Customer Reviews


239 Reviews
5 star:
 (101)
4 star:
 (55)
3 star:
 (42)
2 star:
 (26)
1 star:
 (15)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


56 of 61 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars GT5 Prologue - some improvements, some issues remain, great for fans
Note, my opinion is based on the PS3 version while driving with Professional physics, ASM/TCS off, using a Sparco cockpit and Logitech G25 wheel.

PRICE - nearly a no-brainer buy for fans; but a little high considering it's a prologue, limited number of events and cars.

GRAPHICS - improved as expected given the possibilities of the PS3. In a way the...
Published on April 22, 2008 by Racer Hex

versus
188 of 244 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Different console. Same problems.
Right up front, I'll point out the three most obvious things about GT5 Prologue.
1. It looks gorgeous
2. The AI is abominable.
3. There is still no car damage.

To use a lovely english expression : it's all mouth and no trousers. Look past the HD graphics and hype and you'll find Gran Turismo 1 lurking here.

The Gran Turismo games are...
Published on May 25, 2008 by Chris Longhurst


‹ Previous | 1 224 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

56 of 61 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars GT5 Prologue - some improvements, some issues remain, great for fans, April 22, 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
Note, my opinion is based on the PS3 version while driving with Professional physics, ASM/TCS off, using a Sparco cockpit and Logitech G25 wheel.

PRICE - nearly a no-brainer buy for fans; but a little high considering it's a prologue, limited number of events and cars.

GRAPHICS - improved as expected given the possibilities of the PS3. In a way the sensation of speed has decreased, an ironic side effect of the smooth picture quality. It's easier to look further into the distance.

SOUND - really stunning, accurate, raspy, and powerful. Enormous help to the gameplay to hear unique exhaust notes for each car. Huge improvement from GT4.

CARS - there are plenty of great cars for everyone - rather than recreating hundreds of nearly identical and/or boring, useless-for-racing cars, this game sticks to the cars that are meant to go fast, and does them well. The sound and handling of each is unique and seems to be accurate. And the Ferrari F2007, once you beat the S races and earn the required 2 million credits, is just so cool to drive (even though its quick tune options are limited - you can't modify the power, weight, ride height, springs, or driving physics).

TRACKS - the Daytona trioval is a lot more interesting to drive than a super speedway like Motegi. Daytona also comes with a road course, and even though I feel driving a road course in the infield of an oval feels a bit unnatural, it's still a fun course. There's also Fuji, Suzuka, London, and High Speed Ring. Not bad.

AI - improved number and varied driving personalities, but they still defy the rules of clean racing and the laws of physics with impunity. They drive right through you as you serve your penalties (which they often cause). You'll see shortcutting, using runoff areas for acceleration, wallriding, refusing to back off even when their line is hopeless, and of course bumping and shoving you, leaving you to collect from the new array of infractions. It's getting a bit harsh, but the restart button is only a menu away.

HANDLING - if you select "standard" the cars handle pretty much like they did in GT4; if you put it on "professional" then it takes on a more realistic (i.e. unforgiving) character. Default settings are a little mushy even with cars you'd expect to be nimble, and the professional physics render the supercars (Corvette, Ford GT, Ferrari) nearly uncontrollable. After unlocking the S group and quick tune, some cars can have their downforce cranked up to get some handling back, but cars that are more about beauty than function don't have this available. Many of them remain just a tiny mistake away from an unrecoverable slide. No wonder so many inexperienced drivers crack them up (especially if they turn off the driver aids). I completed all the races (except three of the S races) on "professional" but since the AI is not subject to the same realities, you may occasionally need to set it back to "standard" in order to be competitive.

So far the game has overall been enjoyable, and much of the struggle can be overcome by selecting the correct car for each race, just as it was in GT4.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


188 of 244 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Different console. Same problems., May 25, 2008
By 
Chris Longhurst (Salt Lake City, Utah United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
Right up front, I'll point out the three most obvious things about GT5 Prologue.
1. It looks gorgeous
2. The AI is abominable.
3. There is still no car damage.

To use a lovely english expression : it's all mouth and no trousers. Look past the HD graphics and hype and you'll find Gran Turismo 1 lurking here.

The Gran Turismo games are known for their accurate car handling and fantastic graphics, and GT5 Prologue is no exception. The problem is that it is all absolutely ruined by the other driver AI. Previous Gran Turismo titles have never exactly shone when it comes to the AI, but in GT5 it's simply non-existent. It's not that the AI is dumb, it's just not there. The other cars all drive on rails, irrespective of where you are. For example, on the High Speed Ring circuit - there's a challenge to get from the back of the pack to the front in a single lap. In the car they give you, it is 100% impossible to come any higher than 3rd, and that's a stretch. The driving-on-rails is so accurate and predictable that you can actually predict exactly where every car will be at any given point. You'll come up behind the Ford Focus at the end of the second turn, and don't even think about passing him on the outside because he will always jink to the left for no reason as he goes across the bridge. If you're in the way, then tough. The game will just force you off the track. At the next corner, the Mazda 6 will always follow the identical line inside the corner, again irrespective of whether you're there.
The same is true in the other types of race. Within minutes of playing this game, you will find yourself making a tidy corner only to have a much faster car come right up behind you and ram you off the track because you're in the way of it's pre-programmed line. To see how truly awful it is, start a race at the back and watch the 15 cars in front of you. They'll all cut the same corner in the same way, every lap, all with the identical puff of dirt as they do it.
It is simply abominable.

The problem is that this issue was solved long ago by the likes of - well - just about every other racing franchise out there. It's compounded by the fact that there is still no car damage or dirt in GT5. You can stuff any car into a concrete armco at 175mph and it will simply bounce off without so much as a scratch. To think that Polyphony could put out a game with no car damage and ruinous AI on a next-gen console in 2008 just boggles the mind given how accomplished the competition is (think: Project Gotham Racing).

So what about the eye-candy aspect? Well - it runs at 1080p (full HD) and it looks absolutely spectacular. The textures are crisp and don't blur out at highly obtuse angles like they would on an X-Box. The car models are beautiful as are the various effects like the real-time reflections and the colour-flip paint jobs. There is some aliasing on high-contrast areas but detail popup is minimal. There are very noticable level-of-detail swaps on some of the cars where they swap from a low detail to a high detail version. It's most noticable on the Daytona circuit where you'll occasionally see the shading on the back of a car pop noticably as the model swaps to it's higher resolution version. In fact the eye-candy aspect is only marred slightly be the fact that the game clearly doesn't run at 60 frames per second. Well - it does on sparsely populated tracks but in the thick of the action on some circuits, you'll see noticable slowdown which you just shouldn't have on a console as powerful as a PS3.

What other things to know about? Well the online aspect of the game has a lot of promise but it's buggy at best. If your PS3 isn't set up pefectly on a broadband network (NAT type 1) it just won't connect to the servers. If you're lucky enough to have a good setup, then even when it does connect, the racing is a bit dodgy. It's obvious that the sample rate for your system communicating with all the others is fairly slow as you'll often see your opponents cars jump across the circuit from one side to the other, or suddenly appear to brake or accelerate at light speed as the servers catch up.

When you come to use the game for the first time, be prepared for a long wait. It seems to copy the entire blu-ray disc on to the internal hard drive which takes a good 15 minutes, then as soon as you connect, it will download a huge update which will take 5 to 10 minutes to download and another 5 minutes to install. So out-of-the-box to first race is about 30 minutes. That seems a bit odd to me - I was entirely expecting the game to run off the disc like many of the other PS3 titles.

So GT5 Prologue : it's great eye-candy, sure. But the two biggest, most long-standing problems with the GT franchise are still present. Awful AI and no car damage. The press previews and talk from Polyphony indicate that the full game will have car damage, but historically, they've never been known to change their underlying game engines between the 'Prologue' and the full versions of GT. They have always claimed that they've fixed the AI with each successive version of the game, but honestly - GT5 Prologue has taken a massive step backwards. They say it's better than ever but it's actually worse than ever. So when they say there will be car damage in the full game, I say 'cry wolf' I'm afraid.

It's an ominous omen for GT5 later this year. Sure it'll have more cars and more tracks. But chances are it will have the same problems the GT franchise has always had, and that's simply not good enough. Couple that with the questionable frame rate and online problems and that could be disastrous.

I dearly love the GT franchise - I've had every one of them and I've been hoping and praying that they would one day fix the AI problems and the lack of car damage. If they've not done it on the PS3, then it's just never going to happen, and that is a sad indictment of Polyphony's marketing strategy. I've played this game a lot, desperately wanting to like it but I always put the controller down and am left with an empty feeling. It's just not exciting.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars HOLY PENALTY, April 18, 2008
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
The game is as good as the last GT game, graphics are better and the cars seem to respond more lifelike but and this is big, the tuning aspect is maybe 15% of what it was and WOW!!!!! the penalties in the class S races are EXTREMELY FRUSTRATING, for example you hit a car and get a penalty usually about 3 to 5 seconds depending on how hard you his the other car. But if a car hits you no penalty for the cpu car and if that car pushed you off track guess what 60% of the time you will get a short cut penalty for going off the track, when that car hit you, it will drive you MAD!!!!! Every car you want to play with you have to buy and if you don't like it you might get back 1/4 of it selling price when you sell it back and when money is hard to come by unless you play online it makes it tough not to be forced to play the same quick big money race over and over and over just to get the cash to buy the many cars you have to buy to complete the game, for example, you have to purchase a BMW M3 100,000, a Ferrari f430, 250,000, a Ferrari 599, 350,000 a Ferrari f40 450,000 and a few other cars to complete the game and with the prize money for the races around 20,000 for first and always having to start 16th rather that QUALIFY it makes it tough and like I said FRUSTRATING. I want to trade it in but I just can't because I am a fan of the game but its sometimes hard to play for more than 1 hour before your blood begins to boil.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


28 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Same Old Same Old, Though a Bit Prettier, June 12, 2008
By 
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
Another great looking GT game with semi-simulation game play and some annoyingly unresolved core issues. Your opponents are still mindless cruise missiles who do not respond to your presence on the track at all and who never make mistakes. Plus damage modeling remains absent, though promised DLC sometime this summer is supposed to address that issue. Those of us who remember the "damage" system from GT2 (or Forza for that matter) where you hit a wall at 140 and then the car pulls a bit to the right may be a bit skeptical as to how this will be implemented. The usual GT combination of annoyingly flawless competitors and no damage makes using the other cars as bumpers to improve cornering as tempting as ever, especially in some of the more brutally difficult challenges. (See below.)

This specific implementation has some unique issues. Those of you who feel the GT-R is a bit over-hyped will quickly grow tired of all the added background content about that vehicle in the game. Much like the Acura NSX was the former over favorably modeled vehicle in prior GTs, the GT-R here seems a bit too perfect. A good third of the 75 cars in GT5) featured are useless and boring, a familiar problem from GT4 with its dozens of bland Japanese cars that those outside the Nipponese car buying market could care less about. (5 Skyline Models! 7 Suzuki and Daihatsu Micro-Cars!) However, most of the cars here are reasonably interesting and the graphics are beautiful. The handling model also appears to be as accurate and distinctive for each car as might be expected.

The mere six tracks in the game grow very tiring very quickly. The Daytona oval is as dull as could be imagined, and the London circuit, though gorgeous, is under-utilized in the actual in-game events due to the fact that it has no decent straights and too many sharp angled turns.

Besides bad opponent AI, no damage, GT-R propaganda, a few dull cars, and a teeny variety of tracks, are there any other problems? You betcha! The real problem here is the gameplay. There are about 40 races in the game total at this point, grouped into 4 tiers, each of which must be completed in order to advance. Some of the races, especially in the A tier, are vastly difficult especially A-8, the Ferrari pass them all in one lap. If you can't win that last race in the tier, you need to grind away over and over until you finish it in order to advance.

When you finally get to the last tier ("S"), you will be disappointed; though you can now finally tune your cars, your tuning options mainly amount to either minute changes in camber and brake balance a la NASCAR, or beefing hp up / weight down or vice versa in order to balance cars out in each race. The added "joy" of S class racing is the return of the GT4 5 second penalty for bumping other racers and / or the landscape. As was also the case in GT4, you are penalized even if the drone racers hit you, while they are not.

The game so ends with a whimper rather than a bang as you strap weights onto your car to trim it into the point category, and then grind your teeth in frustration as your cruise missile opponents hit you from behind and vanish into the horizon as you lose the race because of the penalty levied because of the unavoidable and unintentional collision. An actual damage system and opponents with more brains than a pigeon would be a much better solution to the bumper cars problem, but this is what the geniuses at Polyphony give us instead.

To add insult to injury, the GT crew in recent news have announced that the actual GT5 game may not be out till 2010 and the much hyped DLC upgrade may not be out in summer 08 as originally promised. Lovely! In the meantime, why buy this at all? I would suggest buying Grid instead, which is a fully realized game with functional damage, an actual campaign structure, challenging artificial opponents who also make mistakes and even crash at times, and more than twice as many tracks. Sure there is no trendy BGM, the handling is not as realistic, and there are less cars modeled than GT5P, but damage and human style opponent AI more than make up for those deficiencies.

Rent GT5P if you want to see the pretty graphics, play Grid during the loooong wait for the real GT5 and then see if the end Polyphony product is a worthy enough game to spend 60 clams on. Content and graphics in the GT games are fine, but the series needs to see damage modeling and more challenging competition in the single player game in order to remain a viable contender in the next-gen racing game market.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing introduction to the franchise., July 30, 2008
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
I've been a fan of racing games for a long time, and actually race in various forms of SCCA racing myself. I've raced high and low powered front and rear wheel drived cars and have learned a lot through competing and the various schools and classes I've attended. I had never played a Gran Turismo game prior to Prologue, having always had XBox or other consoles previously. I had heard so much about it that I didn't even bother with demos and simply bought the game the day it was available. Now having played it for several months all I have to say is I don't think I'll even consider buying the full GT5 whenever it makes it here.

My major gripes are as follows:
1) Atrocious game play layout
2) Poor physics
3) AI and damage are absolutely laughable.

To start with the game play is ridiculous. It reminds me of the old days of games where you do routines over and over and over to gain points/experience/money to buy the next level. The success you have in the races and your carrer mean little in GT5, only if you have the right car or not. You can breeze through each of the various classes by simply buying the right car. Buy the Ford Focus for C class and you cruise through... buy the GT-R for B class and you cruise right through. Buy the Ford GT for the A class and you cruise right through. The only hitch is the little added difficulty of the car specific races. So then you have to repeat races over and over to get enough money to buy the random extra cars. Disappointing, tedious and overall abysmal game play layout.

The online gameplay is even worse... it degrades into bumper cars with idiots and no penalties of meaning, and the pairing system and time from game to game is horrible! It is a very nice touch though that you can actually earn money racing online for your offline activities. That I thought was well though out and appreciable.

On to the physics. I've spent years learning to drive the right way and how to execute proper control. There are tricks of the trade on how to guide a car through certain types of corners and how to achieve certain handling. It simply does not exist in this game. Trail braking and various power on scenarios are not met with the appropriate vehicle responses. Additionally, vehicles with wildly different characteristics will handle nearly identical in this game. It doesn't matter what aids are or not enabled, or what level of physics you choose. Throttle on response was one of the poorest aspects I though in general, but turn in effects weren't far behind! Amazingly pathetic for a game that bills itself as a "the real driving simulator". It also appalling that in some cases the fastest way to execute part of a track is to bounce yourself off a fence or wall. I started doing it out of humor and was horrified to see it actually help in certain situations.

The AI and damage are really in that same vane. They do nothing, they don't exist, and it's all just superfluous featuring. Everyone else has covered these in other reviews, so no need to rehash the well known here.

All griping aside. The graphics are beautiful. The tracks are well rendered. The overall effects and feel of the game are beautiful. But as far as a driving experience and something fun to play... it just doesn't hold any allure in any way for me. Really a true disappointment on many levels from a franchise that I had always heard to be the best out there. There are already much better other racing games out there on the PS3 that I feel have given a lot better game play experience as well and while their physics engines aren't anything great either, at least they don't try to claim "simulation" and get at least a few things down better than GT5 even does even if they are less complete packages for the physics.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing teaser for the full version, but not w/o its issues, June 13, 2009
By 
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
As others have said, it's a gorgeous looking game. The HD graphics are as sweet as it comes, and the look makes the virtual driving experience quite seductive. In addition the game's physics modeling feels good and convincing, particularly with the Logitech Driving Force GT wheel designed specifically for Gran Turismo 5. For a 'prologue' title there's a fairly nice array of vehicles for the gamer to sample and drive. On the surface there's a lot to like about GT5P.

That said, as a prologue sampler it's not surprising that it's not at all perfect...not by a long shot. You start with a tidy sum of credits to buy a car to start racing with. There are three base skill tiers made up of ten races each where each race is considered successfully completed when the gamer has achieved a podium finish (1st, 2nd or 3rd place). Credit awards are earned based on race results, and are to be used to purchase additional cars as needed for subsequent specific races, or just for the heck of it because you just want to try them. Once the ten races of a tier are successfully completed the next tier above is unlocked and its races are available for the gamer to run. Once all of the three lower tiers are completed, a special bonus tier is unlocked. All fairly basic in principle and execution.

There are only six venues to run on, and all are tarmac courses; in reality it seems a bit shorted even at the original $40 retail price. While each circuit provides two configuration variations, it's hardly anything compelling to be considered diverse and enticing enough for repeated game play while waiting for the full version of GT5 to arrive. The AI of the computer-controlled cars is disappointingly predictable and rather monotonous, further degrading gameplay. As with past GT titles, accident damage is not present for any amount of contact; instead, for the early and easiest rounds you can drive rather maniacally and get away with it. After one has firmly developed some rather nasty driving habits, the developers toss in a curve for the final 'bonus' tier races, relying on using a rather unsatisfactory system of penalty time that's assessed immediately after the act of infraction by the game player, though conversely not applied to the computer-controlled opponents, which at least initially makes for considerable frustration (at the perceived "unfairness" of it all).

But this frustration eventually passes; even the penalty assessments become oh-so-predictable; it's easy to figure out just how much contact, rough driving or cutting corner apexes I can get away with without invoking a penalty, and actually use this to my advantage. There are even times where it's actually less costly (in terms of gaining track position) to roughhouse it and take a penalty through a section of a race course than to properly slow down and drive through at the rear of the procession of cars. Again, it's not a very satisfactory solution, nor is it very realistic. Evidently it seems, in their real-life research the game's developers--Polyphony Digital--never watched a Porsche SuperCup race (then again, there are no Porsches in GT5P, either)...where there the real-life racing takes the meaning of "incidental contact" to a whole new level of appreciation (and battle damage).

For all of its self-insinuation that GT5P is more simulation than game, despite all 'official' disclaimers to the contrary, this title is still very much a 'game' in its construct and execution. From the single-file flying starts to the too-short race lengths to the too-small field sizes (for any given track) to the fact that it's even easy to successfully score a podium finish with the PS3's basic handheld controller, each 'race' feels more like a training exercise to be mastered than a convincing, realistic car racing event. And it's here where at least for me I have to wonder at just how good the full game will honestly be when it finally arrives.

But at least it'll sure looks pretty...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Looks good. Plays bad., July 11, 2008
By 
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
I agree with the review about the horrible AI and no car damage. To add to that, here are 3 more problems I had with this game.

1. Game progression. This game operates on a credit system where you have to win prize money in races to buy better cars. This is coupled with race events that are very particular about cars that you are allowed to use. There are races where all cars are permitted, but a good portion where you don't have any of the cars permitted. This means that you will end up racing the all-car events over and over again to get enough money to buy the cars to get into the specific-car events. Furthermore, race events are grouped into 3 classes depending on difficulty. The problem is that since you can't move into the next class without completing ALL races in the current class, you're further stuck in reracing certain events to buy the cars you need to race for EACH and EVERY event in a class before moving on. Kinda fascist if you think about it. Same thing for online racing. After playing for a night, I was still not able to compete online because I didn't own any of the cars allowed in any of the races. Frustrating to the nth degree.

2. This is more an extension of the no-damage complaint. When you drive by and hit a car, it sort of just slides around you. There are no spinouts or pileups. Feels like those old arcade racers on the Atari. They just go back on their predetermined track. That means winning a race consists of avoiding contact to maintain the highest top speed.

3. Perhaps the biggest problem: the cars just don't feel like they're going fast. Maybe it has to do with the graphics, the sound effects, or the handling. It pisses you off when your car overshoots a curve and spins out in the sand when it feels like you're not going that fast (despite what the speedometer tells you).

This effort just shows me that the designers were not of the right mindset when this game was made. Graphics and realism over gameplay and fun. One of the ugliest deaths for any well-intended game.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A passionate labor of love to give us the drive of our life., April 24, 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
Wow. Trying to give Gran Turismo 5: Prologue a complete review is like trying to count the grains of sand on the beach in Ashikita, but I'll do my best.

Whether you are a new player of Gran Turismo or a long-time fan like myself, the only place to truly start is choosing the Gran Turismo TV option and watch the video "Beyond The Apex". I watched this video at least 4 times before I even started playing the game.

We get to meet Kazunori Yamauchi, Gran Turismo's creator. This man loved cars by age 8, and his love has developed into a lifelong dream of providing video gamers the perfect balance between car beauty, and car functionality.

But this is no easy task - for example, his development team took great pains to take 20-30,000 pictures of just ONE racetrack over a 2 month timeframe! Why? To make us feel like we're racing on the real thing.

Every curve in the road, every tire mark on the track, every dip of the car frame with acceleration and shifting is designed to give us all the sensations we would feel driving a car in the real world.

The game gets glowing reviews from Tanner Foust, a professional drifter and Rally car driver. It's one thing for a person like me who's never been on a racetrack, it's quite another when a professional driver says this is the type of game that encourages people to go out and buy a rear wheel drive car and try it for real!

Okay, so let's get on to the gameplay.

The online PS3 players can use the functions of News, Online Racing, and Online Rankings. The only thing sweeter than hosting a race with players from across the globe and winning a three lap race by a hair's breath, is seeing YOUR name at the top of the online rankings.

There are 71 cars to choose from, more than enough to whet our appetites until the full version of Gran Turismo 5 is released. This game gives us a lot of creative freedom: we can alter the AI difficulty, the active steering, the driving physics, braking, traction control, tires, and much more.

The graphics are, for lack of a better word, flawless. During the intro movie, a car is shown driving on a road with sunlight reflecting off the rear panels - the light is shown as patchwork through leaves on a passing tree. That level of detail is also in the gameplay itself.

There are 4 different viewpoints for driving the car: a player with the top-of-the-line racing wheel can choose three camera angles inside the car, while other players can choose the exterior camera to get a better overall view of the car's physics. As far as the controller options, we can choose the button setup ourselves. I was very impressed to see the controller schematic for not just one, but FIVE driving wheel simulators to choose from.

On the racetrack, we have a blue line to direct us on the best path to victory, which we can either follow or alter at our own risk. The path also shows us the optimal brake times, which is a fantastic feature for the novice and expert alike. We have rules to follow - The days of cutting across patches of sand to get ahead of our opponents are gone. There are penalties for hitting other cars, ramming cars off the track, using shortcuts and any boundary collisions.

So what are the shortcomings?

Well, the online portion does have limits. If the host player of a race has a slower internet connection, the race can end prematurely or the picture quality/gameplay is sacrified. Some players are extremely courteous, other players may resort to cheap schoolyard tactics which can ruin the overall racing experience.

The AI can be a little cruel on the racing circuit. We can't hit other cars, but if we're in the line of another car that drifts into us, we get penalized.

The emphasis on drifting is more prevalent in this iteration of Gran Turismo, and the art of drifting is not easy to master. The more casual player might find this aspect of racing very frustrating.

Younger gamers might get frustrated with the realism of the game's physics....this isn't Twisted Metal, after all. But hey, if Kazunori Yamauchi could love cars at age 8, then I guess anything is possible.

But the biggest shortcoming? This is only a prologue....the finished product will most likely not be released before 2009.

Anyone with a passionate love of cars probably has this game in their library already. The casual player can definitely give this game a rent, much as I did. Be prepared, though: Once you appreciate the fine art of drifting and racing with the precision of a heart surgeon, you won't be returning this rental on time. You'll be saving your pennies for a Dualshock Wireless Controller or a Gran Turismo Racing Wheel.

Gran Turismo has truly earned the title of "The Real Driving Simulator".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exactly What Anyone Intelligent Should Expect, June 12, 2008
By 
elixxxer (Bay Area, CA) - See all my reviews
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
Please ignore the reviews touting this as an incomplete game. They were clearly expecting something other than what the title promised, a Prologue. If you are a serious Gran Turismo or car enthusiast like myself and own a PS3, you are doing yourself a great disservice by not purchasing this game. The graphics are astounding, there is a healthy choice of cars (70+) and online play works very well. In fall, crash damage and enhanced online gameplay will be added via online update, so Polyphony is not leaving this game alone until the full release of Gran Turismo 5.

While the game still feels like GT of old, the new in-cockpit view adds genuine realism and excitement to the gameplay. Also ignore others here as they assert that the driving dynamics are the same as all previous GT games: this is blatantly fallacious. In "professional" physics mode, handling characteristics are far more realistic than ever before. You can genuinely feel body roll, push (understeer), mid-corner rotation and squats and dives from acceleration/deceleration. Each car feels immensely different and astonishingly organic.

Again, if you have been a fan of the GT series, do not wait until the full game arrives and pick this one up immediately. If you never liked GT, big surprise, you won't like this iteration either. Also, all of your progress (bought/won cars, money, etc.) will be carried over to the full game as well. Anyone expecting more than a "prologue" had their expectations set too high. Yes, the full game will obviously be more comprehensive, but with promised online updates and by far the best driving dynamics ever created for a racing game, Gran Turismo Prologue is easily worth $40.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Worst. Entry. Ever., January 9, 2009
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Gran Turismo 5 Prologue (Video Game)
Perhaps I have let my expectations get the best of me, but this is a sore disappointment -- and I've owed and played every GT. This game sucks horribly for the price, and would be only a moderate improvement at half that.

The familiar licencing structure was tossed out the window, which immediately confused me; and the pre-ordered (and seriously short) single player 'path' is notoriously narrow-minded. One of the great things about GT is the multiple ways you can play through to your liking -- well, not anymore!

As already noted in other reviews, the AI sucks. But the inability to customize the cars is horrible. They obviously rebalanced the cup winnings so that you can earn new cars faster, but that still doesn't fix my need to customize my cars (some of my favorite cars in GT have been the first couple of seriously tricked out rides).

The online play is lacking a lot of thought, but I can only assume they wanted a test of concept before building in any serious infrastructure. Still, at [...]? Give me some features, please.

For the price point, this game is not worth it. It plays more like a demo than real GT.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 224 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Gran Turismo 5 Prologue
Gran Turismo 5 Prologue by Sony Computer Entertainment (PlayStation 3)
$29.99 $12.23
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.