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Gorgias (The World's Classics) Paperback – December 22, 1994


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Product Details

  • Series: The World's Classics
  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (December 22, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192831658
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192831651
  • Product Dimensions: 4.6 x 0.4 x 7.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,529,141 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Greek

About the Author

Robin Waterfield was commissioning editor at Penguin between 1988-91, and now works as a consultant editor for Collins Harvill, freelance translator, and writer of children's books. His acclaimed translations of Plato include Philebus (1982), Theaetus (1987), Early Socratic Dialogues (1987), Republic (1993), and Symposium (1994). He lives in Teddington, Surrey. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Scott Carson on November 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
Plato's Gorgias is one of the masterpieces not just of the Western, but of any Canon, and Waterfield's translation for Oxford World's Classics adds an informative introduction and many helpful explanatory notes. I have used this text for years in my ethics classes, and every time I read it I come away with something new. Plato pits Socrates, the defender of moral realism, against three opponents who represent varying degrees of moral relativism: Gorgias, the Elder Statesman of Sophistry, Polus, a young turk who is quickly trapped by Socrates, and Callicles, one of the greatest characters in all of philosophical literature, who presents a case not unlike that of Nietzsche's Uebermensch. Though it is difficult to say whether Socrates is fully successful in refuting his interlocutors, watching him try is both exciting and informative, and can serve as an excellent introduction to moral philosophy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By BSprite on February 14, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An easily approachable work is not a common phrase for Plato, but this rendition of the Gorgias presents diction and translation in an accurate and approachable manner, and luckily for the reader includes the necessary Stephanus pages. The only gripe I have is the constant flipping to the rear of the book for the notes of the author. I much prefer chopped pages to a constant back and forth.

A student of philosophy and most classics students will find this a good enough translation, but of course anyone pursuing this into graduate studies will want to look at the original.
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An intriguing presentation of the ideas of the great greek philosopher socrates! Must read for anybody seeking to expand thier general skills at arguing as well as their general knowledge on the field of philosophy.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lee A. Freeman on October 7, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had to read this for school anyway but I found a new respect for Socrates. This book was written by Plato sine Socrates could not read or write. It takes place in Ancient Greece, Socrates is talking to politicians about rhetoric and it becomes a deep discussion about morality. To put it in simple terms. Good lessons though. I would say that it is actually a must read.
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1 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Marzano on November 11, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been reading some of Plato's diologues to find out more about Plato himself.

I consider these books to be light reading. They have a certain charm and you can relate to the various speakers of which Socrates is the main one for the dialogues I have read so far.

The main point here is comparing rhetoric or the art of verbal persuasion to philosophy.

Socrates' two great loves were beautiful boys and philosophy so you can guess which side Socrates was on.

He considers rhetoric to be a form of deception really which only superficially informs people for the sake of pursuasion for selfish motives.

Philosophy on the other hand is the real truth.

It talks about how if Socrates was ever pulled into court his lack of skills with rhetoric would make him easy prey for his accusers.

Since Socrates was executed perhaps this is what really happened I don't know.

I find these books interesting because Plato and those others believed in the mythological gods.

The explantory notes indicate that the three brothers Zeus, Poseidon, and Pluto divided up this earthly domain.

Zeus took the realm of the sky, Poseidon took the surface of the earth which includes the sea, and Pluto took the underworld.

Plato apparently didn't think too much of cooks. He calls cooking a knack and compares it to medicine which is a skill he says.

Plato gets carried away sometimes with his analogies.

Undoubtedly Plato's thoughts evolved throughout his life.

All of his many writings are I guess a snapshot of his thought processes at a particular time.

After I finish a few more of these dialogues I'll read 'The Laws' which I think was one of Plato's last works.

The next one on my list is 'Symposium'.

Jeff Marzano
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