Goodbye Rock N Roll

September 29, 2009 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 29, 2009
  • Release Date: September 29, 2009
  • Label: Electric Western
  • Copyright: 2009 Electric Western
  • Total Length: 32:18
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002MTXM5M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #337,652 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on February 26, 2010
Format: MP3 Music
Georgian-born Derek Hoke opens his debut with the album's bold title declaration: Goodbye Rock `n' Roll. It's an immensely catchy song whose pedal steel and thumping honky-tonk beat underline the bittersweet lament of a man who must bid adieu to his first love. Hoke declares his never-ending affection for rock `n' roll even as he falls further into the embrace of country music. He's confused and heartsick, but like the fatalism of film noir, he can't fight the impulse to turn down the amps and turn up the twang. He leaves behind the big guitars and screaming audiences with heartfelt, sweet sorrow.

Hoke styles himself a country artist, but there are rich threads of pop, folk and blues to be found in his music. The vibraphone chime of "Hot on the Heels of Love" lays behind a melody that's equal parts Buddy Holly and early Beatles, and the whistled solo adds to a satisfied, easy-going early-60s mood. Hoke is a pop omnivore who smoothly combines Lyle Lovett's ambling swing, Marshall Crenshaw's earnest pop, Dr. John's rolling funk and Hank Williams' twang. Mike Daly's steel nods to Williams' legendary sideman Don Helms, and Chris Donohue's double bass adds supper-club bottom end to several songs.

At first these seem to be songs of romantic distress, but Hoke's an optimist who dispels dark clouds with a never-ending view towards the sunny side. The frazzled morning-after of "Rain Rain Rain," delayed infatuation of "I Think I Really Love You" and unrequited longing of "Still Waiting" are voiced as hope and opportunity rather than defeat, and even the straying lover of "Not Too Late" is given one more chance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By I LIKe TACOS on March 26, 2010
Format: Audio CD
I found out about Derek Hoke through a youtube video of one of his songs and was smitten. The whole record is absolutely solid. In fact it is my favorite release of the last year. I purchase several dozen cd's and records annually (mostly in Americana and classic country). I cannot come up with an Americana release that comes close to this except for Hayes Carll's record... And I like this record better. So timeless sounding without sounding retro or dated. Simple catchy, smart, effective songs...
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