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Grants Pass Paperback – August 22, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Morrigan Books (August 22, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9197760560
  • ISBN-13: 978-9197760560
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,216,177 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

I've been a fan of the post-apocalyptic genre since I was twelve or so.
H. Johnson
I was hoping for a few more stories that actually ended up (or even took place) in Grants Pass and though I didn't get that I wasn't at all disappointed with the book.
M. Ford
A stellar group of authors tasked with getting their characters to Grants Pass.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JEA on December 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed the stories in Grants Pass. There were maybe only two or three that I didn't care for, either due to the writing style or just the fact that the authors didn't seem that experienced/professional. But overall, I really enjoyed the book as a whole and liked how all of the stories were linked together by a common thread. Living in Oregon, only about 2 hours from Grants Pass may make me a little biased, as there was that added connection to the stories. But even with that aside, I enjoyed this anthology much more than most of the others that I've read in this genre. Recommended!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By H. Johnson VINE VOICE on November 1, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've been a fan of the post-apocalyptic genre since I was twelve or so. Heck, I saw "Omega Man" thirteen times as a young lad. I'm still a fan, and that sometimes prompts my wife to roll her eyes and comment that my persistent fondness for the genre is "a sure sign of a sick mind." But really, she's nice to me most of the time. Really.

I hovered between giving this anthology four or five stars. I leaned toward four because I wanted to avoid the appearance of being a suck-up kind of reviewer. But, I had to go with five stars, because, dang it, I loved this book. I'm not sucking up, but if the publisher would like to send me a paper copy of the book (I read it on Kindle), signed by the editors and authors, that would be cool. Har.

It's obvious that this book wasn't just another thrown together anthology. No, this collection of works was a project, and a well-written, well-edited project at that. The overlying theme--that Grants Pass, Oregon could serve as a gathering place and refuge for survivors of the end of the world--is threaded deftly through all of the stories.

I love good anthologies, and I tip my hat to the folks behind the creation of "Grants Pass."
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Stout TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 22, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Grants Pass" ended up being a different book than I expected but that's not a bad thing. I bought the book because I live fairly close to the actual Grants Pass and I enjoy P-A genre books. I expected your normal post-apocalyptic tales and I actually got much more.

The nineteen(including prologue and epilogue) stories gathered in this collection are about the overall idea of Grants Pass - a supposedly safe place to head if disaster strikes the country or the world, and of finding your own safe place, no matter where you might live. So there are stories that take place all over the world - very well-written stories at that, linked by this idea of Grants Pass, Oregon.

This isn't a survival manual but more of a treatise on the idea of safety and our humanity.

If I had to pick my favorite stories, they would be "Animal Husbandry" by Seanan McGuire aka Mira Grant and "Black Heart, White Mourning" by Jay Lake but I actually liked all the stories - not something that normally happens for me.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amber Clark on February 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
Grants Pass was not what I was expecting. It was far better! I suppose I should offer a quick disclaimer. I have been a cheerleader of this project since the beginning when Jenn and I would take our lunch time walks when we used to work together. So I had been anxious to get my hands on this book for a long time when I finally had my own copy.

Personally, I am a slow reader, so if a book doesn't hold my interest, I'm not about to invest any more of my time with it. With that said, you might be wondering how Grants Pass faired? Swimmingly! There was only one story that I didn't really care for in terms of style and storytelling, "Black Heart, White Mourning" by Jay Lake, but the story did make me think and that's a good thing. Three of the stories actually made me cry.

The first of those was "Animal Husbrandy" by Seanan McGuire, the author of Rosemary and Rue, which hit me really hard, both when Seannan read it aloud at Soul Food Books and when I read it again on my own. As a parent, I connected with one of the character and the choices he has to make for the betterment of his child.

"Newfound Gap", by Lee Clark Zumpe, had me with hope, that desperate kind which pushes people forward. Sometimes that drive pays off and sometimes it doesn't. My need for Kleenex was based out of one of those two ends. I'll let you read the story and find out which.

Lastly, "Remembrance", by James M. Sullivan, sets us up with hope again, like several of the other stories. Like "Newfound Gap", the hope pivots around reconnecting with a separated loved one and doing whatever one can to survive.

If you like apocalyptic fiction with good character development and well told stories, I can't recommend this book enough.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By P. Canniff on November 3, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I came to this lured by the topic and by the presence of at least one writer I enjoy. Alas, what I got was a really weak collection of unrelated short stories which seem to be far below the A game for the authors that I know. If this had been done as a benefit or a summer workshop project or a challenge among friends it would be pretty nice.

The constraint of a vague shared universe manages to strip away any thrill of exploring the mechanisms of the apocalypse itself, reducing it to convention and not a plot point or focus. That's a shame for some of the readers (like me) who enjoy that aspect. Unfortunately it doesn't make up for that with any sense of unity. The stories feel very disjoint, which makes the odd bookend bits even more awkward.

Some of the writers clearly made an attempt to represent a different point of view of the post-apocalyptic situation. Again this feels more like workshop output, and none rise to the level of being worthy of inclusion in a collection. They are sketches, probably flawed ones, not finished worse.

Give it a pass. Most of the authored have done far better work.
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