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Customer Discussions > Raising Sand forum

Good pairing, but ...


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Showing 1-25 of 48 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 25, 2007 3:02:21 PM PDT
... the song "Gone, Gone, Gone" is pretty awful. When Plant goes into one of his trademark, vintage Led Zep howls (think "Been a long time since I rock and rolled" - the "WOWWW-owwww-owwww" part) it just doesn't work. It's as if he needs to remind us that he's still the veteran Led Zep rocker, even though he's teamed up with the folkie kid. Plus the lyrics are pretty lame.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 25, 2007 4:59:12 PM PDT
Barbara Rose says:
Just my humble opinion - I think what you posted is unfair to Robert Plant - after all he's contributed to music and at 59 years old he's still going strong. Plus, it's nearly impossible to get a full feel for the songs with 10 sec clips.

I just think Robert Plant deserves more respect - again, that's just my humble opinion.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 28, 2007 8:41:04 PM PDT
J. Bilby says:
heard this song on the radio and it works
great pairing of artists excellent song!!
sorry don't agree with you, at all

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 29, 2007 2:01:32 PM PDT
Mark Trine says:
I heard that track, as well as the rest of the album and I can't seem to locate any of that over the top sort of singing from Robert Plant. He knows when and when not to use it. This album isn't the place for such things and if you want my opinion, I think this is a strong album for what it is meant to be.

The lyrics are lame? These are not supposed to be epic compositions. If you want a lyric driven album look elsewhere. This is fun at times, ethereal at others, and deeply emotional and expressive. I enjoy it.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 1, 2007 1:30:32 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 1, 2007 1:32:00 AM PDT
Graham says:
I am just listening to a promo copy of the album and it works very well.

Yes, it is a very weird musical juxtaposition, but sometimes, you have to mix things up a bit.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 2, 2007 8:18:15 PM PDT
K. Borror says:
I disagree, I think it's a really mesmerizing song/match up!

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2007 2:44:01 PM PDT
While I haven't heard this album yet, I think the match was and is a great idea, and I can't wait to hear it. Alison Krauss is pretty damned fine at what she does, and Percy is and always has been MUCH more than a heavy metal singer. Witness Led Zeppelin's third album (my personal favourite of theirs, sorely underrated) and much of his solo work of the last 15 years. He has sung at the Cropredy Festival with Fairport Convention, proven his vocal versatility on the Dreamland album and with the Afro-Celt Sound System as a guest vocalist, and most famously duetted with the late, much-lamented Sandy Denny on "The Battle of Evermore" on LZ's famous fourth album (and IMO, "Evermore" is the best track on that album). He also duetted with Tori Amos on a re-recording of "Down by the Seaside" from the Encomium CD--which was a Led Zep tribute album--that was truly interesting and different. I think this particular pairing, then, is a most welcome one. Besides that, not all of Led Zeppelin's lyrics were golden--many have slagged "Stairway to Heaven" as corny or cheezy at one time or another, and after you've heard it a million times, it really doesn't have the same power anymore. I think this is meant to be quite different from those, and that can't be a bad thing.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2007 11:20:12 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 16, 2007 11:29:48 AM PDT
Deimos says:
I think this is going to be a great album. But why some of you are actually picking on Plant's vocals, he completely outdoes Allison. Plant is a far superior singer he can sing any style of music and this album proves it. Allison however is a one sided wonder. I give this album 4 stars, solely because of Robert Plant's singing and most of the songs are great. A reworking of the Page & Plant tune "Please Read The Letter" is a nice inclusion as well.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 7, 2007 12:45:23 PM PDT
Chip in SF says:
Having listened to a promo copy myself, I can say that, being a fan of both artists, I was surprisingly pleased at how the two complimented each other, both vocally and musically. For those who think Plant should just focus on rock, you have plenty of other alternatives to choose from. I think this is a very unique album, very listenable, and pleasing to the senses.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 8, 2007 9:08:21 AM PDT
T. Lee says:
Hey P.M., I don't know where you've been for the past decade or two, but you've missed out on one of the best voices and one of the finest fiddle players in the world. Obviously Robert Plant knows talent when he hears and sees it. Open your ears and enhance the space inside. T.Lee

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 8, 2007 1:26:33 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 8, 2007 1:27:27 PM PDT
L. Dawe says:
P. Myers, in the 15 years that I have been following Alison Krauss' career, you are the first person who, being aware of her, has no appreciation for her virtuosity on the fiddle nor her pitch-perfect voice. What does that say about you?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 9, 2007 7:36:10 AM PDT
A. Burns says:
Because, P. Myers, even the ROCK God himself recognizes the Folk GODDESS when she comes along! Maybe you should expand your horizons... There are certainly more genre's to music than just rock. People, and yes - even Robert Plant himself, tend to recognize this and venture out to sow their oats for a taste of something they feel they might have missed out on in earlier years. Alison Krauss is the most perfect example of a musical voice to come along in decades. Plant is good at what he does, but Krauss is the BEST at what ALL of them do!

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 16, 2007 2:27:00 PM PDT
heavymanners says:
Robert Plant has always been a musical-ethnographer.... he's always been looking for world music influences, delta blues, American roots, skittle, rockabilly, reggae, Morocco, etc ....

Why would anyone be surprised that he would gravitate towards country bluegrass?

He cut a country tune way before Led Zep was formed.

Plant is a scientist and researcher of musical idioms and roots.

That is why he can still produce outstanding albums like "Mighty Rearranger" and mesmerize an audience whenever he steps out on stage.

His vocie is his second talent, after his mind.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 17, 2007 3:20:34 AM PDT
BDC says:
A surefire Grammy winner in several categories IMHO. Alison, Plant and T. Bone... One hell of a mix. Heard this album on line this AM and love it. Ordering it today. Alison could sing the dictionary and it would be a hit. Plant is an excellent counterpoise to her voice. He has grown and gone much farther that I would have ever thought from the LedZep days. I wondered what this combo would sound like and it's GREAT. T. Bone producing, well, he is no slouch either.

I'm an old time Bluegrass fan of AK from way back. She just keeps getting better and one of the best singers of both the 20th / 21st centuries. No wonder she has more Grammy Awards (not that Aretha F. isn't deserving...) than any other female artist. I met her once with my daughter in 1999 in Portland and she is the most talented, decent, humble artist I've ever met.

The last sound I want to hear before I die is AK singing.

An angel...

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 17, 2007 11:46:39 AM PDT
first of all, lyrically, they are not plants nor krauss's, its a cover of the everly brothers song, so your post automatically means nothing to me. at first listen i liked it, after the third listen i loved it, the Well o well! part caught me by surprise, but it works in well, this album will be a gem

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2007 6:06:31 AM PDT
pint6x says:
Gone gone gone is a great song - it works well because of the sparse production and the fact that Percy can now sing just as effectively without yelling Zep-style. I think the pairing works very well - sometimes less is more.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2007 6:05:02 PM PDT
Terry says:
Ok, Plant is responding to his country roots but, frankly, this ain't the ticket. I love love love Alison Krauss and am a die-hard fan from the early days. I also grew up on Led Zep. So, i figured this was the amazing amalgam of the century. So sorry to say, it just doesn't work. There's no rock & roll, there's no bluegrass. Their harmony is lovely but i wish they had some good songs. Half of the songs sounded like they belonged in an old Elvis movie like "Girl Happy". The other songs have a strong Russian gypsy strumming sound which nearly put me to sleepers. It's an amazing pairing but i wish it were better tapped.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2007 8:31:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Nov 2, 2007 8:32:44 AM PDT
"Folkie kid" makes me laugh. That's what she was 20 years ago. She's 36, not a kid except to old fogies like me and has more Grammys (20) that any female artist, including one or two for producing.

But yeah, when her first album came out when she was 16, she was sort of a "folkie kid.''

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2007 8:55:11 AM PST
JosephCa64 says:
Raising Sand is an astounding piece of work. This is what music should be about--daring, inventive, utterly different, even experimental. It is Plant's best work in years--his vocals are amazing throughout, subtle and restrained, but no less powerful.

And, the Townes Van Zant track Nothin' could be Plant's best rock moment since Led Zeppelin.

As for Miss Alison, what more needs to be said about her? She is one of the great voices of our generation, or any other.

I think Raising Sand is the album of the year. It should be anyway.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2007 1:42:56 PM PST
kk says:
Count me in as an admirer of this release. Even after just one listen, I find myself humming tunes and hearing the bass line along with it.
I really like the balance. Some how, minimally, they have avoided the commercial jingle with vocal tricks that so much pop/country has evolved to.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 17, 2007 1:49:12 PM PST
Frank Wallis says:
By jove, I'm humble, too. But I expect beautiful music from Alison Krauss (and Union Station with Jerry Douglass). This isn't beautiful music. It's the Grammy-winning Krauss attempting to elevate Plant to a place he can't go. It's a marketing ploy for new albums from both Plant and Krauss. I would guess a record company is behind this. It's not good for Krauss. At least one Krauss fan is grieved.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 17, 2007 2:02:53 PM PST
Frank Wallis says:
Don't deny Bell his due.
This album is a mistake. It is not the pleasant sounds we expect from Krauss. And what did we expect from Plant? Krauss can get away with this once, but twice and fans my be apprehensive. "What's she done this time?" the fan asks. "I'll wait ... buying gasoline."

L. Bell says:
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... the song "Gone, Gone, Gone" is pretty awful. When Plant goes into one of his trademark, vintage Led Zep howls (think "Been a long time since I rock and rolled" - the "WOWWW-owwww-owwww" part) it just doesn't work. It's as if he needs to remind us that he's still the veteran Led Zep rocker, even though he's teamed up with the folkie kid. Plus the lyrics are pretty lame.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2007 8:16:38 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 18, 2007 8:18:00 PM PST
JosephCa64 says:
It could very well be the album of the year. How anyone can say it isn't beautiful music is behind me. Killing the Blues is one of the most beauttful songs I have ever heard, as is Through The Morning, Through the Night, Stick with Me, Your Long Journey. It's vintage Alison Krauss and Robert Plant's vocal performance shines throughout. Polly Come Home and Nothin' are his best recordings since Led Zeppelin.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 1, 2007 4:03:08 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 1, 2007 8:41:43 PM PST
Frank Wallis says:
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Discussion in:  Raising Sand forum
Participants:  32
Total posts:  48
Initial post:  Sep 25, 2007
Latest post:  May 14, 2010

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Raising Sand by Robert Plant (Audio CD - 2007)
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