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A Good Walk Spoiled (Lambert and Hook Mysteries) Hardcover – November 1, 2008


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Hardcover, November 1, 2008
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--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.
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New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Lambert and Hook Mysteries
  • Hardcover: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Severn House Publishers (November 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0727866664
  • ISBN-13: 978-0727866660
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,171,389 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Richard Cullis, Director of R&D at Gloucester Chemicals, is a serial womanizer with the morals of an alley cat. When he keels over at a company dinner, and the postmortem reveals that he was poisoned with the deadly drug ricin, detectives Lambert and Hook have no shortage of suspects. Nearly everyone who worked for Cullis bore a grudge against the man, and while ricin is extremely hard to come by, every scientist working in the R&D Department had access to it. Among the many suspects: the researcher Cullis raped, the scorned woman with whom he had a torrid affair, the animal-rights sympathizer who’s working undercover in the lab, the man Cullis recently fired, and the woman he passed over for promotion. This fine police procedural extends the excellent reputation Gregson has established with his highly entertaining Lambert and Hook series. --Emily Melton

Review

There is a mole in the ranks of Gloucester Chemicals, and an animal rights group threatens a top executive if the company does not release its animals. Worse, that same executive rapes one of the company's female scientists. When the man is poisoned at a company golf tournament, there are unsurprisingly a number of suspects confronting detectives Hook and Lambert. Inspector Peach series author Gregson has a style that can be likened to that of Peter Turnbull and Claire Curzon. For collections where British procedurals circulate --Library Journal, 1st November 2008

There is a mole in the ranks of Gloucester Chemicals, and an animal rights group threatens a top executive if the company does not release its animals. Worse, that same executive rapes one of the company's female scientists. When the man is poisoned at a company golf tournament, there are unsurprisingly a number of suspects confronting detectives Hook and Lambert. Inspector Peach series author Gregson has a style that can be likened to that of Peter Turnbull and Claire Curzon. For collections where British procedurals circulate --Library Journal, 1st November 2008

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Format: Hardcover
Let me start by saying that I'm confused. Amazon's description of this book says that it has 352 pages; the hard-cover copy I picked up at the library has only 216. So maybe that's the problem: I've been reading some sort of abridged version, from which a hundred pages of relevant material have been excised. Okay, not likely, especially because at the end, I was thinking that they could easily have removed thirty percent of the text I did read (I had trouble believing that police interviews contain that much rambling) without it making much difference. So - I remain confused.

Anyway. The bottom line is that there are too many things about the plot that just don't make sense. Suspects conveniently blurt out potentially incriminating comments that the police pounce on but then they don't do much with them; in fact, the denoument concerns a comment that the police _expect_ someone to make but they never do. I can't reveal much more about that without spoiling the ending, but trust me, it's such a bizarre way of looking at the situation that it has no logic - I read the relevant sentence over and over and kept coming up with "Huh?" Also, how is it that nothing whatever is said about how the poison got into the victim, i.e. through his drinking glass, his first course, etc. - not a word about analyzing the dishes he ate and drank from at the dinner where he met his end. Wouldn't that be standard police procedure? I really wonder how much the author knows about police work. There was more blather about one of the detectives' Open University course (complete with constant annoying precocious wisecracking from his school-age sons) than there was about the gathering of evidence.
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