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Got Sun? Go Solar, Expanded 2nd Edition: Harness Nature's Free Energy to Heat and Power Your Grid-Tied Home Paperback – September 15, 2009


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Got Sun? Go Solar, Expanded 2nd Edition: Harness Nature's Free Energy to Heat and Power Your Grid-Tied Home + Solar Electricity Handbook - 2014 Edition: A Simple Practical Guide to Solar Energy - Designing and Installing Photovoltaic Solar Electric Systems + Build Your Own Solar Panel: Generate Electricity from the Sun.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: PixyJack Press; Updated & Expanded 2nd Edition edition (September 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977372464
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977372461
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 7.2 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #935,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Learn a new vocabulary! Take a refresher course on the electrical power of the sun and the wind! Although the enthusiasm of renewable-energy experts Ewing and Pratt might get a bit wearing, they've developed a nontechnical reference and guide for home owners thinking about pulling the plug on their utility connections. In fact, after a look at the table of contents, the appendixes just might be the right place to start figuring out whether photovoltaic panel installation makes sense geographically and financially and which states offer rebates or incentives. A host of resources is also offered. Sidebars (e.g., special meter or no?) and trivia (e.g., the watt is named after its Scottish-born inventor) plus numerous charts, illustrations, and anecdotes help demystify the science and math. No windy authors here. Barbara Jacobs
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

A book that's on topic, to the point, and well-written! Without burdening the reader with off-on-a-tangent distractions or too little information, Rex and Doug have done an excellent job in addressing the more important bits of knowledge and information sought after by those wanting to get involved with solar energy. A true value of the book is found in the Appendices: there is a great amount of information to a large number of related, from lists of component manufacturers, to state agencies, U.S. maps of solar insolation, lists of organizations and associations, and others. --Richard Carter, GreenEnergyCafe.com

Are you connected to the grid but seeking independence from high energy bills? Looking to harness solar and wind power? Plenty of other books have surveyed the benefits of renewable energy or systems; but this is one of the few to add simplicity into the formula to make it possible for novices to convert. Chapters tell how to power an existing grid-tied home with renewable sources and how to make the conversion at minimum expense. From understanding a home's big energy wasters and how to contemplate either doing without or doing with less to sizing a system, obtaining permits for installations, and considering the pros and cons of manufacturers, Got Sun? Go Solar is a winning guide: specific where others just generalize. --Diane Donovan, California Bookwatch

Got Sun? Go Solar offers a clear and practical introduction for non-technical folks wanting to adopt solar electricity. And renewable energy dealers and installers will find it to be an excellent tool for helping their potential customers sort through all the options. --Chris Phipps, DC Power Systems, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

Very informative and easy to read.
ilona cunningham
If you are interested in solar power, then this book will get you started.
Markus Egger
The appendix and references are worth a lot on their own.
S. Valente

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

125 of 128 people found the following review helpful By Janet Rivera Switzer on September 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
I've lived off-grid with a PV system long enough to recognize how realistic and practical Rex's books and magazine articles on solar living are. Now preparing to build on property already furnished with grid power, I wondered whether a grid-intertie system was a good idea or if it would turn out to be just a costly indulgence of my renewable-energy philosophies. Now that I've met Rex and LaVonne, visited their PV-powered home, and read this book, I'm convinced that there will be no regrets.

Where I live there are apparently no financial incentives, other than net metering, for grid-intertie installations. This book points out that many states and localities do have quite attractive incentive programs and suggests ways to find out. If you live in such a place, lucky you! Go for it!

"Got Sun? Go Solar" doesn't provide all the information you'll need. There are too many variables: personal preference, budget, climate, local politics and attitudes, and so on. Rex and his co-author, Doug Pratt, have instead compiled a guidebook with enough technical background to understand the nature of grid-intertie technology plus resources (many on the Internet) where you can acquire the rest of the information you need.

Don't be concerned that this will be dry reading. The only "dry" is the humor that fills the book. In the world of PV energy there are many funny stories and you'll get to read some of them.
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70 of 70 people found the following review helpful By G. Bankston on November 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
I bought the Idiot's Guide and this book.

This book covers actual equipment and actual costs, a big plus

for me. I liked the technical information, maps, diagrams and

illustrations. You can find enough information in this book to

get started. It is complete enough that it may scare some people

into hiring a contractor to do the work.

There are some important technologies coming in the field of

solar cells. A friend builds satellites, and told me of PV

cell efficiencies of up to 26% and higher coming soon. Couple

this with the world wide shortage of PV cells, makes prices high

now.

All in all, you should have this book before you buy solar electric equipment.
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63 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Markus Egger on October 16, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are interested in solar power, then this book will get you started. It is a quick read and it will answer a lot of questions you might have at the very beginning of your journey towards a solar-powered home. Is it going to answer all the questions? No. But it will answer your fundamental questions, and after reading this book, you will know what questions to ask next.
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By S. Valente on November 9, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a quick read, and very informative as an introduction. The layout and progression of topics make it very easy to follow, and there is plenty of good, current information on how to get started on moving to solar power. Consultations with a couple of solar installers confirmed much of what I learned from this book to be true. The appendix and references are worth a lot on their own. Of course, you CAN find all this info on the web, but having it in one book to start out with is very handy.

Just keep in mind this is NOT a how-to. The author's purpose is to make you aware of what you need to know before you call an installer, not to tell you how to do it yourself, which he discourages for several reasons which he lists. But he does show you how to size a system and give you a fairly comprehensive look at the different options and configurations that are available.

Nice Job!
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on January 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
Are you connected to the grid but seeking independence from high energy bills? Looking to harness solar and wind power? Plenty of other books have surveyed the benefits of renewable energy or systems; but this is one of the few to add simplicity into the formula to make it possible for novices to convert. Chapters tell how to power an existing grid-tied home with renewable sources and how to make the conversion at minimum expense. From understanding a home's big energy wasters and how to contemplate either doing without or doing with less to sizing a system, obtaining permits for installations, and considering the pros and cons of manufacturers, Got Sun? Go Solar is a winning guide: specific where others just generalize.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By David on August 19, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting to read AND has useful information. With humor and spirit, the authors give information about solar power, wind power, and how to implement it for personal use.

They include

-how solar power works

-the system behind solar power in a home, including costs

-remarks on the products they most recommend, including different portions of solar and wind systems*

-cost analysis

-things to look into prior to setting up a home system

*they include many brands -- they didn't seem biased.

I won't be getting a solar system (first I would need a home), but this book was a great source for information for those interested in solar power for themselves or just in interested in the topic, in general.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Joel Hahn on April 27, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is an easy read and very informative about solar photovoltaics. And the price is right. It's written in layman's English so you won't get tangled up in highly technical jargon. There is also a chapter about small scale windpower. This book will tell you that 95% of solar PV installations are grid-tied and why. Yet it also discusses battery backup systems as well.

There are easy to follow diagrams for both grid-tied and battery backup systems. Of course some of the information has changed due to newer solar panels, inverters, etc. If you are considering a PV system on your home or just want information on PV systems, I would heartily recommend this book.
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