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  • Good-bye Pop National Lampoon (1975)
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Good-bye Pop National Lampoon (1975)


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Editorial Reviews

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Product Details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: EPIC
  • ASIN: B000URBE8A
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #357,208 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By will matt on June 14, 2009
I remember this album. I've been looking for it recently, hoping I would find a CD. I did not remember the name of the record, only that it was a National Lampoon record. I came across this listing by googling "there's a lobster loose", which is shouted by a drunken bar patron during a Country Western song. All the songs were pretty/very good, but add two stars because they were hysterically funny. I recall a Bob Dylan impersonator singing lyrics, "Take the J train down to Houston Street - it'll let you off in Jamaica" - a tasty little Reggae number. The history of the Beatles was told by a female narrator who was high on qualludes and/or heroin. My favorite line on the record was spoken by the British narrator who explains the history of rock and roll, describing how the music is an American form, derived from from African rythms and Negro Spirituals, but is "invariably best interperted by young, longhaired, British homeosexuals...". I would love to hear this again.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Epstein on July 16, 2008
I've owned this since the 70's, and hadn't been able to listen until recently when I got a new turntable. Undoubtedly one of the very funniest albums I have ever heard. It's a lot of fun trying to identify the 27 artists spoofed in the anthem. Gilda, Bill Murray, Christopher Guest, and on and on. I've got to go now... There's a lobster loose!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Adam Laceky on May 5, 2010
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In many ways, "Goodbye Pop" is a dry run for Spinal Tap, with a much greater range. Saturday Night Live alumni such as Bill Murray, Gilda Radner, Paul Shaffer, Christopher Guest and many more create a loving tribute to all that was wrong and fabulous with pop music, circa 1975. My favorite is "Art Rock Suite," which, according to the liner notes, has "twenty-eight groups wrong with this song. Can you name them?" (Pink Floyd, Jefferson Airplane, Yes, Queen, Focus, Led Zeppelin...)

Overall it is an absolutely brilliant parody, opening with a dead-on Elton John satire. (If anyone can tell me which songs in particular, please let me know. I heard the main target on the radio one day, but never found out what it was.) Gilda Radner does a hilarious send-up of feminist rock on "I'm A Woman," where she's the only woman in a studio full of men telling her how to do it right. And the Neil Young parody... Oh, man. You have to hear this.

Presented as a late-night radio station where Bill Murray lives out his secret life as Mel Brewer, the "unspeakably laid-back FM DJ;" this album will make you yearn for the simpler world of the '70s, when racist Soul music and sexist feminist rock co-existed with faux-fan remembrances of the stars he obviously never met (or even heard of).

I got this album around 1978, and wore it out. Then I got another copy. I wore that out, and then actually broke it last year after making a digital recording of it. Now I'm getting it again, and, man, I couldn't be happier.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Timothy S. Heater on August 18, 2010
I too listened to these songs over and over because, they are that good. They are a dead-on parody of 70's pop music. I came here to buy a CD copy and ended up writing a review. Please powers that be, bring it back. I am tired of being a "butchy bitch."
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