Winter Driving Best Books of the Month Valentine's Day Shop Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon King easycohice_2016 All-New Amazon Fire TV Subscribe & Save Valentine's Day Cards Amazon Gift Card Offer chiraq chiraq chiraq  Amazon Echo All-New Fire Kindle Paperwhite Shop Now SnS

Greatest Hits Volume 3

November 15, 1994 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:41
30
2
6:35
30
3
4:02
30
4
8:32
30
5
4:56
30
6
6:15
30
7
5:56
30
8
3:05
30
9
3:00
30
10
5:23
30
11
5:52
30
12
11:03
30
13
4:08
30
14
2:30
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 15, 1994
  • Release Date: November 15, 1994
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:16:58
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138CST4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 71 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #43,348 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Many of the albums Bob Dylan released in the late 70s, 80s, and early 90s were not overwhelmingly successful, and much of the really good music included on those albums has been overlooked through the years. Released in 1994, just prior to Dylan's return to prominence, this Greatest Hits Volume 3 CD boasts a number of great songs that have never gotten the credit they deserve. It's an eclectic set of songs, boasting a variety of styles, but it is pure Bob Dylan.
I'm going to examine these songs in order by release date. The oldest song included here is the classic Knockin' on Heaven's Door from Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid (1973). Planet Waves (1974) gives us Forever Young, an atypical but amazing, slow-paced, powerful Dylan song. Blood on the Tracks (1975), one of Dylan's most universally praised albums, gives us the CD's opening track, Tangled Up in Blue; this quintessential Dylan story-telling song really starts the album off with a bang. The song Hurricane from Desire (1976) is a long, incredible song about Rubin Carter, the prize-contending boxer wrongly charged with murder and imprisoned for nearly two decades in a racially charged case (a story which was dramatized in the feature film The Hurricane starring Denzel Washington in 2000)-this is one of Dylan's best songs ever. Changing of the Guards from Street Legal (1978) is a much different song, with backing vocals that give it a real gospel feel (although the lyrics make it unclear exactly what the song is about, at least to me). Next is Gotta Serve Somebody from Slow Train Coming (1979); this is a slow song that sounds a little hollow to my ears and is thus my least favorite song on the album. The 1980s are represented with five songs.
Read more ›
Comment 62 of 64 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
As a die-hard Dylan fan (I have everything he ever put out officially as well as over 100 bootlegs), I have to say, 'Greatest Hits Volume 3' is a great start if you are a Dylan fan who is new to the post-'New Morning' stuff. This collection contains just about every "hit" (I say that in quotes, because Dylan is a much better album artist than a hit single artist) he had from 1973-1991. This collection spans 1973's 'Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid' soundtrack through 1990's 'Under the Red Sky,' and includes one song from 1991's 'The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3: Rare & Unreleased 1961-1989' as well as a new remix of a previously unreleased 'Oh Mercy' (1989) outtake.

That's a brief synopsis of this disc. Now, to the review.

I'll write this in a pros and cons fashion, so you, the listener, know what you are getting and what you are missing.

PROS
- As stated above, almost every "hit" from 1973-1991 is here. 'Changing of the Guards' (from 1978's 'Street Legal'), 'Jokerman' (from 1983's classic 'Infidels'), 'Tangled Up in Blue' (from 1974's masterpiece 'Blood on the Tracks'), 'Hurricane' (from 1976's 'Desire') and 'Knockin' on Heaven's Door' (from 1973's soundtrack to 'Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid') all appear here.
- The new 1994 Brendan O'Brien remix of 'Dignity,' which is a 1989 'Oh Mercy' outtake, is great and fits perfectly here. While, if I am being honest, I prefer the original 1989 version (which appears on the 'Touched by an Angel' soundtrack) over the remix, but both are very good and are absolutely necessary if you are Dylan completist like myself.
- ALBUM TRACKS ARE HERE TOO!!! 'Brownsville Girl,' 'Silvio,' 'Series of Dreams,' and 'The Groom's Still Waiting at the Altar' all appear on this set for your pleasure.
Read more ›
6 Comments 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I'll admit something; I own no Dylan studio album between Blonde on Blonde and Love & Theft but Blood On the Tracks (which is recommended to everybody out there, BTW). That's partially because I've heard that this is Dylan's worst period, other than occasionally-praised albums (the aforementioned BOTT, Desire, Oh Mercy), and partially because I've got this little sucker.

Yeah, Tangled Up in Blue is classic Dylan, but it doesn't take long before it loses steam with Changing of the Guard. Although I do like how Changing hearkens back to the old days of streams of barely-connected images (Read: Nonsense), I hate the gospelly backup vocals--it makes the whole thing seem like overkill. The bluesy Groom's Still Waiting at the Alter is similar to Changing (that is, it makes no sense and gets hurt a lot by the backup singers), only a ton better. Then there's rightful classic Hurricane, which actually features a bit of musicall complexity--a rarity for Dylan! (Scarlet Riveria, a great violinist, does what sounds like improvisation between verses). Besides that, it's the ultimate angry Dylan protest song, which is saying something considering this guy made It's a Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall, Masters of War and It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding). I don't care if the lyrics are way off the mark, the message remains effective to this day.

Other than a bit of annoying guitar work, Forever Young is a great tune. But the jewel of the collection, and probably the reason why I bought it, is Jokerman. I was a bit leery of it when I first read about it. If you've never heard of Jokerman, it's a Dylan reggae song questioning a prophet, and white people playing reggae doesn't usually turn out that well. But Jokerman turns out to be thoroughly amazing, my favorite post-60's Dylan song.
Read more ›
Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?