Good Wives (Little Women Series) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Good Wives (Penguin Popular Classics) Paperback – September 1, 1995


See all 107 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, September 1, 1995
$0.01 $0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

There is a newer edition of this item:


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Introducing The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle FreeTime Unlimited
Free one month trial
Get unlimited access to thousands of kid-safe books, apps and videos, for one low price, with Amazon FreeTime Unlimited. Get started for free. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Popular Classics
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books, Limited (UK) (September 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140621903
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140621907
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 0.5 x 7.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,924,853 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Good Wives is a glorious weep-a-minute...a more complex narrative that follows each of the girls' journeys, real or metaphorical, away from the parental home Independent 'Six generations of readers have found in the story of the March family universal truths about girls, families and growing up' Guardian --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Louisa May Alcott (1832--88) was brought up in Pennsylvania, USA. She turned to writing in order to supplement the family income and had many short stories published in magazines and newspapers. Then, in 1862, during the height of the American Civil War, Louisa went to Georgetown to work as a nurse, but she contracted typhoid. Out of her experiences she wrote Hospital Sketches (1864) which won wide acclaim, followed by an adult novel, Moods. She was reluctant to write a children's book but then realized that in herself and her three sisters she had the perfect models. The result was Little Women (1868) which became the earliest American children's novel to become a classic

Customer Reviews

It was relaxing and fun to read.
Lola Jean Merrill
The chapters of Good Wives have been tacked onto the end of Little Women, so there's no need to buy them separately.
MysteryLoverTX
The second part of "Little Women" is "Good Wives" -- a very different kind of story about the March girls.
E. A Solinas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Patten on September 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a great book, and my favorite part of Little Women. It covers the part when Jo goes to New York and meets Professor Bhaer. However, when I ordered "Good Wives" I thought it was a sequel that I hadn't read before. Instead I found that it was a poorly bound and poorly copied (e.g. faint print that's hard to read) copy of Part II of the book Little Women. If you have the novel Little Women you already have "Good Wives." I sat the books down side by side and compared them, and they are identical. I'm confused why everyone is referring to this as a sequel to Little Women, unless perhaps when Little Women first came out it ended when the father came home from the war, and maybe Part II was originally printed in a separate volume?

However, every copy I've ever picked up of Little Women nowadays already has Part II in it, so if you have Little Women I'd advise you not to waste your money on this.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By "kaia_espina" on March 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Though "Little Men" was the first of the March family books that I read, when I was around seven, I was just as easily drawn by and to "Little Women". Not so with "Good Wives", the second book in the series (or "Jo's Boys", the last book, for that matter).
For a long time, there was something about "Good Wives" that I did not like, but could not name. Now that I am in college, learning from and loving this novel for the first time, I know exactly what was once so off-putting to me: "Good Wives" is about changing and growing up--things that were completely alien to me in elementary school.
In this book, Meg struggles to be a poor man's wife and a good mother--tasks more trying than being a dutiful daughter and a kind older sister. Jo learns to hold her "abominable tongue" (a slight disappointment, admittedly) and aspires to be more like Beth. Amy comes to terms with money, her limitations, and what she really wants from life. Laurie drops his rascal's streak and resolves to become more serious. In the saddest twist of the story, Beth dies.
The things that happen to the March girls (and the Laurence boy) are no longer the happy sketches of youthful scrapes, pranks and plays. By the second chapter, "The First Wedding", the first of them sets foot in the world of grown-ups, where actions have long-term consequences and one must make life-defining choices on one's own. The events in these books are sobering life experiences.
Much of "Good Wives" is made up of lengthy narrations--many passages quite preachy--that mostly illustrate what life-changing epiphanies the characters are having.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
This my favourite book in the series. With all the unexpected twists in an amazing plot I can see why Louisa May Alccott is so popular I am 14 and have just finished yr10 at high school and completed an Author review for english where I had to read all the books written by 1 author and I found that this was easily my favourite of the Little women series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
Sequel seldom works but this book is better then the first one, 'cause it explores the minds of it's charecters more truthfully then the first one.Here in this book they look more real and alive.The lose of the Beth is the great one but they bear it truely. Jo's charecter comes out so vividly that it dominated the whole book.It was a delight to read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
Louisa May Alcott captured the spirit of a loving family in "Little Women," the ultimate coming-of-age story. In "Good Wives," the second half of the "Little Women" story (and the second part of an ongoing family saga), Alcott takes her little women out of teenage hijinks and into a darker, more adult place.

The book opens with Meg March's wedding to John Brooke -- he's not the wealthy man of her dreams, but he is the man she loves. As Meg learns that it's a struggle to be a poor man's wife, her sisters Jo and Amy are stretching their own wings -- Amy is becoming an accomplished young artist, and Jo is letting "genius burn" as a published writer. Beth, who has never recovered from her bout of scarlet fever, is still a fragile homebody.

Things take an unexpected turn when Aunt March invites Amy to go to Europe with her -- a trip Jo has wanted for years. To make things worse, Beth is in love with Laurie... but then Laurie proposes to Jo. When she rejects him, he storms away to Europe. Jo leaves as well, to be a governess and a writer in the city, but returns home to find Beth slowly wilting away. Tragedy, love and new life will bring the family back together in unexpected ways.

It always hurts to grow up, and the events of "Good Wives" are no exception. It's a much more adult book than the first "Little Women," with the girls finding out about love, marriage, careers, artistic attempts and the loss of loved ones. There's plenty of humor -- Jo's disastrous housecalls and Amy's equally disastrous dinner party -- but it's muted.

Alcott's writing, surprisingly, doesn't change much -- it's still funny, weird and highly detailed, but also full of sweetness and pathos.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?