything is fine when it isn't.

For its minor faults, however, "Good Girls Don't Get Fat" is a wonderful read and a source of valuable and insightful information, particularly for HAES followers who worry about raising a child in our culture, and who worry about slipping into old self-hating habits in a subconscious modeling of the way we ourselves we raised. I enjoyed this book immensely, and plan to reread it again to ensure that the behaviors I am modeling are safe and healthy for the children around me.

NOTE: This review is based on a free Advance Review Copy of this book provided through NetGalley.

~ Ana Mardoll
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a must read, November 10, 2013
By 
Jim Cooper (plainsboro, nj United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
If you look in the mirror and hear negative voices, this book is for you. If you look at your kids and all you notice is their physical state, this book is for you. If you are a husband, wife, father, mother, sister, brother, aunt, uncle or TEACHER, this book is for you.

GGDGF challenges our society's obsession with appearance to look at the impacts on, primarily, teenage girls, both past and present, in the form of eating disorders, low self esteem and as the targets of constant unpardonable marketing. Some of the voices you will hear in this book are heartbreaking, but they are voices that need to be heard
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Something I want to get "right", April 5, 2013
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
It's fairly clear (and well-advertised by the media) that American women have a "weight problem". The author has a set of "good girl weight rules" that resonate. I've spent years trying to deny those rules, yet they are so ubiquitous that you can't help imagine what impact they have on the younger generation.

I would love not to carry on the weight obsession to my daughters. It's tough. And reading one book won't fix it. (Unfortunately.) But, I found this book very engaging, very readable.

It is very important that my daughters not grow up believing their self-worth (or anyone's self-worth) is tied to their body shape. Some of it is genetics (which they cannot change), and otherwise we try to stay active and healthy. In my quest to get others to understand, I've had to refer them to this book. I'm under no illusion it's going to make a perfect world, but hopefully it will raise awareness to the messages we send to young girls.

Highly recommend this book to pretty much everyone. Parents, grandparents, teachers, coaches, advertisers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Really Helpful, September 29, 2011
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
As others have given very thorough overviews of the books content I won't go over that again here. I am not a parent, but I am someone with first hand experience with eating, self image, and projection issues. As someone with these issues for many years, this book really hit home for me. It deals with all these issues and more- and discusses how to prevent them in young girls. He offers methods for starting conversations in a delicate manor and how to keep conversations going that might ordinarily grind to a halt with statements like "I'm so fat/ugly/stupid (you fill in the adj)".

The only problem I have with the book is the title- having this book sitting around with this title looks a little weird- and if someone does not understand the underlying scarcasm (or is too young to understand and thinks that their parent BELIEVES that statement) it could be a bit of a problem.

Overall, I would highly recommend this book to anyone who has weight, self-confidence, or food issues as it has been one of the most helpful books I have ever read on the subject and one of the few that actually make you feel better about your self after you finish it than you did before you started.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Girls Don't Get Fat - A great read for families of girls!, August 1, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
In pursuit of advice I read Good Girls don't Get Fat by Dr. Robyn Silverman. I have followed her a while on Twitter and Facebook and really like what I learn from her. She is also an adoptive mom of two small kiddos. The book is an excellent read for parents of girls and teachers. It reviews everyday parenting at the dinner table and touches on the subject of bullying in the classroom.

The book is packed with studies, examples and great advice. Just a few things I took away from the book that make me glad I read it:

1) When moms say things,girls remember. Even a poorly worded complement (you look like you lost weight) can effect how a girl feels about weight. We are all going to say things wrong sometimes without meaning to, but I think I need to pay attention to every word I say about weight and health. I need to make sure that I regularly give praise to the girls about how lovely they are to off-balance the stupid things that sometimes come out.

2) Listen to what the girls are saying and answer with what they need. Saying "don't be silly everyone looks different" to a girl when she says "My body looks funny" is not helpful. We need to say. Your body is amazing. Your healthy and active and your body will take you to amazing places!

3)What dad's say and do matter. The cute nick-names of the toddler days like chubby cheeks should be put to rest. Girls are watching and listening to what dad says. So dads should watch what they say just as much as moms. If your daughter hears negative comments about plus-size women she is going to process it and possibly take it to heart if she feels she is plus-size as well.

4. Learn how your girls think and what motivates them. Trash talking does not work as a motivator for most girls. Girl internalize things, so while telling a boy he runs like a grandma would push him to run faster, a girl may just stop running.

Of course the advice above that I gleaned from Dr. Robyn's book can be put to topics other than weight.

After finishing the book I decided not to talk about the serving size thing directly with my girls. I'm just going to dish out the proper serving sizes and be casual about it. I'm going to go with uplifting words, good examples and a lot of prayer.

My only real concern about the book was the title. I was afraid the girls would read it and take it literally. I told them that the title was an eye-catching way to get people to pick up the book, and that the book was about making sure girls of all body types feel good about themselves. I still was tempted to rip off the cover though!

My total review is on my blog at [...]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exit out of the weight obsession maze, July 12, 2011
By 
Deb (Palo Alto, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
If you're a parent, teacher, or a relative of an adolescent girl, you'll likely find this book to be an incredibly valuable resource for breaking out of the weight-obsession maze that traps so many young women today. Packed with up-to-date information, real-life stories, and well-organized tips and suggestions, this book offers a clear approach for helping young women thrive.

We're all too aware of the toxic messages young women are bombarded with on a daily basis. But just how do we protect them, and help them realize that happiness is not defined by a number on the scale or a size on a pair of jeans? Robyn's book can help you start the necessary dialogue to address these issues: It'll help you learn what to say, what not to say, and how to say it. And, more importantly, it will help you determine what you can do to walk the talk. (Warning: reading this book may very well awaken you to many of the societal messages that you too have bought into!)

A look at the Table of Contents shows the comprehensiveness of the topics covered and audiences addressed (as well as a taste of the author's sense-of-humor which helps all the information go down):
Introduction--Skinny or Else!
Chapter 1--The Body Bully Within: Her Own Worst Enemy
Chapter 2--The Secret Impact of Mothers: I Love My Mom, But...
Chapter 3--Father Figure: Daddy's Not-So-Little Girl
Chapter 4--Hitting Home: The Butt of Family Jokes
Chapter 5--The School Fool, Part I: Teachers
Chapter 6--The School Fool, Part II: Friends
Chapter 7--Kiss My Assets: The Secrets of Girls Who Thrive at Every Size
Chapter 8--Your Daughter's BIQ (Body Image Quotient): What's Her Total?
Chapter 9--Goodbye, Good Girl. Hello Asset Girl!

What's most impressive about this book is its positive tone, and the ongoing message that young women--of any body size--can thrive. In particular, the "Assets that Protect and Promote Positive Behaviors" (pp. 175-207) serve as The "10 Commandments" for developing healthy attitudes in young women:
1. I know how I feel, and I can express my emotions in a healthy, productive way.
2. I take healthy risks, and I am accountable for my actions.
3. I set and go after goals to create the future I want.
4. I see my body and myself in a positive light, and I speak to myself accordingly.
5. I surround myself with and am surrounded by positive, encouraging supportive people who serve as role models and peers who share my values.
6. I am aware and critical of the messages I receive about thinness and keep a healthy perspective on how I fit within those parameters.
7. I use my time constructively and participate in activities that contribute to my mental and physical well-being and/or the well-being of others.
8. I believe in my own power to affect my world and take action on something that is important.
9. I believe in my competencies and self-worth, and refuse to allow negative feedback to derail me.
10. I allow my positive values to guide my thoughts and behavior, rather than doing what's popular or easy.

If there was a required reading list for raising healthy, body-positive young women, this book would no-doubt top that list.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye Opener for parents, teachers, April 27, 2011
This review is from: Good Girls Don't Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls and How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
We want to teach our daughters to love their bodies and have healthy eating habits - yet when we adults stuff our shelves with diet books and yearn out loud to lose weight before that vacation or party, what are they really learning? This book is an easy-to-read, straightforward guide to helping girls of all shapes and sizes avoid the constant media barrage of the-thinner-the-better. There are chapters for moms, dads, and teachers (two chapters devoted to the school environment) with lots of interviews with girls, who talk about how a thousand little cuts - moms who cook rich desserts but never eat them, dads who avoid girl talk, "frenemies" who make cutting remarks - add up to the message that looks are all that matter. The last chapter is about building "assets" such as owning your emotions, setting (non-weight-related) goals, helping others and basically believing in yourself. The back has lots of helpful websites and books listed. If you have daughters, this is a very good book to have.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.