Greatest Hits

January 1, 2002 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:13
30
2
3:00
30
3
3:08
30
4
2:46
30
5
3:02
30
6
2:38
30
7
3:07
30
8
2:34
30
9
3:00
30
10
2:31
30
11
2:58
30
12
3:20
30
13
3:25
30
14
3:03
30
15
3:04
30
16
3:07
30
17
3:20
30
18
3:21
30
19
3:13
30
20
2:06


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 2002
  • Label: IT-WHY
  • Copyright: 2002 IT-WHY
  • Total Length: 59:56
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000S54AOY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #86,635 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

I really love all the songs and the story they tell.
Smilodon7
This has some of his best on it and is a good start for a Sinatra collection!
Kathi Gilliland
I bought it for a friend who loves his music and she is thrilled!
DSD

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Bellum on September 1, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This was one of the first CDs I ever bought, which was in 1989 while in high school. At that time, there was a dearth of Sinatra collections and I just wanted a starter CD. This is a decent collection of songs from the Reprise years, though not one I would purchase today due to the fact this material can be found on more recent, more comprehensive collections. Even though Amazon lists the original release date as 1961, I believe it was actually 1968. Many, if not all, of the songs on this collection were recorded after 1961. Note the title is "Greatest Hits," not "Best Of." These are songs that hit the pop charts and are not necessarily his best songs. Some are classic Sinatra, such as "Strangers in the Night," "Summer Wind," "It Was a Very Good Year," and "That's Life." However, there are also some you might have never heard before, such as "Somewhere in Your Heart," "Forget Domani" or "This Town." These are not bad songs, yet are certainly not indicative of his best work. The essential songs in this collection can also be found on "Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years," with one exception: "Somethin' Stupid." If it weren't for the omission of this track from "The Very Good Years," this collection would be completely obsolete. Furthermore, the twelve tracks on this disc run a total of just over thirty minutes. This might have been acceptable in 1968, but is ridiculous compared to today's standards. To add insult to injury, this CD has not been digitally mastered; as such, a slight hiss can be heard. Even though there are some very good songs here, don't bother with this CD. (At the time of this writing, this CD retails for $10.99. I certainly wouldn't pay more than $5.00 for it)
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 31, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Don't believe the title of this album unless you like falling for Barnum & Bailey hyperbole. This is NOT a Greatest Hits album. It is a compilation of Sinatra's most commercially successful material from the mid-1960s. Commercially successful this music(?) was, but good most of it is NOT. "This Town", "Tell her you love her", "Forget Domani" and "The World We Knew" are dreadful pieces of mid-60's schlock. "Summer Wind" and "It Was A Very Good Year" are the only really good recordings on this album, but you'd be better off buying the original albums from which those recordings are derived - "Strangers In The Night" and "September of My Years" respectively. Unless you're not interested in discovering truly GREAT Sinatra, stay clear of this album!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By AvidOldiesCollector TOP 100 REVIEWER on August 12, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Clearly, when compared to much of his Capitol and Columbia material, these do not count among Frank's classic songs. However, they did appeal to enough people at the time to shoot them well up the Easy Listening [Adult Contemporary] charts, and even, to a lesser degree, the Billboard Pop Hot 100. So, to dismiss them as "commercial drek" is missing the point entirely. The man had to go on paying the bills [including alimony] and so why not churn out stuff that made the greater masses happy? Did they not count?

What I don't like about this album - which first appeared in vinyl in 1968 - is the title "greatest hits" and the meagre [1 page] of liner notes. Perhaps that was all they could squeeze onto the back of an LP in 1968, but for the CD release they could have at least added more background information AND a proper discography of the contents.

As for the title, it would have been less misleading had they said "Greatest Hits At Reprise From 1964 to 1967" because that is more or less what you're getting here. In that period, working primarily with Jimmy Bowen [who once toiled with the Rhythm Orchids and Buddy Knox in the 1950s] and Sonny Burke [who had worked with Dinah Shore on many of her earlier hits], and often with the backing of Ernie Freeman, he had 16 Easy Listening/Adult Contemporary hits, 12 of which also made the Billboard Hot 100. Here you get 11 of those two-chart hits plus one that made only the AC charts [track 10 - # 10 AC and a Hot 100 "bubble under" at # 102 in the fall of 1965].

The earliest hit covered here is Softly, As I Leave You which hit # 4 AC/# 27 Hot 100 in October 1964, followed by Somewhere In Your Heart which, in January 1965, rose to the same level on the AC charts but only # 32 Hot 100.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By music fan from milton on February 11, 2006
Format: Audio CD
In 1963, the strain of wearing so many hats in the entertainment industry led Frank Sinatra to jettison one of them: he sold his controlling interest in Reprise Records, the head of a record label no longer. Part of that strain had been caused by his difficulties in generating the kind of smash hits on the singles charts that he had enjoyed during his glory years at Capitol, and of his new albums competing with Capitol dumping his back catalogue onto the market at cut-rate price.

The other impact to not just his commercial prowess, but that of everyone else in the music industry, was of course the arrival of the Beatles to the U.S. in the winter of 1964. Far more than Elvis, they changed the nature of the market, and suddenly Sinatra had to compete not simply with a generation gap as he had in the fifties, but a major realignment of purchasing habits that went across a much larger segment of all age ranges.

Enter producer Jimmy Bowen and arrangers Ernie Freeman and Billy Strange, the latter two responsible for ten of the twelve arrangements on Greatest Hits. They helped Sinatra accept and incorporate newer sounds into his instrumental palette, and it showed in the chart placings, with the modern sounds of "Strangers in the Night," "Somethin' Stupid," "That's Life," "Summer Wind," and "The World We Knew" all making the top 40, the former two both #1, during Sinatra's most impressive assaults on the charts while at Reprise, in 1966 and 1967.

No, this is not the classic Sinatra of the Capitol years, or even that of his first eight American albums on Reprise where he maintained the same approach and quality of custom in the fifties.
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