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51 of 51 people found the following review helpful
Probably one of the greatest works for spiritual progress, the Lam Rim Chenmo has been translated into three volumes.
This, the third volume consists of a lucid and well presented translation of the concentration and wisdom chapters.
The concentration chapter is a masterwork on developing the higher levels of meditative concentration, and being explicitly ecumenical, is relavant to anyone involved in meditation or mind training.
The wisdom chapter alone should be read and re-read by anyone who wishes have an unmistaken view.
His Holiness the Dalai Lama has been quoted as saying that this particular chapter is one of two expositions of emptiness that reveal the view.
In short, I cannot recommend this book highly enough.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2006
(Because this is volume three, please refer to my review on volume one, ISBN 1559391529, for a general introduction to this important series).

Volume three in this series - which are about the "three precious trainings", that comprise the entire Tibetan buddhist path - covers the meditation practice of the superior training of the mahayana path. Meditation training consists of meditative serenity (shamatha) and insight (vipashyana), which are the last two perfections of the six perfections (paramitas) of the mahayana path.

The explanation of meditative serenity in this book is superb, and contains very clear sentences, such as: "Mindfulness is an accurate awareness whether you are distracted [where distraction is the opposite of meditation]." "Vigilance is an accurate awareness whether you are becoming distracted." "Exertion refers to tightly focusing your mind on virtue with clear enthusiasm."

The topics of shamatha and vipashyana are explained from all angles: Why together they are both necessary and complete, what is their nature, what are the advantages of developing their qualities as well as the disadvantages of not developing them, what are the obstructions to both, as well as the antidotes to these obstructions, and so on.

In short, this volume provides an excellent explanation of the practice of meditation, not easily found elsewhere.

Having said that, the second part of this book, which covers the topic of insight (vipashyana), is much less attractive, in my opinion, because it is a very advanced and detailed exposition of Tsongh-kha-pa's view on mahamudra, and less suitable for a beginning Western student, such as myself.

Altogether I really appreciate this volume for its explanation in the first part, on meditative serenity (shamatha), and how it relates to insight (vipashyana).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 7, 2014
Purchase the three volume set and don't break them up. This three volume set translating The Lam Rim (Short-cut Path To Enlightenment) of Tsong-Kha-Pa, is a must-have in any student's library of seminal Tibetan works. I highly recommend that with this set, you purchase the three volume commentary by Venerable Geshe Lhundrub Sopa. This commentary is Geshe Sopa's life work, and is full of complete traditional expositions of Tsong-Kha-Pa's text. With both sets, and a blessing from your lama, you should have the full traditional transmission and exposition of Venerable Tsong-Kha-Pa's intent, a firm foundation for both practice and scholarship. Expensive, yes, but month by month you can get each one, and by the end of the year have a nice collection. In addition, I would like to highly recommend you purchase one small paperback: Herbert Guenther's translation of Gampo-pa's "Jewel Ornament of Liberation." This is also a lam-rim (short-cut path) style text of shorter length, and famous for its different style of organization and stories.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on June 19, 2008
Briefly, this is a great contribution to the corpus of literature from the Tibetan Buddhist tradition in English.

The Great Treatise on the Stages to the Path to Enlightenment is synonymous for many with the Gelugpa tradition as whole, and given the historical centrality of that tradition, one could well argue that it is essential for students of Tibetan Buddhism to be able to read this work in its entirety. Given the complexity and length of the work, the translators have done us all an invaluable service. I feel we who are confined to English as the language in which we study the Dharma should consider ourselves lucky to have access to this comprehensive overview of the Buddhist path, seen from the point of view of Je Tsongkapa, one the pivotal figures in the long story of Buddhism in Tibet.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 16, 2013
I believe this work, in my own life, has been critical in systematizing and organizing my practice as a Buddhist. It gives a wonderful platform to identify just what it is to be Buddhist and then to identify the trajectory of one's own practice which, in the huge pantheon of opportunity in Buddhism, has been helpful to this weak mind.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2012
The Great Treatise, written by great Tibetan master Lama Tsong Khapa in the fifteenth century, is more precious than a mountain range of solid gold because unlike material wealth which can only create temporary happiness in this lifetime, Dharma can create happiness in this lifetime and in all our future lifetimes.
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on April 18, 2015
As a practicing Mahayana Buddhist this treatise has provided the level of detail I was looking for when compared to many other titles on the path which are more generalistic in their delivery
A major addition to my library. One I can't see being very far from hand
Also, recommended to those whose interest in Buddhism is more scholarly than spiritual. A great resource tool
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 15, 2013
All three volumes are totally amazing, like chests filled with gold and diamonds of wisdom. Full of practical advice for practicing the path! This final volume provides a unique and extremely valuable guide to generating calm abiding and special insight into the nature of emptiness. The treatment of emptiness here is like a wise parent's guidance, helping us from going astray into wrong views.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 25, 2015
Very happy with the purchase and the service, thanks
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 30, 2012
This entire series is beyond words. I thoroughly enjoy it and learn more everyday. The depth of the scopes is breathtaking.
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