Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Good News From Outer Space Paperback – March 15, 1995


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, March 15, 1995
$5.35 $0.01
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Orb Books (March 15, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312890419
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312890414
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,478,361 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Kessel's ( Freedom Beach ) latest novel, a black comedy of pre-millenial hysteria set a decade in the future, is an outstandingly original work. George Eberhart, recently resuscitated from a "successful" suicide attempt by the newly perfected Han process--a scientific advance widely regarded as blasphemous--finds himself even more alienated from his trashy journalism job and his wife than he was before his "death." George becomes fascinated by a pattern of events that suggests a protean alien is traveling around the country playing sadistic games with unsuspecting earthlings, and he sets off to find the creature. While the novel is instantly enthralling and remains so for the first half, the focus then softens and the pace slackens. Writing in a intelligent, witty voice, Kessel creates full-fleshed adult characters in a somewhat uneven but still impressive achievement.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

While televangelist Jimmy-Don Gilray mobilizes the state of North Carolina to await an alien-assisted Millennium, tabloid reporter George Eberhart uncovers an awful truth--the aliens are ahead of schedule. This clever story of cosmic (and comic) catastrophe by the co-author of Freedom Beach (with James P. Kelly, LJ 12/1/85) is recommended for both sf and general fiction collections.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robert Anderson on October 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
Written a decade prior to the dawning of the new millenium this story portrays a chaotic America that is breaking apart. It combines stories of societal chaos, religious nuts, and aliens but ultimately fell flat for a variety of reasons...
First, at the very heart of a good story is a central conflict around which the plot revolves. There didn't seem to be one here, or at least it wasn't very compelling to me as a reader (It would have been compelling if I'd cared about the characters, - more on that below).
Second, the representation of religious mania was so exaggerated that it could only have been entertaining if portrayed humorously, which it wasn't. The reverend was a way-over-the-top stereotype of those preachers on TV and his followers were cardboard "followers". No light was shed on the actual motivation of those in our society prone to religious delusions. These followers more or less believed whatever they were told and did whatever their leader said. Although it may seem that religious nuts in our society are this way, those who know much about real religious nuts can tell you that it's hard to get large numbers of them to agree on anything or follow any one particular leader. So what made these ones so pliable and easy to manipulate?
Thirdly, the characters were largely unsympathetic. Except for Lucy, they all were deranged and as a reader I felt that the world would be better off without them. And the protagonist spent the entire movie chasing aliens, yet we were only provided with the flimsiest explanation of why he was so obsessed with them or why he thought they were trying to take over the planet.
And lastly, the various plotlines were barely even resolved at the end of the book.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
I first picked up my copy of this book off the shelf of some drugstore some years ago, and was utterly blown away by it. Full of weirdness, holier-than-thou mob frenzy, millienial fever, and even an alien, this Lewis Carroll-meets-Televangilism masterpiece kept me spellbound through the fourth and fifth readings. It is one of those that, while good the first time through, gets even better on subsequent reads.
I am warning you right now though, this book will be expensive for you. Why? Because you will be blown away by it, and you will make a friend read it. You will lend it to them, and never see it again. This is one of those books that will keep getting away from you until you break down and buy a copy to place in your secure book-vault.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is a great book to read if you like dark social commentary, sharp wit, and stories about doom-sayers and doom-nayers. Kessel is able to capture the chaotic nature of apocalyptic events and make the reader feel as though the he or she has been absorbed into the scene. I would highly recommend this book to any avid sci-fi reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
The other reviewers miss the point because the culture change the aliens cause is so subtle. They are changing the narratives of people's lives because they don't work anymore, they pose the wrong questions, like the resurrected journalist George Eberhart's wife Lucky who became disenchanted with her liberal support of prisoners using the law library to defend themselves when all they did was abuse the system to get free. This is a major reframing in the sense of Milton H. Erickson's Neuro-Linguistic reprogramming. The alternative title of this book ought to be "You can't get there from here," meaning they can't use logic to get out of the fix they're in. The aliens subvert the narrative and compel people to create new ones. First lesson of quantum mechanics: sometimes the best way to solve a problem is to walk away from it, abandon the whole frame of reference, the whole cultural context and all the smoking wreckage of Aristotelian logic, Marx, Hegel, Adam Smith, and Ayn Rand, his misbegotten prophetess.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images