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The Good News We Almost Forgot: Rediscovering the Gospel in a 16th Century Catechism Paperback – March 17, 2010


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The Good News We Almost Forgot: Rediscovering the Gospel in a 16th Century Catechism + Crazy Busy: A (Mercifully) Short Book about a (Really) Big Problem + Taking God At His Word: Why the Bible Is Knowable, Necessary, and Enough, and What That Means for You and Me
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Moody Publishers; New Edition edition (March 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802458408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802458407
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #91,315 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

KEVIN DEYOUNG is the Senior Pastor at University Reformed Church in East Lansing, Michigan, located near Michigan State University. He serves as a council member at The Gospel Coalition and blogs on TGC's DeYoung, Restless and Reformed. He is the co-author of Why We're Not Emergent: By Two Guys Who Should Be, Why We Love the Church: In Praise of Institutions and Organized Religion, and What is the Mission of the Church? Making sense of social justice, Shalom and the Great Commission and the author of Just Do Something: A Liberating Approach to Finding God's Will, The Good News We Almost Forgot: Rediscovering the Gospel in a 16th Century Catechism, The Hole in Our Holiness: Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness, and Crazy Busy: A (Mercifully) Short Book about a (Really) Big Problem. Kevin and his wife, Trisha, have five children: Ian, Jacob, Elizabeth, Paul, and Mary.

More About the Author

I am the Senior Pastor at University Reformed Church (RCA) in East Lansing, Michigan, near the Michigan State University campus. I've been the pastor there since 2004. I was born in Chicagoland, but grew up mostly in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area. I root for da Bears, da Bulls, da Blackhawks, the White Sox, and the Spartans.

I am married to Trisha. We live in Lansing and have six young children.

Customer Reviews

Well written, doctrinally sound, and easy to read.
J. Mulder
I feel like C. J. Mahaney when he states in his review, "I'm sure this will be the best book on the Heidelberg Catechism I've ever read. I know it will be the first."
Ron Coia
Yet Kevin DeYoung has taken the Heidelberg Catechism and unearthed a treasure that is modern, relevant and even interesting in The Good News We Almost Forgot.
Jared Totten

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By John Gardner on May 10, 2010
Format: Paperback
Chances are pretty good that many people reading this are wondering, What in the world is a catechism? The short answer is that it is a method of teaching Biblical truth in an orderly way. The word "catechize" comes from the Greek word katecheo, which is the word Paul used several times in the New Testament translated "instruct" or "teach" (see for example, 1 Cor. 14:19, Gal. 6:6, and Acts 18:25). Typically, a catechism teaches the doctrines held by the church through a series of questions and answers, with references to supporting Scriptures.

More specifically, the Heidelberg Catechism is one of several historic church documents produced around the time of the Reformation for the purposes of instructing children (and adults) in the doctrines of the new Protestant faith. It was published in 1563, written primarily by Zacharias Ursinus, who was a professor at the University of Heidelberg. The catechism contains 129 Questions & Answers, arranged into 52 Lord's Days. The idea was that students being taught the catechism would memorize a set of Q&A's each week, reciting them in their catechism class (a predecessor of "Sunday School") on the Lord's Day.

The Heidelberg is divided into three main sections: The Misery of Man, Man's Deliverance, and Thankfulness. Or, as the sections are more commonly known, "Guilt, Grace, and Gratitude". These sections teach us systematically our need for salvation, God's work in accomplishing our salvation, and the Christian's response to salvation. The catechism also focuses largely on three elements: The Apostle's Creed, the Ten Commandments, and the Lord's Prayer.

If you've never read a book on the Heidelberg Catechism before, you're not alone. In fact, C.J.
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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Tim Challies TOP 500 REVIEWER on April 9, 2010
Format: Paperback
When I was a teenager, Tuesday nights were Catechism nights. I would go to church and, under the tutelage of the pastor, both study and memorize what I affectionately called "Ye Olde Heidelberger." The deep truths of that document provided a firm foundation for my growing faith. Even as a teen I realized that at the very heart of the Heidelberg Catechism is the gospel of Jesus Christ. And yet I cannot deny that it has been many years since I last studied it. In Good News We Almost Forget Kevin DeYoung dusts off that old Catechism and proves that it is as relevant today as it was 450 years ago. Its truths are timeless, its encouragement unchanged. I am grateful to Kevin for introducing this venerable document to a new generation of believers. May they find hope and joy in the One it celebrates.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Ron Coia VINE VOICE on May 31, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As my friend Buddy likes to say, the subtitle of a book means more than the title. That is certainly true of Kevin DeYoung's newest book, The Good News We Almost Forgot. The add-on is, "Rediscovering the Gospel in a 16th Century Catechism." See what I mean? Buddy was right.

I feel like C. J. Mahaney when he states in his review, "I'm sure this will be the best book on the Heidelberg Catechism I've ever read. I know it will be the first." Like most people, I have never read a book on this or any other catechism. I'm glad I did, though.

For those of you who have not heard of the Heidelberg Catechism, it was published in 1563 as a way to help with a systematic study of the teaching of the Bible. It takes readers through important theological concepts framed within the Lord's Prayer, the Ten Commandments, and the Apostles' Creed. Ladened with Scripture references, the Heidelberg Catechism helps Bible students to get a bird's-eye view of Reformed Christian doctrine.

As for DeYoung's book, it is organized in a similar format as the Catechism. DeYoung divides the Catechism into 52 readings, one for each Lord's Day. In addition to the original text, he provides a short, 2-3 page commentary exploring the themes and offering practical applications in an engaging, readable way. From the virgin birth to the resurrection, from the Trinity to divine providence, from the Sabbath to justice, this book offers a brief discussion on a variety of topics pivotal to the Christian life.

The one point of criticism that I have of this book is the chapter on infant baptism, and it is not because I'm a believer-baptism proponent. I am eager to find out why others believe in infant baptism, and search for lucid pieces that explain it. This was not one of them.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Nancy A. Almodovar on December 29, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For years my husband and I were in a modern evangelical church where we learned how we could take our "five stones" and knock down the "goliaths" in our lives, or march around our "jericho walls" and keep praising till they came down. We'd only heard that "catechisms" were for those "dead denominational" churches or were somehow "catholic" in a derogatory manner. Then, by God's gracious providence (you'll learn what that term is on Lord's day 10 in this book) He led us to the reformers via two ways: reading history and reading a great theological book (Old Paths by JC Ryle...someone else today's evangelicals should read pronto). We discovered the Heidelberg Catechism, the Cannons of Dordt and the Belgic Confession of Faith (Three forms of Unity as they're called). Practical and theology were were told were mutually exclusive. Not so we soon discovered. In order to know how to live our Christian life you need to know what exactly is the Christian life and that takes knowing, knowing the teachings of the Bible or what they call "doctrine" and you need to know What God has required, What God has Provided and Who it is who provided it as well as How that provision has been made and how what was required has been completely satisfied; not by you or your faith but rather by the perfect obedience of Christ the Righteous One.
I came across this book while looking for some ebooks for my new Kindle (which if you don't have, I highly recommend getting for yourself). I've decided to read a chapter a day making it more of a devotional or daily reading book...I'm glad I did. I've now been when you can call Dutch Reformed for about 3 years and the wealth in the Catechism never ceases to amaze me.
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