Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Deradoorian $5 Off Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Big Savings in the Amazon Fall Sportsman Event Learn more
Grand New Party and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Grand New Party: How Republicans Can Win the Working Class and Save the American Dream 1st Edition

29 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0385519434
ISBN-10: 0385519435
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$7.00
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book may contain highlighting and/or handwritten notes.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
49 Used from $0.01
More Buying Choices
19 New from $3.97 49 Used from $0.01 4 Collectible from $4.99
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


InterDesign Brand Store Awareness Rent Textbooks

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Coauthored by Atlantic Monthly writers Douthat and Salam, this book (like David Frum's Comeback) is part of a movement to reconstruct the Republican Party's core principles and reinvigorate the conservative electorate. The authors' strategy is to win back the working class through a combination of prudent government intervention and entrepreneurship. Relying on a bevy of sociological analysis, class scrutiny and historicism—a style resembling New York Times columnist David Brooks's, but stripped of his literary flair—Douthat and Salam take a nuts-and-bolts approach, perhaps because their book is prescriptive rather than observational, policy advocacy not entertainment. Whether or not readers will agree with the tenor of their arguments, rarely have moderate conservative ideas been so intelligently streamlined and so self-consciously pruned of conservatism's hairier iterations. The real holes in the text are the lack of cogent discussions on immigration and the war against radical Islam—the very issues currently shaping working-class politics in America. Nevertheless, this book is stuffed with fresh and brilliant ideas and presents a solid domestic conservative agenda to win over blue-collar workers. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“If I could put one book on the desk of every Republican officeholder, Grand New Party would be it. . . . The best single roadmap of where the party should and is likely to head.”—David Brooks, The New York Times “Any Republican politician worried about his party's eroding base and grim prospects should make a careful study of this book.”—The New Yorker“Smart and intriguing. . . . Grand New Party is brimming with ideas.”—Los Angeles Times“Thoughtful and important. . . . Mr. Douthat and Mr. Salam are pioneering tomorrow's conservatism today.”—U.S. News & World Report“A valuable guide to the problems and prospects of both the GOP and the working class.”—New York Post“An entirely original critique of how both liberals and conservatives have misdiagnosed the problems of a key American constituency.”—Commentary Magazine“Thoughtful and important-a guidebook for Republicans in distress.”—David Frum, author of Comeback: Conservatism That Can Win Again and The Right Man“If you want to read a serious, sane, secular, constructive argument about where conservatism needs to go, this is a great place to start. Few conservatives are as honest about the practical policy challenges the right faces in an increasingly pluralist and unequal society. And very few actually have something positive to offer in the face of it. I disagreed with much of this book, but I never failed to be enlightened and provoked on almost every page.”—Andrew Sullivan, author of The Conservative Soul“We hope no Republicans read Ross Douthat and Reihan Salam's new book, because if they do, they might get an idea of how to undermine the emerging Democratic majority.”—John B. Judis and Ruy Teixeira, authors of The Emerging Democratic Majority“Ross Douthat and Reihan Salam are two dazzlingly smart and blazingly original young conservatives. In Grand New Party, they give Republicans-and all Americans interested in mending broken families and giving everyone a fair chance-some excellent advice, not just about political strategy but also on public policy.”—Michael Barone, senior writer, U.S. News & World Report, resident fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and coauthor of The Almanac of American PoliticsGrand New Party fills a cavernous void of new thinking on the center-right, and it does so with intelligence, depth, and even some compassion. Ross Douthat and Reihan Salam are brilliant, ceaselessly interesting thinkers. I often disagree with them, but their case is sharp and well-stated, and in its general outlines offers the only path to remake the Republican Party into something decent. They have performed a truly valuable service for Republicans and non-Republicans alike.”—Jonathan Chait, senior editor, The New Republic, and author of The Big Con“Ross Douthat and Reihan Salam offer a wholly original look at American politics. Republicans have failed to become the country's majority party because they have forgotten the working class, and Grand New Party outlines an innovative agenda that could revitalize the GOP—and the country.”—Ramesh Ponnuru, senior editor, National Review --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1 edition (June 24, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385519435
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385519434
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #863,586 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Related Media


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Michael T Kennedy VINE VOICE on July 2, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This small book does an excellent job of summarizing the political history of the Republican Party the past 60 years or so. It offers a critique of where it went, if not wrong, at least out of focus the past eight years. It is a companion to David Frum's book, "Comeback," and the authors refer to Frum's ideas frequently although he is not credited at the end. Some of their ideas I agree with, some I don't know enough about to criticize and I disagree with their health care chapter although I agree on its importance. The emphasis is on the appeal of the Republican Party to the "Sam's Club voter," a term they claim to have originated and which has been used by Governor Pawlenty of Minnesota. It is a very useful concept and the heart of this book. Their argument is that the family is a crucial institution for the lower income and less educated American. They discuss how the family, as an institution, has been badly damaged in the past 40 years and they offer suggestions on how to undo some of the damage.

The first three chapters are probably the best and summarize the history of attempted Republican reforms that would attract the working class voter to form a new coalition after the Roosevelt New Deal coalition broke up in the 1960s. They point out that, after 30 years of steady progress, wages for working class people stagnated beginning about 1973. They say little about the high inflation of the Carter years but I remember it well and think it deserves more emphasis because of its terrible effect on affordability of home ownership.

They point out, as does David Frum, that the high crime, high inflation and stagnant economy of the 70s were all mostly solved during the Reagan era and, following that, the working class had less affinity for the Republican party of George Bush.
Read more ›
13 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 32 people found the following review helpful By S. Ross on July 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I'm center-left politically, reasonably well informed but not involved in politics. The bulk of this book is a concise but incredibly insightful political history from the New Deal forward that I couldn't put down. I read plenty of political magazines and blogs, yet on every page I would think, Yes-that makes sense! Why hadn't I thought of it that way before? I loved it so much that I bought copies of the book for four members of my family (who are mostly center-right to Rush Limbaugh right).

The authors do a great job of describing the enduring appeal of the New Deal in the mid 20th century, emphasizing that it was not only egalitarian but moralistic, then describing the trends that fractured the coalition in the the mid 60s and early 70s. I found their political history to be rich, sharp, subtle, and without precedent. I'm amazed that they could be so sensitive to the motivations and excesses of both the left and the right, yet write with such verve. It's critical but evenhanded, intellectual in the best sense, never dry or academic.

In a world that seems to be a left-right Punch and Judy, an echo chamber of ideologues and bashers, this book provides a space for real dialogue. I'm no fan of GWB, but this book helped me better appreciate his intial intentions (if not his god-awful execution). It also paints a much more convincing picture of the roots of social conservatism in the working class than Thomas Franks' "What's the Matter with Kansas," which makes them look like rubes.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Karl Wolff on August 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
The United States has a lot of problems. On occasion, someone might have a bright idea on how to solve those problems. This book, asserting it can fix all America's problems, the GOP needs to offer an agenda that would help a pan-ethnic working class.

Unfortunately, it seems that the people most in need of reading this book have not done so. Arizona attempted to solve its immigration problem in the most nativist way possible, alienating the emergent Latin American cohort. Republicans in Congress are defending the ecocidal terrorism and corporate incompetence of British Petroleum, meanwhile blaming regulation as the culprit. (As if the United States political system has had no relationship with Big Oil.) Meanwhile the Family Values ethos wanes amidst the sexual hypocrisy of George Rekers, Ted Haggard, Mark Foley and Michael Steele. Clearly, the GOP is in need of some serious ideological triage. Then again, when the car's totaled, you aren't going to waste your time debating trim color.

The book is a concise history of modern conservatism's failures and both tactical and strategic solutions to those failures. The title suggests the solutions lie with the working class (read: non-college--educated), who are given the pithy label "Sam's Club voters." This is classic conservative damage control, offering a plain-spoken wake-up call to those fed up with government bureaucracy, corporate malfeasance and moral decline. The solutions all seem to stem from a libertarian ethos. Self-reliance is a term that gets bandied about a lot, positing a frontier mythos, with a lot of macho posturing thrown in.
Douthat and Salam stand out from other conservative voices in their defense of the New Deal and in reassessing the Reagan Revolution in a more rational light.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?