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Goodbye Mr Chips [VHS]

20 customer reviews


Product Details

  • Actors: Martin Clunes, Victoria Hamilton, Conleth Hill, John Wood, Patrick Malahide
  • Directors: Stuart Orme
  • Writers: Brian Finch, Frank Delaney, James Hilton
  • Producers: Judy Counihan, Kumari Salgado, Leila Kirkpatrick, Margaret Mitchell
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Wgbh / Pbs
  • VHS Release Date: January 6, 2004
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000WN14A
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #397,427 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

He went from teacher to legend in one lifetime.

Arthur Chipping, the Latin master at an English boys’ boarding school, is as awkward as he is stubborn. The eccentric schoolmaster lives a full, rich life within the cloistered school, defined by his role as the intellectual shepherd of generations of young students. Then, everything changes.

When Mr. Chipping travels through the countryside on summer holiday, he unexpectedly falls in love with the unconventional Kathie (Victoria Hamilton, Mansfield Park). The love and devotion of his new wife ignites his passion and brings him out of his shell, revealing the sensitivity lying beneath his gruff exterior. But after tragedy strikes, Chips’ true character is put to the test in the most difficult examination of his life. Ultimately, it is a lesson that will last a lifetime.

Goodbye, Mr. Chips is a tender, heartwarming story that spans over 50 years in one passionate life. Portraying the storied Arthur Chipping in James Hilton’s classic tale of love and transformation, Martin Clunes (Shakespeare in Love) turns in a bravura performance in a film filled with countless noteworthy turns.

Amazon.com

James Hilton's beloved novel is tenderly remade here with a British cast for ExxonMobil Masterpiece Theatre. British television actor Martin Clunes plays the schoolteacher over a 50-year period, from his first day as a novice Latin instructor until his death at 83 as retired Headmaster. The world and Mr. Chipping change dramatically over the decades. He marries a proto-feminist (British stage actress Victoria Hamilton) who nicknames him "Chips" and gives him courage to test his humanitarian impulses. World War I hits home in many ways, as a long roster of the school's graduates die or are maimed, and Chips struggles with the discriminatory exile of his best friend, the German teacher. Despite obvious breaks for commercials, this film has a graceful honesty that transcends the sometimes sentimental storyline. The casual cruelty at the all-boys school may make parents flinch more than their children, rendering this a safe choice for family viewing.--Kimberly Heinrichs

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 31, 2004
Format: DVD
Watching the 2002 BBC version of "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" has convinced me that I have to track down and read James Hilton's sentimental novella to see what is really there. Having a strong affection for the original 1939 film for which Robert Donat won the Best Actor Oscar, especially for the moment when Greer Garson notices that Danube really is blue, and having ignored the songs in the 1969 musical to focus on Peter O'Toole's performance, it was interesting to see what the screenplay by Frank Delaney and Brian Finch that was new and/or different.

Mr. Chipping is played by Martin Clunes, most familiar as Richard Burbage in "Shakespeare in Love," and while he has a certain timidity to him at first he is not as befuddled or as bewildered as his predecessors in the role. Saddled with the burden of teaching Latin in addition to being a new master at Brookfield School, Chipping is immediately tormented by his students. His reputation, not to mention his job, are on the line when he makes an example of a young boy named Colley, taking advantage of the boy's name to reduce the offender to a subject of ridicule in front of his peers. The scene is informative because it establishes the Chipping would prefer not to use corporal punishment.

There is clearly a theme to this version of "Goodbye, Mr. Chips," in that his abhorrence of the systemic bullying of younger boys at Brookfield is as strong as his love for the school, its traditions, and, of course, its boys. Time and time again, Chipping tries to stop the practice, but without success. Then he meet Kathie (Victoria Hamilton), marries her, and brings her back to the school (the moment when his colleagues are stunned to discover that Chipping's new wife is both beautiful and personable is also fun).
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Georgie on September 7, 2004
Format: DVD
This was released on TV in the UK during Christmas 2002. I was reluctant to watch at first being a big fan of the 1939 version starring Greer Garson and the wonderful Robert Donat; I was glad I did though.

It features areas of James Hiltons novel not covered in previous films. However, this makes them no less credible!

It will remain high on my list of favourite films!!
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34 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Burkett on October 19, 2003
Format: DVD
Though I may not have seen this DVD, I just saw the same exact movie on PBS only minutes ago. After it ended, I knew I had to get it, so I look it up on trusty Amazon.com, and to my amazement I find it here! Sadly, I'll have to wait to get it, but I must say that this was the most beautiful and moving cinema I've ever seen! The movie was absolutely genious and Martin Clunes, a favorite British comedy actor of mine from Men Behaving Badly, suited the character absolutely flawlessly. I cannot stress how highly I think of this movie, though I only saw little more than an hour of it. I can't wait to see the rest once this DVD comes out. I reccommend it to anyone who can comprehend something a bit deeper than an action flick of today, something rare I find. Still, this movie is great and you will love it if you have any sense of film appreciation at all!
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29 of 37 people found the following review helpful By MS on October 5, 2006
Format: DVD
Immediately after watching this movie I watched the 1939 version with Robert Donat. I was struck by how much better the earlier version is than the modern version.

The 1939 version assumes that the viewers have some intelligence. This 2003 version is dumbed down by comparison. The earlier version has more depth, and far more historical accuracy. The characters not as flat and one-dimensional as in the modern movie, and the story is more complex. It's also more moving, despite (or perhaps because of) not having the excessive and sickly sentimentality of the modern version. The political correctness and didactic undertones of the modern version are stifling by comparison.

Chips has a strong character and a sense of humor in the old version, while in the latest version he comes across as dull and weak. Robert Donat is a better actor and far more believable in the role than Martin Clunes. Donat deservedly won an Oscar for his performance.

Another important point is that the boys in the 1939 movie are far more real, far more lively, and far more appealing than the over-aged actors of the latest version.

I strongly recommend the 1939 version rather than this version. It's both better and more enjoyable.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Pamela G. Maher on April 16, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I'm such a fan of this story, especially as it appears on film in the 3 incarnations I've viewed so far. The 1939 version, starring Robert Donat and the beautiful Greer Garson is poignant and will always hold a dear place in my heart, mainly because it was the first version I watched. The 1969 musical version starring Peter O'Toole and the cheeky Petula Clark is SO 60s, but SO good. They are perfect together, and O'Toole is excellent as Arthur Chipping. And finally this version from 2002 starring Martin Clunes and Victoria Hamilton. I must admit, I never heard of either of these actors, nor anyone else in the cast, so I was initially skeptical that it would measure up to the other two renditions. As it turns out, the 2002 version has topped my list -- it is by far the best. So well done, it touches every emotion and leaves you thinking about the film and characters long after the DVD has ended. Martin and Victoria are brilliant. Not a single misstep will you find. You're truly missing out if you haven't watched this version yet.
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