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210 of 223 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Happily in debt, for once.
I'm a grad student with no money and inexplicably picky tastes in audio equipment. Having acquired a high-end digital stage piano, I've spent the last few months piecing together a suitable setup for home use; in my case, 'suitable' means near-reference grade, but at a cost not exceeding what I can pilfer from Sallie Mae's purse.

Despite the fact that I play...
Published on September 24, 2005 by Matthew C. Ziegler

versus
31 of 40 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic sound, but.....
I have owned, over the past 7 years, at least 5 pairs of Grado headphones. My first three pairs were the lower priced models. When I found that the left headphone went out in right after the one year warranty ran out on the model, just below this one in price, I switched UP in price to this SR225. I now have owned two of these. I admit I absolutely LOVE the sound of...
Published on October 21, 2010 by Almost 50 Lassie fan


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210 of 223 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Happily in debt, for once., September 24, 2005
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I'm a grad student with no money and inexplicably picky tastes in audio equipment. Having acquired a high-end digital stage piano, I've spent the last few months piecing together a suitable setup for home use; in my case, 'suitable' means near-reference grade, but at a cost not exceeding what I can pilfer from Sallie Mae's purse.

Despite the fact that I play and listen mostly at night, I viewed headphones in proportion to their size: reluctantly, I splurged on a $30 pair of Sony oil-barrels.

But after a few weeks of headaches and ringing ears, I headed down to a boutiquey little sound emporium in Boston, having committed myself to spending $100, once and for all, on some SR80s.

Given the opportunity, though, I sat down in a studio and worked my way through the entire three-figure-price spectrum of headphones.

Grado yielded the most promising batch of candidates, but I was surprised at the variance among them: the product specs you read online for Grado really fails to emphasize this. The SR80s were everything I had expected, but then, the SR125s were identifiably more adept at rendering distinct voices within a choir.

Then, foolishly, I clamped on a pair of 225s: bass pours into your head with effortless clarity, background instruments that I never even heard on my old ear-traps were not only present, but warmly textured, etc. When I got them home, $175 later, I decided to baptize them by fire with a mix of Beck and Ben Folds Live, which I find stubbornly muggy at high bass and volume.

The 225s have revealed a completely unknown layer of instrumentation in some of my favorite Beck tracks -- I don't just mean there's a new cello back there: I mean there's a flute, a panpipe, a tapdancer, and a fat booger hanging out of the cellist's nose. As for the live recordings of Ben Folds, not only did the bottom-end piano hold up amidst the hum of the crowd, but you can actually hear people talking to each other in the audience in a couple of tracks that were recorded, it's now evident, in a small theater.

And as for my own piano, I can say that playing through headphones is no longer less desirable than through a set of very commendable Infinity speakers -- especially when I have the phones plugged into my amp instead of the piano itself.

I don't care how broke you are: if you listen attentively to your music -- and you have a quality home amp or receiver to drive these headphones to their potential -- you will not look back,

You might, however, benefit from calling around town... the internet isn't always the best deal for these sorts of products.
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170 of 191 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely the Best Cans available for $200 or less; Grado is the Best!, January 22, 2007
Ultimately, whatever I have written in this review below, please remember that with Grado, it is all about the sound and they have the awards to prove it! I have spent a lot of time and money looking for "THE" set of cans (audiophile speak for headphones) that would truly satisfy all aspects of my desire for the best sound available without having to go past the two hundred dollar mark. My search took me through Koss, Sennheiser, Sony, Bose and of course Grado. And Grado's motto of "Truly the world's finest" applies to all of their products made in America; I also own a pair of SR60 and SR80 cans from Grado so I know what I speak of about this company and their hand-crafted, American-made lovingly built product (only one exception, see below). They also have fantastic customer service and really know how to take care of you, even after a warranty has expired according to people I've spoken to. (I haven't had a need for warranty service, just for the record.)

I believe that all of Grado's cans are on the audiophile level as I have written in a review of the SR60 here on Amazon though they only cost $69 with perhaps the exception of the mass-produced, made in China iGrado model. As much as I love my Grado SR225 which I am reviewing, my SR60 cans are still in use, get five stars every time I put them on and are incredible! So imagine what I will have to say about the SR225! I've done the research, purchased numerous sets of cans from low-price and low-end to high-price and high-end and in the end, I absolutely believe that nothing beats the Grado SR225 unless you want to spend at least four to five hundred dollars and I believe you will still be disappointed unless that money went towards an even higher end set of Grado cans. For example, I do plan on saving my pennies and one day purchase a pair of their $495 RS-2 models that incorporates a mahogany wooden air chamber. But to spend the same amount on a set of Bose or Sennheiser will leave you feeling flat and not as impressed as with the $300 you could have saved by purchasing the Grado SR225 model in my opinion.

I realized a while back that I am an audiophile, someone who loves good sound and thus wants his cans to be able to reproduce those sounds as accurately and beautifully as possible. I've read many reviews, done countless hours of research, spoken with fellow audiophiles and I have come to realize that a true audiophile wants to share the knowledge he/she has acquired with others so they can make informed decisions. I've read reviews from people who claim to be audiophiles but they seem to suck the oxygen out of the room (so to speak) with their words and one quickly realizes that though they may know technical data, they have forgotten the joy and love of sound.

So back to the SR225 cans. As I mentioned, the SR60 model is a five star set of cans but I did make qualifications in that review. But if you are reading this, you want to know about the SR225 model. Yes, they cost $195-$200 and that is a lot of money for many of us. But what makes these five star audiophile cans better than the five star less espensive model? Basically put, it is the design of the can's transducers that allow for even more amazing sound reproduction. The back side has a full metal mesh screen which allows for more air flow. This matters on open backed cans. If you've ever put your hands up to an open-backed pair of full size cans and covered them, you know the sound would become "tinny" and diminished. What Grado did is take their award winning SR125 and increased the air flow by 50% and this makes a HUGE difference by increasing the sound stage! Highs, mids and lows are all so PERFECTLY balanced that it could make you weep with the right CD or DVD or even Video Game. I would recommend Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings, Bach, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Third Day or anything by Martina McBride as an example of what your cans "can" do or try "Million Dollar Baby" or "Unforgiven," "The X-Files," "Van Helsing, the London Assignment" on DVD and any "Call of Duty" or "Medal of Honor" video games.

Also, it's important to mention that these cans have only a 32 Ohm impedance so you can use them with low-powered portable devices and not burn out your batteries in one sitting because you have to turn the volume up to max just to hear anything as with some other brands. Yes, you may have to put the volume up 2-5 notches for CDS or MP3 CDS but that is negligible and depends on the recorded media. I personally have no complaints but if you really feel you need an amp, the handy and inexpensive Boostaroo works great for less than $30. The company really upgraded the circuitry and will increase the power 50-100%! But if you want an official "audiophile approved" amp, the HeadRoom Total Airhead Amp is recommended at $150. Grado makes different amps which can be used with any of their cans (and designed one of the amps to work with some other brands as well) but are primarily for the SR325 and higher and cost between $350 to $425 on-line. But again, I wish to emphasize that the Boostaroo really does the job for pennies on the dollar without scrimping on quality.

When I first listened to my Grado SR60's, I nearly jumped out of my seat the first time I heard a startling sound such as a thunderclap or the sound of a gunshot and I was extremely soothed by the sound of rain that I had never heard before on a DVD through television speakers. But with the modifications to the SR125 (which is based upon the same design structure as the SR80, also great!) such as improved diaphragms which are put through a special "de-stressing" process in order to enhance detail, voice coil design and UHPLC (Ultra-high purity, long crystal) copper voice coil wire, when I heard those same sounds such as the thunderclap, I DID jump out of my seat! And the sound of rain is so detailed, amazing and comforting. And classical music is even more amazing than EVER before. Instead of feeling like you are in the first row with some high-end cans from Sennheiser, with Grado you actually feel like you are standing next to the orchestra, the band or are in the movie.

You have to remember that with high-end cans, there comes a point of diminishing returns. The SR225 model is absolutely amazing for $200 but if you purchased the most expensive model in the Prestige Series (the SR325i) for $295, you might wonder "why" it costs almost a hundred bucks more. Are they better? Yes. A lot? Not much. The difference is there but you really have to put in the effort to notice it. In my case, the difference between the SR60 and SR225 is immediately noticeable but even the the difference between the SR80 and SR225 isn't "quite" as noticeable but definitely still there. Now if you purchased the RS-1 for $695 or the GS1000 for $995, you would notice a difference even from the SR225!

So in conclusion, I commend the Grado SR225 to you as the Absolute Best set of cans available on the market today for $200 or less. Just a few qualifications before I close: The 225 has a full size 1/4" inch plug so you will need a "mini" adaptor for use with portable devices and even some televisions, etc., which this model does not come with. Perhaps Grado is saying these are for home use but that's not the case at all. I recommend the Grado adaptor highly because it puts less stress on the plug. It is worth the extra money for Grado quality plus you get another 8-10 inches of cord! (If you need extension cord, I can tell the difference that is in the Grado extension cord as being superior by about 25% because it uses Grado materials and recommend it as well.) Also, for all that is wonderful about Grado's cans, some people do find them a little uncomfortable because the foam cushion does not all of the transducer. It is designed this way to increase sound stage but it can be uncomfortable if you aren't used to it. I can only say that the cushions do get more comfortable with time, you get used to the feel and the high quality in sound is worth it. If you really find them uncomfortable, I would recommend the foam cushions from the SR60 model as it is very comfy and covers the whole transducer. You can always cut a small hole about the size of a quarter to increase the sound quality if you feel you have lost something. But I find that either set of cushions works great with no modifications at all on all my Grado cans! Also, as with all audiophile cans, there is a break in period for maximum sound quality of about 30-60 hours but you will notice every time you use them. It's actually amazing to listen to the same musical piece, etc. over the break-in period and hear the difference. Also, less power is necessary to drive the cans at the end of the break-in period.

I believe that Grado has every right to claim "Truly the World's Finest" with the scores of awards they have won and I believe you can't go wrong with the SR225. It really is worth every penny and I hope I have been of help to you. Enjoy the world of sound Grado offers you!
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Killer 'Phones!, July 8, 2005
By 
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
Noteworthy for their eye-blinking impact and up-front presentation. If Sennheiser 'phones sound like the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, these sound like CBGB's. Considered by many to be the best rock headphones in the world. I like them quite well for jazz and classical (especially solo performances), but for rock they really do get your head banging!

Weakness include a narrow "in your head" soundstage, not the best build quality (plastic), some people find them uncomfortable (I don't. They're quite lightweight, but they touch your ears when you wear them, and some people just don't like that I guess), but the kicker is for them to sound their best you really have to change the pads.

"Change the pads..." you ask? For the most bass, do a Google for 'Todd the Vinyl Junkie' and pick up a pair of Grado flat pads. For the best balance (and to save a little money) go to Sennheiser's site and grab a pair of replacement pads for the HD-414s. They're yellow, and you have to cut a hole in them (about an inch and a quarter) but it's well worth it.

Probably not truly a 5-star 'phone in the grand scheme of things (like the Sennheiser Orpheus or Stax Omega II), but their strong suits are unmatched by any other manufacturer's headphones at any price.
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82 of 95 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grado SR225: Absolutely the Best Set of Cans for $200 or under; Grado is the Best!, February 4, 2007
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
Ultimately, whatever I have written in this review below, please remember that with Grado, it is all about the sound and they have the awards to prove it! And though I refer often in this review to other Grado models, the SR225 is my main focus and I simply use the other wonderful Grado products as reference. I have spent a lot of time and money looking for "THE" set of cans (audiophile speak for headphones) that would truly satisfy all aspects of my desire for the best sound available without having to go past the two hundred dollar mark. My search took me through Koss, Sennheiser, Sony, Bose and of course Grado. And Grado's motto of "Truly the world's finest" applies to all of their products made in America; I also own a pair of SR60 and SR80 cans from Grado so I know what I speak of about this company and their hand-crafted, American-made lovingly built product (only one exception, see below). They also have fantastic customer service and really know how to take care of you, even after a warranty has expired according to people I've spoken to. (I haven't had a need for warranty service, just for the record.)

I believe that all of Grado's cans are on the audiophile level as I have written in a review of the SR60 here on Amazon though they only cost $69 with perhaps the exception of the mass-produced, made in China iGrado model. As much as I love my Grado SR225 which I am reviewing, my SR60 cans are still in use, get five stars every time I put them on and are incredible! So imagine what I will have to say about the SR225! I've done the research, purchased numerous sets of cans from low-price and low-end to high-price and high-end and in the end, I absolutely believe that nothing beats the Grado SR225 unless you want to spend at least four to five hundred dollars and I believe you will still be disappointed unless that money went towards an even higher end set of Grado cans. For example, I do plan on saving my pennies and one day purchase a pair of their $495 RS-2 models that incorporates a mahogany wooden air chamber. But to spend the same amount on a set of Bose or Sennheiser will leave you feeling flat and not as impressed as with the $300 you could have saved by purchasing the Grado SR225 model in my opinion.

I realized a while back that I am an audiophile, someone who loves good sound and thus wants his cans to be able to reproduce those sounds as accurately and beautifully as possible. I've read many reviews, done countless hours of research, spoken with fellow audiophiles and I have come to realize that a true audiophile wants to share the knowledge he/she has acquired with others so they can make informed decisions. I've read reviews from people who claim to be audiophiles but they seem to suck the oxygen out of the room (so to speak) with their words and one quickly realizes that though they may know technical data, they have forgotten the joy and love of sound.

So back to the SR225 cans. As I mentioned, the SR60 model is a five star set of cans but I did make qualifications in that review. But if you are reading this, you want to know about the SR225 model. Yes, they cost $195-$200 and that is a lot of money for many of us. But what makes these five star audiophile cans better than the five star less espensive model? Basically put, it is the design of the can's transducers that allow for even more amazing sound reproduction. The back side has a full metal mesh screen which allows for more air flow. This matters on open backed cans. If you've ever put your hands up to an open-backed pair of full size cans and covered them, you know the sound would become "tinny" and diminished. What Grado did is take their award winning SR125 and increased the air flow by 50% and this makes a HUGE difference by increasing the sound stage! Highs, mids and lows are all so PERFECTLY balanced that it could make you weep with the right CD or DVD or even Video Game. I would recommend Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings, Bach, Vivaldi, Berlioz, Third Day or anything by Martina McBride as an example of what your cans "can" do or try "Million Dollar Baby" or "Unforgiven," "The X-Files," "Van Helsing, the London Assignment" on DVD and any "Call of Duty" or "Medal of Honor" video games.

Also, it's important to mention that these cans have only a 32 Ohm impedance so you can use them with low-powered portable devices and not burn out your batteries in one sitting because you have to turn the volume up to max just to hear anything as with some other brands. Yes, you may have to put the volume up 2-5 notches for CDS or MP3 CDS but that is negligible and depends on the recorded media. I personally have no complaints but if you really feel you need an amp, the handy and inexpensive Boostaroo works great for less than $30. The company really upgraded the circuitry and will increase the power 40-100% and has room for three plug-ins so you can share! But if you want an official "audiophile approved" amp, the HeadRoom Total Airhead Amp is recommended at $150. Grado makes different amps which can be used with any of their cans (and designed one of the amps to work with some other brands as well) but are primarily for the SR325 and higher and cost between $350 to $425 on-line. But again, I wish to emphasize that the Boostaroo really does the job for pennies on the dollar without scrimping on quality.

When I first listened to my Grado SR60's, I nearly jumped out of my seat the first time I heard a startling sound such as a thunderclap or the sound of a gunshot and I was extremely soothed by the sound of rain that I had never heard before on a DVD through television speakers. But with the modifications to the SR125 (which is based upon the same design structure as the SR80, also great!) such as improved diaphragms which are put through a special "de-stressing" process in order to enhance detail, voice coil design and UHPLC (Ultra-high purity, long crystal) copper voice coil wire, when I heard those same sounds such as the thunderclap, I DID jump out of my seat! And the sound of rain is so detailed, amazing and comforting. And classical music is even more amazing than EVER before. Instead of feeling like you are in the first row with some high-end cans from Sennheiser, with Grado you actually feel like you are standing next to the orchestra, the band or in the movie.

You have to remember that with high-end cans, there comes a point of diminishing returns. The SR225 model is absolutely amazing for $200 but if you purchased the most expensive model in the Prestige Series (the SR325i) for $295, you might wonder "why" it costs almost a hundred bucks more. Are they better? Yes. A lot? Not much. The difference is there but you really have to put in the effort to notice it. In my case, the difference between the SR60 and SR225 is immediately noticeable but even the the difference between the SR80 and SR225 isn't "quite" as noticeable but definitely still there. Now if you purchased the RS-1 for $695 or the GS1000 for $995, you would notice a difference even from the SR225!

So in conclusion, I commend the Grado SR225 to you as the Absolute Best set of cans available on the market today for $200 or less. Just a few qualifications before I close: The 225 has a full size 1/4" inch plug so you will need a "mini" adaptor for use with portable devices and even some televisions, etc., which this model does not come with. Perhaps Grado is saying these are for home use but that's not the case at all. I recommend the Grado adaptor highly because it puts less stress on the plug. It is worth the extra money for Grado quality plus you get another 8-10 inches of cord! (If you need extension cord, I can tell the difference that is in the Grado extension cord as being superior by about 25-40% because it uses Grado materials and recommend it as well.) Also, for all that is wonderful about Grado's cans, some people do find them a little uncomfortable because the foam cushion does not cover all of the transducer. It is designed this way to increase sound stage but it can be uncomfortable if you aren't used to the Supra-aural (on the ear) style. I can only say that the cushions do get more comfortable with time, you get used to the feel and the high quality in sound is worth it. I fall asleep in them regularly! If you really find them uncomfortable, I would recommend the foam cushions from the SR60 model known as S-Cush on Amazon as it is very comfy and covers the whole transducer. You can always cut a small hole about the size of a quarter to increase the amount of sound if "muffled" as some have claimed about these cushions but I don't notice it. I find that either set of cushions works great with no modifications at all on all my Grado cans! Also, as with all audiophile cans, there is a break-in period for maximum sound quality of about 30-60 hours. It's truly amazing to listen to the same musical piece, etc. over the break-in period and hear the difference. Also, less power is necessary to drive the cans at the end of the break-in period.

I believe that Grado has every right to claim "Truly the World's Finest" with the scores of awards they have won and I believe you can't go wrong with the SR225. It really is worth every penny and I hope I have been of help to you. Enjoy the world of sound Grado offers you!
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34 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My roll has been jellied!, February 5, 2007
By 
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I honestly did not know what to expect when I opened up the box that contained My pair of SR-225's. I spent several weeks mulling over every pair of Grado cans (I am now officially allowed to use the word "Cans" because I am a proud owner!) from the SR-80's to the RS-1's. I was "this" close to getting the RS-1's but in the end I couldn't justify jumping from $20 Sony's from Target to the $700 Mahogony Bohemoths. So I modestified (I made that word up, right now) myself and resigned to only spend $200. WOW! Holy Moly! I now know exactly what "soundstage" means! Man, it's like I am in the studio sitting between 'Trane and Bags at Atlantic , and there is Ahmet's brother Nesuhi on the other side of the glass, wearing a pair of Grado's! (Did they make Grado's in 1961?) Everything comes through so clear! I think I can even hear Coltrane tighten his belt between takes! When Milt Jackson starts hittin' those high notes on the Vibes I no longer cringe! I think I just heard someone wisper!! I cannot express my Gradotude enough for such an amazing listening experience. If you love your music and only like your money buy a pair, if you love your money...shame on you. Now, you feel bad don't you? Well, get these headphones and you'll feel better!
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A note about the break-in period., January 17, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
If you're an audiophile and somewhat of a coneseuir of high quality headphones, you should know that most high-end headphones require a break-in period for the diaphrams to loosen up and provide the best quality sound the headphones can deliver. Why? I'm not entirely sure. No other speakers of tradition design require such. And I say traditional design, because instead of some of the modern speaker cone designs found in computer speaker systems the diaphram in these headphones actually is a "standard-looking" speaker rather than a cheap metal diaphram with limited sound reproduction capability. Pull the ear foam off a cheap pair of headphones and take a look at the spiraled metal diaphram that consists of the "speaker". With Grado headphones, you get get a real speaker in each ear piece.

But what I'm saying with regards to the break-in period, allow them to get a thorough breaking in before you judge the headset. Because I, myself, was beginning to question my investment. I was also wondering if I had enough power driving the set. I run them through the external "remote" for my amplified 5.1 speaker set for my PC, which has more power than the standard headphone jack on the PC itself. But as the headset breaks in the sound gets better and better. I'm hearing things in songs that I never knew were there before. Even through the surround speakers themselves.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT SET OF HEADPHONES, November 5, 2005
By 
L. Mitnick (Chicago, Illinois United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I never really felt I needed or wanted headphones, but after a complaint from a neighbor that my music was too loud, I figured that it might not be a bad idea to have them if I wanted to listen to music or watch a DVD at later-evening hours. Well, now that I have them, I am never without them. The sound is clear, vivid, and immediate. Of major importance to me is the comfort. Many headphones used to give me a headache and cause pain around the outside of my ears. These do not. They are an integral part of my sound system, and I recommend them without reservation.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Over 3 years with my SR225 headphones, July 28, 2011
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I write in part to share my experience and in part to address some of the complaints from the 3-star reviews.
I bought my Grado SR225 headphones over 3 years ago. I was using AKG K270 back then, as well as 2 other headphones but I can't recall the specific models.

My use has been mainly for recording and mixing audio (along with studio monitors), listening to music and movies (computer), listening to audio (portable CD/MP3 player), listening to music and movies (Sony radio and DVD/Tape/CD player), guitar modeling processors, etc. After 3 years, I have not experienced a problem with my Grado headphones.

Would I buy or recommend these for use with an iPod or iPhone? No.
Grado has the iGrado for this type of devices, but I have never used them. There's also the SR60.

Would I recommend them for hip-hop or other bass-heavy sounds? No. This does not mean that the SR225 can't handle bass parts. It handles them fine, but it's more for bass parts that are heard instead of felt. As a test I just listened to some tracks by Abe Laboriel, James Jamerson, Nathan East. Obviously it lacks the "thump" I could get from my studio monitors, but the bass parts were clear and defined.

Regarding the "leather" band not being leather, where does it say that it is leather?
Regarding the thick, "pretty long" adapter cable, the one I bought -Mini Adaptor Cable- is quite short at 8 inches. There's also a 15 feet Extension Cable. Each person can buy the one they want or need.

The bottom line is that these Grados excel at sound quality, clarity, and definition, and are great for a wide variety of genres. Other headphones sound muffled in comparison. The downside is that they're indeed uncomfortable for prolonged use. It does get better, and I can use mine to watch a 2 hour movie or listen to music for a few hours, perhaps just taking a small break occasionally.

Are they worth it? Depends on your ears and your needs. After more than 3 years of use to me they've been worth every penny.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best Available for the Money, November 23, 2007
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
First let's dispel the notion that the style of these cans somehow makes the user look like a clod when wearing them. They ars retro in styling, but they're not oulandish. You'll look a lot more like an idiot wearing the sennheiser wireless series than wearing these.(this is for the folks that REALLY care what they look like when wearing headphones)
As to sound these are the best that can be had for $200.00, the sound reproduction is fantastic even at low volume. These are for audiophiles and people of discernment that really like listening to music.
Check out reviews on the web for these and know that the raves these cans are getting are really deserved.
If Grado decided to mass-market their headphone line, i think that they would become a household name in a relatively short period of time
As to comfort these hold up about as good as the competition, some people may find them slightly better, others slightly worse.
These are the real thing if your looking for great music and home theater sound reproduction in your headphones. I rate them a best buy.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great for slow music (jazz, indian/western classical, hindustani), November 13, 2007
This review is from: Grado Prestige Series SR225i Headphones (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I purchased this product after reading rave reviews about it, especially for listening to jazz. I have not been the least bit disappointed.
It sounds amazing. The only constraint on these "cans" is the sound quality which completely depends upon the quality of the source of music.

If your only source of listening to music is MP3 players or AM/FM, I would not recommend them. But if you listen to music with high bit rates 320 KBps+, flac files , CDs or DVDs with quality sound output, I would totally recommend these. I use a Cowon iAudio X5, and it sounds amazing with these, especially since most of my collection is in the flac format.

The reason I did not give these headphones a 5 star is because inspite of bieng very versatile (musically) and in terms of the instruments you could pair it up with (mp3 players, musical instruments, high end systems) it comes with
1) A very short cable which restricts movement, especially when your playing instruments. You will have to buy an extender, which costs money.
2) A 1/4" connector. If you wish to connect it to an mp3 player you would have to get a converter from 1/4" to 1/8", which makes it inconvenient to attach it to tiny players. I believe headphones should come with 1/8" connectors so you can attach to bigger instruments using a converter and at the same time comfortably attach them to tiny mp3 players.

One other potential problem with these is that they are open headphones, meaning if you are listening to music even at reasonable volumes, people around you will get disturbed. Quite a bit of the sound from the speakers leak out. So using them at work or in public places might be out of question.

But the bottom line is that these are the best sounding headphones I have ever used. They are very comfortable (I have small ears) and they fit very snugly. I have used them for several hours on a stretch without fatigue. You can use them without having to resort to purchasing costly headphone amplifiers because they only have 32 ohms for impedance which is why they work well with decent mp3 players. But if you have a weak mp3 player, get a cheap amplifier. I purchased a Boostaroo, but haven't had to use them.

Overall: Very Highly Recommended.
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