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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does what it sets out to do...
The emphasis is on the ships,not on the actions, or on the politics of the time. In this regard the author does a fine job of explaining the differences found in the freshwater vessels from their ocean-going counterparts. Illustrations are excellent, images chosen to illustrate various points are very good, and the narrative flows well. This is a good read and an...
Published 16 months ago by Weesel

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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Carelessly Edited
I was looking forward to reading this book because there is so little good information to be found on the subject of Great Lakes warships during the War of 1812. On the plus side it's compact and colorful and it does provide some good information in the narrative. However, the author adds very little that can be considered reliable to the existing body of knowledge. The...
Published 13 months ago by Jack Drownd


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does what it sets out to do..., June 8, 2013
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This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
The emphasis is on the ships,not on the actions, or on the politics of the time. In this regard the author does a fine job of explaining the differences found in the freshwater vessels from their ocean-going counterparts. Illustrations are excellent, images chosen to illustrate various points are very good, and the narrative flows well. This is a good read and an excellent reference for anyone wanting to understand the naval war in the north.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful pictures of these little-remembered vessels., May 23, 2013
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This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
This little book features almost everything which is known about these curiously important warships whose existence was crucial to defining the boarders between two great nations.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars GREAT LAKES WARSHIPS, 1812-1815, April 13, 2012
This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
GREAT LAKES WARSHIPS, 1812-1815
MARK LARDIS
OSPREY PUBLISHING, 2012
QUALITY SOFTCOVER, $17.95, 48 PAGES, PHOTOGRAPHS, MAPS, DIAGRAMS, DRAWINGS, CHARTS

When Britain, was fighting France in the Napoleonic Wars, neither side respected the rights of neutral merchant ships, and many U.S. vessels were seized. The British went further and impressed American sailors into their navy. They also stirred up the Native Americans in the old Northwest Territory to attack American outposts and settlements. War Hawks in the West and South united under the slogan "Free trade and sailors' rights", and Congress voted narrowly to declare war on Britain. Key to the U.S. strategy was maintaining an American naval presence on the Great Lakes to invade British Canada from Fort Detroit and from Buffalo, New York. They would have to prevent their supply lines from being cut by British vessels while the British and Canadian strategy maintained their naval superiority on Lakes Ontario, Erie, and Champlain.

GREAT LAKES WARSHIPS, 1812-1815 does an excellant job of illustrating the interaction of the land and naval arms and also the mpact of events elsewhere such as on the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. Detailed diagrams, charts, and drawings of the types of ships used by British Canada and the United States is useful in understanding the different strategies employed at the different stages of the war. Published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, this book is a timely and well written account on a often overlooked and rarely studied conflict. With that being said, there were a number of mistakes in this book and they are listed below:

*Page 8-The USS Niagara was launched in June, 1813 not May, 1813.

*Page 16-The HMS Goshawk was an 18-gun brig sloop launched in 1814 but she was later found to be unsuitable and was sold in 1815.

*Page 22-Barclay, when he arrived in the first week of June, 1813, brought one lieutenant and nineteen rejected seamen not a handful of officers and two dozen Royal Navy sailors.

*Page 23-By the time the HMS Detroit was ready, Barclay had only 50 Royal Navy officers and men and was forced to fill out his crews with 85 Canadians and 210 soldiers of the Newfoundland and 41st Regiments.

*Page 23-The correct version in regard to the USS Lawrence was that the USS Lawrence had struck its colors and the HMS Detroit ceased firing. Her one boat had been cut to pieces and therefore coudn't take control of the USS Lawrence. So as soon as the USS Niagara had advanced toward the HMS Detroit, the USS Lawrence re-hoisted her colors.

*Page 23-At the Battle of Lake Erie, the British naval force consisted of the following: 6 warships with a total displacement of 1,460 tons with 61 guns and 450 men while the U.S. naval force consisted of the following: 9 warships with a total displacement of 1,657 tons with 54 guns and 540 men.

*Page 27-The British fleet consisted of the following: 16 warships with a total displacement of 2,402 tons with 83 guns and 937 men while the U.S. fleet consisted of the following: 14 warships with a total displacement of 2,264 tons with 73 guns and 882 men.

*Page 27-The data on the HMS Duke of Gloucester should be corrected to read: It was a brig and it was the sister ship of the HMS Sir Isaac Brock and it was sold in 1815.

*Page 27-The data on the HMS Royal George should be corrected to read: It drew 10 feet 10 inches forward with 13 feet 11 inches aft. The builder was John Dennis not William Bell and its armament in 1813 was 18x32-pound carronades and 2x9-pound long guns.

*Page 27-The HMS Prince Regent should be corrected to read: The draft was 16 feet forward and 17 feet aft.

*Page 32-The data on the HMS Sir George Prevost should read: It was a freshwater sloop with a draft of 12 feet 4 inches aft and 9 feet 10 inches forward. In 1813, its armament consisted of 8x18-pound long guns and in 1814, its armament consisted of 18x32-pound carronades. As a transport, she was armed with only six guns before she was finally sold in 1831.

*Page 32-The data on the HMS Lord Melville should read: It was a schooner and its draft was 8 feet 6 inches forward and 9 feet 9 inches aft.

*Page 32-The data on the HMS Princess Charlotte should read: Its draft was 14 feet 4 inches forward and 16 feet and 4 inches aft. Its armament consisted of 24x24-pounders, 2x68-pound carronades, and 16x32-pound carronades.

*Page 32-The data on the HMS St. Lawrence should read: Its draft should read 20 feet aft and 19 feet forward. It was sold at auction in late 1831 not 1832 and the plan was that this ship was to be more powerful than Admiral Nelson's flagship HMS Victory.

*Page 32-The data on the HMS Psyche should read: Its draft was 8 feet 10 inches forward and 9 feet 8 inches aft.

*Page 32-The data on the HMS Sir Sydney Smith should read: It was launched in 1793 not 1808 and carried a crew of 109 not 70.

*Page 34-The data on the USS Madison should read: It was also classed as a corvette and it carried a crew of 274 men not 200 men.

*Page 34-The data on the USS Lady of the Lake should read: It was sold off at public auction on 2 February 1826.

*Page 34-The data on the USS Sylph should read: It was also classed as a brig and weighed 340 tons not 300 tons.

*Page 35-The data on the USS General Pike should read: It weighed 900 tons not 875 tons and had a crew of 432 not 300.

*Page 35-The data on the USS Jones should read: That it was sold in 1821 not 1825.

*Page 35-The data on the USS Superior should read: That it was sold and broken up in 1824 not 1825.

*Page 36-The data on the USS Fair American should read: It had a crew of 63 not 52.

*Page 36-The data on the USS Asp should read: It had a crew of 27 not 45.

*Page 36-The data on the USS Growler should read: It had a crew of 31 not 35 and it weighed 53 tons not 81 tons.

*Page 38-The data on the HMS Hamilton should read: It sank in a squall on August 8, 1813.

*Page 38-The data on the HMS Ontario should read: It had a crew of 29 not 35.

*Page 38-The data on the HMS Conquest should read: It had a crew of 66 not 40.

*Page 38-The data on the HMS Scourge should read: It had a crew of 33 not 66.

*Page 39-The data on the HMS General Hunter should read: It had a crew of 30 men not 45.

*Page 39-The data on the HMS Queen Charlotte should read: It had a crew of only 75 men not 126.

*Page 39-The data on the HMS Lady Prevost should read: It had a crew of 43 men not 86 and it was classed as a brig.

*Page 39-The data on the HMS Detroit should read: It was classed as a corvette and its armament consisted of 19 guns of four different calibers taken from Fort Malden.

*Page 39-The data on the HMS Little Belt should read: It was launched in 1811 not 1810 and it was 59 feet on deck by 16 feet by 7 feet and weighed 100 tons.

*Page 40-The data on the USS Oneida should read: It had a crew of 146 men not 150.

*Page 42-The data on the HMS Adams should read: It was burnt by U.S. forces upon the re-capture of Detroit from the British on 9 October 1812.

*Page 42-The data on the USS Porcupine should read: It was constructed by Adam and Noah Brown not Daniel Dobbins.

*Page 42-The data on the USS Tigress should read: It was constructed by Adam and Noah Brown not Daniel Dobbins.

*Page 42-The data on the USS Scorpion should read: It weighed 63 tons not 663 tons.

*Page 43-The data on the USS Somers should read: It was 53 feet 6 inches and 41 feet 37 5/8 inches by 17 feet 3 1/2 inches by 8 feet.

*Page 43-The data on the USS Ohio should read: It was 59 feet and 45 feet 10 5/8 inches by 18 feet 11 inches by 7 feet 2 inches.

*Page 43-The data on the USS Linnet should read: It had a crew of 99 not 125 and its armament consisted of 16x24-pound long guns not 16x12-pound long guns.

*Page 43-The data on the USS Confiance should read: It had a crew of 270 not 325 and it was 147 feet 5 inches not 47 feet 5 inches.

*Page 44-The data on the USS Ticonderoga should read: It had a crew of 250 not 212 and it was launched in April, 1813 not 1814. It weighed 350 tons not 375 tons.

*Page 44-The data on the USS Saratoga should read: Its draft was 14 feet 6 inchs not 12 feet 6 inches.

*Page 44-The data on the USS Eagle should read: It weighed 550 tons not 500 tons. It was classed as a sloop and had a crew of 41 not 50.

*Page 45-The data on the USS Preble should read: It had a crew of 45 not 50 and its armament consisted of 9x9-pound long guns not 2x18-pound carronades and 7x12-pound long guns.

*Page 45-The data on the HMS Wasp should read: Its armament consisted of 3x12-pound long guns not 2x12-pound guns. These guns were later transfered to the USS Ticonderoga.

*Page 45-The data on the USS Montgomery should read: Its armament consisted of 7x9-pound long guns and 2x18-pound columbiads not 2x18-pound columbiads and 9 x9 pound long guns.

Lt. Colonel Robert A. Lynn, Florida Guard
Orlando, Florida
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good introduction to Great Lakes warships, May 21, 2014
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This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
This book is a good introduction to the Great Lakes naval campaigns of the War of 1812. Undoubtedly its timely publication for the bicentennial celebration has helped it in terms of interest and sales. Like all Osprey books, the page count makes it more of an introduction and salutation of the material, to assist the interested reader in further research on the subject. Nevertheless, it had a lot of good technical information on the boats & ships of both sides. There were a lot of period illustrations which might have been short of detail, but helped a lot in understanding the ships & their times in context. The color plates did not stick to the usual fiery exchange of broadsides, but contributed in understanding to the catch-as-catch-can nature of anti-shipping cruises, and the inherent danger of the Lakes themselves, where fickle weather conditions proved as dangerous as enemy cannon fire. I got this book as a present for my father, a devotee of the Age of Sail, and he liked it a great deal.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Warships on the Great Lakes..., April 11, 2014
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This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
The naval aspects of the War of 1812 included the battle for the Great Lakes between the U.S. and British Canada, as both sides scrambled to improvise fighting ships from Lake Champlain to Lake Ontario to Lake Erie. The result was a naval arms race fought from instant shipyards on both sides.

"Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815" is an Osprey New Vanguard Series entry, authored by naval architect Mark Lardas with illustrations by Paul Wright. The author sticks to the construction side of the story; battles are referenced only in passing. The text captures the adaptation of numerous commercial vessels into the armed schooners and brigs that did most of the fighting, although a few heavier purpose-built warships made an appearance late in the war. Most of the ship fittings had to be brought from the Atlantic seaboard to equip vessels often cobbled together out of any available green wood. There is an excellent recap of the fleets at the end of this short book, along with a useful glossary of terms. The text is nicely supplemented with a collection of period and modern illustrations, maps and photographs. Recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars very satisfied., October 19, 2014
This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
arrived on time. product exactly as described. very satisfied.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Carelessly Edited, September 22, 2013
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This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
I was looking forward to reading this book because there is so little good information to be found on the subject of Great Lakes warships during the War of 1812. On the plus side it's compact and colorful and it does provide some good information in the narrative. However, the author adds very little that can be considered reliable to the existing body of knowledge. The book suffers from sloppy research and/or terrible editing, and implausible illustrations. There are very few line drawings and these have no dimensions. Maps are all but nonexistent and it's hard to follow the narrative without them. There are some scattered figures for dimensions and tonnages in the somewhat incomplete lists of vessels, but many of these are illogical and only tend to exasperate rather than inform. It's hard to understand all the inconsistencies since this is a very small book - almost more of a pamphlet really. It nominally exists to present facts but actually distorts matters in more than a few instances. I would really prefer to like this little book but I honestly can't recommend it.
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1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good., May 16, 2012
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This review is from: Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) (Paperback)
The naval campaigns involving small units are often forgotten in the footnotes of history. This book, though slim, fills a gap. I was very happy with him and brought by him for more information about.
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Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard)
Great Lakes Warships 1812-1815 (New Vanguard) by Mark Lardas (Paperback - March 20, 2012)
$17.95 $11.24
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