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Grand Theft Pentagon: Tales of Corruption and Profiteering in the War on Terror Library Binding – July 1, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-1567513370 ISBN-10: 1567513379

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Product Details

  • Library Binding: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Common Courage Press (July 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1567513379
  • ISBN-13: 978-1567513370
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,667,554 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jeffrey St. Clair is an award-winning investigative journalist, co-editor of political newsletter CounterPunch and author of nine books, including Whiteout: the CIA, Drugs and the Press, Been Brown So Long It Looked Like Green to Me: the Politics of Nature and Imperial Crusades: Iraq, Afghanistan and Yugoslavia.

More About the Author

Jeffrey St. Clair (born 1959 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an investigative journalist, writer and editor. He is the co-editor, with Alexander Cockburn, of the political newsletter CounterPunch, and a contributing editor to the monthly magazine In These Times. He has also written for The Washington Post, San Francisco Examiner, The Nation and The Progressive. His reporting specializes in the politics surrounding environmental and military issues.

St. Clair attended the American University in Washington, D.C., majoring in English and history. He has worked as an environmental organizer and writer for Friends of the Earth, Clean Water Action Project and the Hoosier Environmental Council.

In 1990, he moved to Oregon to edit the influential environmental magazine Forest Watch, published by the libertarian economist Randal O'Toole. In 1994, he joined journalists Alexander Cockburn and Ken Silverstein on CounterPunch. He now co-edits the newsletter and the popular website.

In 1998, he published his first book, with Cockburn, Whiteout: the CIA, Drugs and the Press, a history of the CIA's ties to drug gangs from World War II to the Mujahideen and Nicaraguan Contras. This was followed by A Field Guide to Environmental Bad Guys (with James Ridgeway), Five Days that Shook the World: Seattle and Beyond, Al Gore: a User's Manual, Been Brown So Long It Looked Like Green to Me: the Politics of Nature, Grand Theft Pentagon and Born Under a Bad Sky.

Jeffrey St. Clair lives in Oregon City with his wife Kimberly Willson, a librarian, and his two children Zen and Nathaniel St. Clair.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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This is a book all Americans should read but will not.
R. Neva
He also shows how, from the very beginning, the Bush administration set its eyes on Iraq, despite the fact that it had no connection to 9/11.
John Walsh
What makes St.Clair's work so compelling, and so likely to endure, is his focus on people, the villains and the very few heroes of the piece.
R. Michael Neumann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 62 people found the following review helpful By R. Jacobs on February 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
Once upon a time in America, there was a form of newspaper reporting known as muckraking. Some folks preferred to call this form of reporting "investigative reporting." No matter. Whatever it was called, the purpose of the reporting, the reporters, and the papers that ran the articles was to expose corruption, graft and just plain old evil in the echelons of government and big business. Of course, there was also a hope that this exposure would end the reported abuses or, at the least, get rid of the worst abusers and most corrupt men involved. Magazines in the first wave of muckraking included McClure's, Colliers, and Everybody's and some of the better known writers were Upton Sinclair, Lincoln Steffens, and Ida Tarbell.

Over the years this type of reporting has become harder to find. Many of the magazines and journals that used to run the often long articles that investigative reporting requires fell victim to the machinations of monopoly capitalism. Of course, this was fine with the capitalists, who were often the targets of the muckrakers. Other magazines and newspapers became the victim of the news media's shift to broadcast journalism. Except for the occasional series on city crime or local graft, these papers and magazines are mere shadows of their earlier selves.

Fortunately, there is Counterpunch. Like a select few of its counterparts on the right and the left, this paper expands the limits of journalism, running investigative reports, commentary, announcements and cultural criticism both online and in a paper version. Edited by Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair, this journal often reminds me of Ramparts in its glory days.
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47 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Michael Donnelly on March 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
I sent a copy of Grand Theft Pentagon to a Pentagon Contracts Officer I know. He read it and his take was: "Next time, have St. Clair call me. He only scratched the surface. It's far more complicated and more corrupt than even he knows."

And, St. Clair knows plenty. This book is an informative and witty take on the many scams that go along with the constant war munitions industry and the symbiotic relationship between CEOs and the Brass.

One could fund all edcuation in America with just the money spent on some of completely useless systems unearthed here. When one considers the perpetual overcharging and outright graft, Universal Health Care can be added.
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61 of 69 people found the following review helpful By John Walsh on January 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
I post this wonderful review by Ashley Smith. My sentiments exactly.

--

Pigs Feeding on the Trough of War

Jeffrey St. Clair, Grand Theft Pentagon: How War Contractors Rip Off America and Threaten the World. Common Courage Press, 2005, 336 pages, $18.95.

The Bush administration's reign of error and terror has left a pile of corruption, waste and destruction that rivals the muck of the Augean stable. Jeffrey St. Clair's new book, Grand Theft Pentagon, accomplishes the Herculean task of exposing these abuses with brilliant investigative journalism carried off with unmatched sarcasm.

After the Cold War, the military industrial complex was desperate for a new conflict to legitimize profligate spending on war, weapons systems and their associated services. St. Clair chronicles how Bush's so-called "war on terror" has enabled our rulers to rekindle the incestuous relationship between politicians, the Pentagon and military contractors.

The marriage counselor of this foul union is none other than George Bush himself.

In perhaps the funniest exposé of the Bushes yet written, St. Clair tells the story of this company masquerading as a family. The portrait is not very flattering, politically or personally. Demonstrating their congenital penchant for putting profit before all else, the dynasty's founder, Prescott Bush, barely escaped charges of treason for wheeling and dealing with the Nazis during the Second World War.

The unlikely hero of this family saga is "W." St. Clair shows how he spent his youth boozing, snorting coke, womanizing, failing classes, securing draft deferments, dodging national guard duty, and starting and wrecking corporations for which other people paid the price.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By R. Michael Neumann on January 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
St.Clair is a muckracker par excellence. Muckracking tends to date quickly; old scandals are no longer scandalous. What makes St.Clair's work so compelling, and so likely to endure, is his focus on people, the villains and the very few heroes of the piece.

St.Clair does not caricature; he feels his subjects like a novelist. George Bush and Donald Rumsfeld come alive in all their creepiness, but when the curtain falls it is Bunnatine Greenhouse, the unsung Halliburton whistleblower, who gets center stage. St.Clair brings ample research and devastating argument to his attack on indecent powerbrokers. In the end, though, it is his humanity that illuminates the tale.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By BrickBurner on February 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
Grand Theft Pentagon takes you behind the curtains of Washington's power plays, exposing all the sweetheart deals and gaudy sleaze that exploit taxpayers and promote warfare. The lead characters in Jeffrey St. Clair's latest exposé, from Duke Cunningham to GW Bush, come to life in rich and bitter detail -- revealing not only their banality, but also their quest for global dominance.

The turn style nature of DC politics fattens the bank accounts of many. Indeed, there are reasons why we are in a state of perpetual war -- for those who profit most are in positions of power.

This should be required reading for anyone who is concerned with the state of this planet and the wars that are driving its demise. Grand Theft Pentagon spares nobody who is culpable.
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