Buy New
$14.46
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $2.49 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Great Moon Hoax Library Binding – April 1, 2011


Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
$14.46
$4.48 $0.01


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 and up
  • Grade Level: 1 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 750L (What's this?)
  • Library Binding: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Carolrhoda Books (April 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761351108
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761351108
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 11 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,741,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen Krensky did not have the kind of childhood anyone would choose to write books about. It was happy and uneventful, with only the occasional bump in the night to keep him on his toes. He started writing at Hamilton College in upstate New York where he graduated in 1975. His first book, A Big Day for Scepters, was published in 1977, and he has now written over 100 fiction and nonfiction children's books--including novels, picture books, easy readers, and biographies. Mr. Krensky and his family live in Lexington, Massachusetts.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mandy @ Living Peacefully with Children on April 10, 2011
Format: Library Binding
Stephen Krensky briefly touches on the story of The Great Moon Hoax and the lives of the newsies. With a unique pictorial style, the story itself seems to be lacking and ends abruptly without giving enough detail of the historical events. However, the book did bring up quite a few side components which my children and I discussed such as newsies, child labor, monopolies, unions, and minimum wage.

Disclaimer: A complimentary copy of the book was provided by the publisher.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lori Katz on March 7, 2011
Format: Library Binding
In 1833 the New York Sun, a new publication used newsboys to sell it's newspapers on the street. To entice people to buy their paper the headlines and stories needed to be interesting. And so in 1835 when the paper began to write about what a far away astronomer was seeing on the moon through his telescope, lots of papers were sold. Jake and Charlie are two of these boys and it's their story we hear. Homeless and without family they sell papers to feed themselves and on a big sales day spend the night in a boardinghouse. Illustrations by Josee Bisaillon depict among other creatures man-bats and moon beavers. When Jack and Charlie learn it was all a hoax they're not upset. Instead Jake thinks about writing his own stories one day. Krensky has made this historical fiction book accessible for young readers and even though the boys live in poverty, hope for them shines bright. Readers will look at the moon through new eyes. Recommended for youngsters who enjoy historical fiction or stories about the moon. Read as an ebook arc courtesy of Carolrhoda via Netgalley.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Library Binding
Two young newsboys depend on their day-to-day survival by selling newspapers. The two boys are overjoyed when the paper they sell, The Sun, begins a new series on startling discoveries on the moon. Day after day, the paper reveals new discoveries, including moon beavers, lakes of death, and serene flying creatures. Then it is learned that the stories are a hoax.

This story is based on true events and that added an air of authenticity to the piece. It was a new story to me; I liked that. The illustrations were made of paper and that was interesting.

"On Wednesday, the second article appeared. It described animals on the moon's surface. There were herds of brown quadrupeds, like small bison, but with a hairy veil that crossed `the whole breadth of the forehead and united to the ears.'"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Heidi Grange on May 21, 2011
Format: Library Binding
Jake and Charlie sell newspapers. Based on how well they do each day, they chose a place to sleep, varying from alleyways to boarding houses. Often the headlines determine how well the newspapers sell. When the paper starts printing stories about a telescope that allows the moon to be seen, the boys start doing really well. Each day the newspaper carried an article about the fantastic things that were being seen on the moon. But could Jake's and Charlie's good fortune last?

I find this book very unusual, first because of the idea that such stories were believed, and second, the strangeness of the stories being told. The illustrations are rather strange in and of themselves, which I think matches the strangeness of the stories the newspaper printed. Unfortunately, I don't think the illustrations will appeal to many children, although children's tastes can be very surprising. The strength of this book though is the idea it presents of telling lies to make money. This fits in perfectly with teaching children about media literacy and learning to question what one reads. The illustrations could very easily turn into a discussion of what illustrations are designed to do and the abstractness of art. These themes would lead me to use this book with older students, I think it might confuse younger children.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search