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The Gospel of Jesus of Nazareth Hardcover – January 20, 2014


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 150 pages
  • Publisher: A.B.C. Editions (January 20, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 2954635207
  • ISBN-13: 978-2954635200
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,528,892 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

"The Gospel of Jesus of Nazareth is one of those adventurous books that causes a reviewer to wonder how it was ever achieved. I am reminded of the great fourth-century Christian translator, Jerome, who recalling his work of translating the Hebrew and Greek texts into Latin at the request of the reigning Pope remarked: 'Tears and groans were every day my portion!'  This book is not a believer's interpretation. In fact, Gillies describes his work as 'a freethinking attempt to cut straight through to the heart of the mystery' of the historical Jesus. Having found imponderable problems in the teaching of mainstream Christianity - teaching based presumably on the four Gospels - he has gone to the text with a will. While his work allows ample room for debate and critique, its style and aspiration invite reading and study."
- Robert Crotty, Emeritus Professor of Religion and Education, University of South Australia

From the Back Cover

"The real challenge presented to us by Jesus of Nazareth is neither his supposed divinity nor his miraculous works, but rather this: how are we to make sense of what must be seen as a keystone of his teachings - that he was to give his life on behalf of many, and that his followers must partake of his blood and flesh - within the context of Judaism, which had never ceased to condemn human sacrifice and to abhor anthropophagy? "

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dubious Disciple on April 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover
A fascinating look into who Jesus was and why he chose to die. Gillies says his new book is “A freethinking, scriptural look at Jesus of Nazareth & the Son of Man’s singular mission to free Israel from its tribal god.” While I hesitate to speak quite as bluntly as Gillies, I find much the same mission when I study the message of Jesus … particularly in John’s Gospel.

Beyond Gnosticism, edgy, down-to-earth, and a delight to read, here is a composite gospel you don’t want to miss. Gillies writes with the poetic beauty readers of the Bible have come to appreciate. But it must be read slowly; very slowly. I confess, his book will mean more if you know your scripture well, for then you will better recognize its depth, its subtle differences in emphasis and translation.

I’ve never been a fan of composite gospels, since to me they seem to disregard the individuality of the the Bible’s writers, each of whom had a unique theme or flavor to portray. But that’s not the point of Gillies’ work. Rather, you should read it as his own unique gospel, compiled from the stories of Jesus and the prophetic hopes written in the Hebrew Bible, meant to cut to the heart of Jesus’ purpose. It’s subtle; perhaps too subtle. Gillies says he is working on a commentary work that should render his gospel more accessible, and I very much hope he will share it with me for a further review. But for now, he should quit apologizing: we, the readers, may never uncover all the meaning he intended, but his book is still rich in meaning.

To that end, don’t you dare stop reading before the final page. Read that page again and again. Then go back and peruse the introduction, to see how masterfully Gillies has tied his thesis together, presenting a Jesus who followed a profound, brave purpose. Greater love hath no man!
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