The Gospel of Wealth (The Wisdom of Men Book 3) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$8.96
Qty:1
  • List Price: $9.95
  • Save: $0.99 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Gospel of Wealth (Little ... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Gospel of Wealth (Little Books of Wisdom) Hardcover – May 1, 1998


See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$8.96
$5.67 $5.27
Audio CD
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$10.32


Frequently Bought Together

Gospel of Wealth (Little Books of Wisdom) + The Way to Wealth (Little Books of Wisdom) + George Washington's Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation (Little Books of Wisdom)
Price for all three: $26.86

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Little Books of Wisdom
  • Hardcover: 28 pages
  • Publisher: Applewood Books; Reprint edition (May 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557094713
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557094711
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.4 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #350,046 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Andrew Carnegie began working in the steel mills of Pittsburgh at the age of 12. As an adult, he became the owner of Carnegie Steel Company. After it was sold, the company became U.S. Steel and Carnegie became one of the wealthiest men of his fay. He spent the rest of his life giving his vast wealth to help build libraries throughout the world, and fund other worthwhile social projects. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By seancarnes@aol.com on September 30, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This book is about 1/4" thick and is an essay written by Andrew Carnegie in June 1889. It's an interesting perpective on what very wealthy people should do with their money to improve society. He doesn't believe in handing over the cash when you die to your children but rather spending it before you die on free libraries, parks, etc. to improve life for the common man. It was recommended reading from a book on History of Wall Street.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By steve@learfinancial.com on September 20, 1999
Format: Hardcover
As a financial and estate planner this essay will redefine my practice. Common people today have accumulated far more wealth than they imagined. There is a struggle to determine the right course. Carnegie, about 100 years ago, had the insight to challange those of means to become trustees of our society. I am motivated and you will be as well. I read this is material that has made a large impact on Bill Gates. For those of you with excess assets PLEASE READ
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By M. Nowacki on July 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
John D. Rockefeller said this book inspired him. A previous reviewer said he read that it inspired Bill Gates too. It is no coincidence that Rockefeller, Gates, and Carnegie were the three greatest philanthropists in American history. These men have contributed more to America than 10,000 average people could. The following are just some of the contributions of the above three men: Carnegie Mellon, U of Chicago, Spellman College, Rockefeller University, medical advancements, public libraries, medical aid, art donations to museums, etc. They could have been like J. Paul Getty and hoarded the money, but they chose (or choose) to be great men.

The book talks about the responsibilities of wealthy people. Wealthy people have the opportunity to help people who don't have much opportunity and Carnegie writes about the responsibility wealthy people have to them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Ian Duckles on November 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Just a quick note, the essay is interesting, but it is in the public domain, and a complete text of the essay can be found with a quick google search. Don't waste your money.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
For those seeking an inspired depiction of the merits of capitalism shared with the philanthropic views of one of the most chartable men in history, the Gospel of Wealth will garner your interest. It is not often the thoughts of great titans in history are readily available to the public. Whether you agree with Carnegie's views or oppose his very existence, you cannot argue the manner in which he articulates his views is both moving and rational.

The Gospel of Wealth is both brief and available free of charge on the internet; however I reject the notion that Carnegie's work is diminished as a result. This book is a short essay that will take less than thirty minutes to read, but the content is lasting. My review measures the content of the book and accordingly I recommend reading the Gospel of Wealth.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Andrew Carnegie was a saint; he made a lot of money legitimately and even more legitimately decided it was his (Christian) obligation to distribute his wealth to have-nots-- conspicuously in the bequeathal to libraries which dot the American continent (including this Louisville from which I write.)

I read this book from the perspective of a pauper; while I do not have a great material wealth to distribute to a world, I have my poverty for its reasons. The take home message for me was: IF CARNEGIE CAN ASSUME THAT HIS RICHES ARE A GIFT, AND GIVE BACK, THEN I CAN GIVE THE GIFTS OF MY SITUATION TO A WORLD ALSO. What 'I have a lot of' is no-money and schizophrenia (the bane of my family); I can turn around this abundance in a responsible way and through responsible husbanding write my testament-in-blood to a perhaps less than loving world.

So I thank Mr. Carnegie, and take home my message about how I must give back my gift (poverty and psychosis-management) as my GOSPEL, by the changes of change.

--Vernon Lynn Stephens
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By C. Romaella on October 6, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The Gospel of Wealth is a great essay, but it's only the beginning. This book encompasses the whole of which "Wealth" was only the first breath. It's not vast in scope, but satisfyingly complete, starting at Wealth and its immediate responses, and ending at, if I remember correctly, The Advantages of Poverty (don't judge before you read it, any pinkos who see this review; it's not about poverty for others.)

Napoleon Hill's Law of Success also contains a similar article on the advantages of poverty by the then-editor of Ladies' Home Journal, but it's not the same thing- though that essay is more accessible in physical and social terms and may be a good substitute to placate aforementioned pinkos.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Certainly from a different age, but sage advice for old and new alike from history's richest man. Some really stimulating ideas on wealth creation, heirs and portions of weatlh passed on. Mr. Carnegie was incredibly rich from ingrained secrets from other books. This takes it to a higher level, seeking to learn what are some of the values and thought processes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?