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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on April 16, 1998
Louie Anderson does a wonderful job of revealing the true self. Especially the dialogue where he becomes Jumbo the elephant. He never mentioned a Love interest (human, not food) who could be support he so needed during these transitions he struggled with, the treadmill, death of his mom, selling the home, etc. Louie remains a real human, down to earth, complete with dysfunctional family. It was difficult to see him as the superstar wealthy comedian image we see. Whether it is food or some other controlling addiction, low self-esteem, children of alcoholics, pained school years, many can relate to his struggle. A good book by a funny man!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on July 28, 2004
Louie Anderson continues to battle the demons of his dysfunctional upbringing in this second of his three books. In his first book, Dear Dad, Louie focused on his abusive father's alcoholism and the impact it has had on the comedian's life and overall psychological well being. In this book, he tries to come to grips with his own obesity and the negative impact it has had on his life. He largely attributes it to his father's alcoholism and the lack of love he received as a child. Anderson's reflections are often laugh out loud funny. Yet, throughout the book, there is an overall sense of pain. As somebody who grew up battling obesity (I eventually lost 150 lbs), I can understand the psychological abuse that fat people receive on a daily basis. They are insulted, ridiculed, and treated like outcasts. This leaves the victim feeling angry, bitter, and very lonely. He or she turns to food to ease the pain, which only makes the problem worse. For anybody who has battled obesity, this book will be very therapeutic. If you've never had a weight problem, this book will no doubt give you more compassion for those who have. The 250 page book is an easy, quick read and is very inspiring.
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Dear Dad: Letters from an Adult Child
Dear Dad: Letters from an Adult Child by Louie Anderson (Hardcover - December 4, 1989)
 
     

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