Greece, the Hidden Centuries and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a $1.42
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Greece, The Hidden Centuries: Turkish Rule from the Fall of Constantinople to Greek Independence Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-1848850477 ISBN-10: 1848850476

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$39.99 $12.67

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: I. B. Tauris (May 11, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848850476
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848850477
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #927,551 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"David Brewer's book is by far the best work that I have read on the Turkokrateia, the hidden centuries when what is now Greece was under the rule of the Ottoman Turks. His book is thoroughly researched and very well written, and it opens up for the general reader a fascinating and little known era of history. Highly recommended." -- John Freely

"This is the story of seven centuries of Greek life before Greece became a modern, self-governing nation in the early nineteenth century, told for a new generation and from both the secular and religious viewpoints of the emerging nation. David Brewer writes with verve, a sharp eye for detail, and a finely balanced sense of the moral uncertainties involved in looking back into the past from the point of view of the early twenty-first century." -- Roderick Beaton, Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature, King’s College London

"Brewer’s concise, sane, and independent assessment is a fine achievement...Greece: the Hidden Centuries scores high marks for its scope, its international frame of reference, and its objectivity. Brewer is the best sort of Philhellene, seeing the Greeks for what they are and as the product of their circumstances" -- John Psaropoulos, TLS

About the Author

David Brewer is the author of The Flame of Freedom: The Greek War of Independence, 1821-1833. After studying Classics at Oxford University he divided his working life between teaching, journalism and business before dedicating himself to the study of the history of Greece.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Hank R on November 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book was written by a respected British classicist, who by his previous scholarship has established his ample credentials as a Philhellene. That he dared to take umbrage with the notion that everything which took place during the Turkokratia was bad, horrible, and hideous beyond belief is obviously anathema to the the average Greek whose notions of the period are derived from his grandmother, his church, and from Greek political thought. The truth is that there was never a one size fits all historical template when it comes to discussing life during the Ottoman years. There were good and bad sultans, good and bad pashas, resulting in good and bad treatment of an occupied people. Life, in many ways, varied from place to place and from one time period to another. And that's what David Brewer tried to point out by writing this book. I found it interesting, well written, and informative even if significant doubt was raised in my mind about the accuracy of some of his assertions.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sophia Kugeares on December 1, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The periods of Greek history omitted from the broad picture of a dynamic culture; but very important for anyone who desires to understand the links between Antiquity and Independence in 1821.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Panagiotis Kakkavas on August 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good book but there are a couple of occassions where background from questionable sources is used. Although author makes it known, I could do without them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Pen Name on April 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
You know this is an accuracy account if it has angered the oppressors. This is obvious by the Turkish response to this book. The argument that that rape and pillage for 400yrs was not a bad does not hold. Its like saying having african slaves in the usa was good for for the slaves. These are the same people who denie the Armenian holocaust.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 18 people found the following review helpful By GAA1 on March 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is simply one of the most accesable and well written books about this time period in Greece. I am greek myself and grew up on many stories about what happened during turkish rule. I think that for Greeks you have to come at this topic with a open mind otherwise you are going to be upset. If you do you will realise that the topics are discussed in a even handed manner. No one group of people is entirely right or wrong, evil or good. A lot of the information requires no knowledge of the time period but seems to be common sense. Yes, there was evidence of cruelty on the part of the Ottoman Empire but it also makes common sense that if you are ruling a large area filled with multiple ethnic groups constantly crushing them is not to your benefit. Productive people produce taxes, dead people only smell. Money runs empires.Were there greeks who were not pro-independence? Absolutely! Think of the corporation you work for, for example. When big change comes there are those who embrace it and those who are comfortable with the status quo and fight change with everything they have.One of the most intersting parts of the book is the last chapter. When the greek goverment tried to publish a school textbook with a more accurate version of history all the entrenched powers that had been given passes for questionable history ( e.g. the orthodox church, nationalists etc) were up in arms about it. The book was defended by historians as accurate but the educational minister who also defended it was voted out of office in the next election and the new one let the old innacurate history be reprinted. The fact that this book also raises such tempers may be the biggest compliment to its accuracy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0xa02bc9f0)