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83 of 91 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Grammar
I actually found this book years ago when I knew no Greek at all and was looking for grammars of the Attic dialect. I had no idea that I would one day commit myself to the understanding of the bible. It is actually through an advertisement in the back of this book that I found the whole Zondervan line, including William Mounce's fantastic introductory grammar. Now, years...
Published on January 1, 2001 by Jonathan Bailey

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31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars COULD HAVE BEEN A 5 STAR
Really 3 1/2 stars, but Amazon doesn't have that rating. I learned a lot from this
book. Wallace is very good at giving information that is easy to understand. The
fault I have & I believe that it's a serious flaw, hence the 3 1/2*, is that he puts
too much of his personal theology into the book. Whether in translating the Bible &
in teaching exegesis...
Published on January 24, 2010 by AL


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83 of 91 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Grammar, January 1, 2001
By 
This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
I actually found this book years ago when I knew no Greek at all and was looking for grammars of the Attic dialect. I had no idea that I would one day commit myself to the understanding of the bible. It is actually through an advertisement in the back of this book that I found the whole Zondervan line, including William Mounce's fantastic introductory grammar. Now, years later, as I prepare for seminary, I find that I am already equipped with most of the Greek textsbooks that I will need there.
This book is a real treasure. Long before I could read any Greek I combed over the excellent essays at the beginning about the nature of New Testament Greek and the issues of teaching and learning Greek in his "purpose of this book" essay. Also, the book is designed as a reference, giving you everything you ever wanted to know about cases in one swoop, then verbs in one swoop, etc., yet Wallace keeps the various components of the Greek language distinct from one another and is very meticulous in assuming greater knowledge from the student as one works through the book, indicating that it is designed to be methodically worked through from beginning to end in seminary courses. The result is a teaching aid that is a well-indexed reference, usable for one's entire lifetime. Also, Wallace includes a number of examples with each of his paragraphs, and each of the examples is translated from the Greek. This is a wonderful boon for someone like me who, though having started Greek 4 years ago before before learning any foreign language, has since learned to speak German and read Hebrew fluently, but never got the time to acquire great fluency in New Testament Greek. My daily biblical studies have prompted me to do many advanced word studies and pose a number of syntactical questions involving Greek, yet I have never really attained the vocabulary or fluency in the language as one who can just pick up a Greek New Testament and read it. In this respect, Wallace's clear language and numerous translated examples have helped me to no end.
I guess what I am trying to say is that this book is very user-friendly and makes a wonderful companion even to beginning students in the language, or for pastors whose Greek has gotten rusty.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Pleased User, January 27, 2001
By 
William Arnold (Stockton, California USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
Wallace's grammar is excellent! It is very thorough and very detailed, but also very understandable and readable. (If you disagree, just try reading through A. T. Robertson's grammar to compare!) It is full of illustrations and charts and contains detailed explanations and offers many examples of syntactical categories. He also discusses many debatable and exegeticaly significant passages, giving the eveidence for different positions. To make it even more useful, there is an index of subject, one of Greek words and one of biblical passages. It is by far the most user friendly advanced grammar in print. It is part of the same series as Mounce's beginning grammar. (For more reviews on similar books.....
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Text Book with an Overwhelming Amount of Information, May 11, 2009
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This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
Professor Dan Wallace's "Greek Grammar" not only furnishes an overwhelming amount of information for students, but could also easily serve as a launching pad for multitudes of scholarly work. Unlike the introductory texts that tend to have fixed rules, such as the declension endings, tense formatives or the square of stops (I'm using Mounce's terminologies here) with very few exceptions, "Greek Grammar" is an intermediate text where in some cases, there is no black and white rule of interpretation that perfectly applies to certain difficult passages of the Scripture; for example, the nuance of a train of participles in Eph 5:19-21 (p.651), whether they imply result or manner, and several other cases Wallace places under the heading of "debatable texts."

One of the most brilliant and theologically significant exegesis that I have studied in this text is the analysis of the anarthrous per-verbal predicate nominative "theos" in John 1:1 (p.256-270). Here Wallace shows that this "theos," citing the statistical analysis done by Harner and Dixon, is qualitative, not definite. So what's the big deal? It is a huge deal. An interpretation of definite theos might be the source of the error of Sabelianism or modalism. The error of treating the word as definite is a result of misapplication; the converse application to be exact, which is an invalid use of Colwell's rule. Moreover, even less excusable is the error of interpreting the word as indefinite such as what the New World translators did, that Wallace describes as more of an issue of theological bias toward Arianism (p.267). So the apostle John wasn't arbitrary when he placed an anarthrous pre-verbal predicate nominative theos in John 1:1. "The construction the evangelist chose to express this idea was the most concise way he could have stated that the Word was God and yet was distinct from the Father." (p.269).

Studying enormous amount of linguistic information could be challenging. I believe Wallace was trying to be fair in citing the academic works of many grammarians; classical and modern, as evident by so many footnotes discussing the references he cited from, before coming up with his own conclusion about his analysis on proper uses of particular topic in discussion. But while it is useful to know others' point of view, it could be confusing as well. I guess the trade-off is if Wallace is trying to be concise by only teaching what he believes to be the proper rules of interpretation without citing many references, the students will not get much exposure on both the historical background such as the classical versus Koine Greek uses as well as the past and existing research findings. I actually prefer this approach. On the contrary, Wallace seems to choose to mingle references with the materials which often causes more distractions to me; a clear example of which is when he talks about the approach adopted by Goodwin versus Gildersleeve when working with conditional sentences (p.705-709).

In addition, while doing a superb job for the majority of the text in citing many New Testament uses and explain them when claiming a certain application of a Greek part of speech, there are two sections where Wallace does not do or barely does this; when covering prepositions (p.364-389) and clauses (p.657-665) where he seems to breeze through the section without including many examples at all. A subject that I wished Wallace includes more as well is the speech act theory that has to do with the pragmatic view in exegesis as opposed to structural and semantic view. He barely touches upon this subject in conditional sentence section (p.703). I guess the speech act theory seems to be of a higher plane of exegesis beyond semantic, and is reserved for an advanced study.

Despite seemingly complicated divisions of the chapters and sections where a topic may have three or four sub-divisions, Wallace provides a double summary of everything he has covered at the end of the text. First, it is called a syntax summary that consists of the basic categories with definition but without examples. Second, it is called "cheat sheet" that consists of description of categories only; no definition and no examples; intended as a handy reference for students when doing exegesis. To use the cheat sheet, I would caution that one should know first what the categories are about. The cheat sheet is of little or no use when students are trying to determine what category an accusative they are reading falls under if they don't know or remember what double accusative means listed under "Accusative" section.

Studying this text is exhausting. It took me seven months to complete. Perhaps studying it in a classroom experience is richer and more rewarding; something that I don't have the privilege of. I wish. But one thing for sure, that though I have studied the text end-to-end, I am not done with it. My head is way too small to contain all the materials Wallace teaches. There is always a need to review and most importantly, this text is a valuable reference, a must-have for me personally, I should say, for New Testament exegesis.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a great intermediate grammar ..., October 18, 2000
By 
forehandshanker (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
The knock on Wallace has been on the number of categories he uses, and some of the examples. I think that misses the point. Read the book, and begin to extrapolate from his examples an understanding of Greek syntax. His examples are just there for illustration, and I know he would admit they are not gospel.
It is telling that Wallace was asked to serve on the committe that will produce the next revision of the standard for advanced Koine Greek grammar, Blass-DeBrunner-Funk. Get this book, and then get BDF (or AT Robertson's grammar).
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Invaluable sourcebook for advanced Greek students, July 9, 2001
By 
Daniel S. Russell "syzygy121" (Blacksburg, VA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
Any student of Koine Greek will greatly benefit from this well-written and exhaustively researched volume. Alongside your BAGD, you will find this text invaluable. Wallace not only shares his considerable knowledge gleaned over decades of teaching, but he manages to keep the content interesting and even (gasp) fun!
Affectionately known as "big green" among my seminary classmates, Wallace's advanced grammar has made our study of the GNT both easier and more complete. Kudos to Dr. Wallace on this fine work.
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31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars COULD HAVE BEEN A 5 STAR, January 24, 2010
By 
AL (Waverly, Tenn) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
Really 3 1/2 stars, but Amazon doesn't have that rating. I learned a lot from this
book. Wallace is very good at giving information that is easy to understand. The
fault I have & I believe that it's a serious flaw, hence the 3 1/2*, is that he puts
too much of his personal theology into the book. Whether in translating the Bible &
in teaching exegesis which is a close cousin to translating, the scholar should be
theologically neutral. It should be "This is what the Hebrew/Greek SAYS". One's own
theology as to what it means, should be reserved for the commentaries and the
pulpit. That's the problem I have with many Bible translations,(yes, including the
KJV in some places). That's also one of the reasons it's helpful to study Hebrew &
Greek, to understand the words of the Bible, and not just have to rely solely on
translations, however good they may be.

That said, one can still profit from this work. In this book I learned about the
Granville Sharp rule, & the real significance of the barking dog. He also deals with
the aspect-time-type of action question in the introduction to Verbal Tense. This is
a good one to grab off the shelf for information when something new comes up. This
work can serve one very well, only remember the advice of Douglas Stuart in his book
on commentaries,"just because a person is a"PhD" doesn't NECESSARILY mean that
he or she is right and you're wrong."
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars my evaluation, December 10, 2007
By 
Keith Surland (Mount airy maryland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
Reading and rereading the works on Greek grammar has been somewhat of a career for me since 1992. I first read Wallace's book in 1996-97. I have previously read at that time Robertson's large and short grammar through as well as the works of Blass, Nida and Louw, Dana and Mantey, Black, Burton and was soon to add Perschbacher and Young's work's. I have since read Wallaces's work an additional 7 times through. My copy is heavily marked and worn out. I have reread Robertson's big grammar through 4 more times as well as the other major works and have my view of Biblical Greek shaped from these great scholars who taught through their pubished works. I am very familiar with Wallace's Greek Grammar, Beyond the basics and find it one of the finest. He charted new territory in the area of the genitive case. He has brought a clear logic to the hotly debated arguement of the temporal aspect to the indicative based tenses. He argued for the traditional view with some needed modification. He also broght out some great information on the conditional clauses and the function of verbal aspect in the imperative mood. Wallace leans a little more on Blass though he does appeal to Robertson (in my opinion he does not give Robertson the credit for the source of his information as well as he should). I have to say of all the grammars that I have read I find Wallace's work on the par with Robertson. I highly reccomend that one read this book through sevral times. This book is very logical, has a keen linguistic approach, and is very level headed. There has been so much misuse of Greek grammar (not by the grammarians themeselves who's works I sighted but from commentaries that refer to the Greek) but Wallace brings sholarship and good sense to the understanding of NT Greek.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A necessity, but prepared to work!, March 27, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
This book may come as a shock to the student who turns to it fresh from first-year Greek. It is thick. It is dense. It is complicated. It is also cautious and tentative in places, pointing out that in some areas Greek grammar is either not fully understood or is undergoing re-examination. That last lesson may be worth the price of the book alone, if it brings about a proper attitude of humility in the exegete.
Although self-described as a textbook, it is difficult to read straight through. I prefer to graze short sections at a time to get acquainted with the layout and topics. Mainly I use it in conjunction with Scripture study by consulting the (very useful) index of keyed passages. The other indices, however, are cumbersome to use since the entries are not sufficiently subdivided -- you may have to turn to seven or eight pages before you find the information you need.
You haven't attained basic proficiency in NT Greek until you are broadly conversant with the subject matter of this book. Keep it next to your Greek Testament.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An important and immensely helpful book, June 11, 2000
By 
Frank W. Hughes (Alexandria, Louisiana) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
This is the reference grammar that I needed when I was in graduate school! This grammar is completely compatible with Herbert Weir Smyth's GREEK GRAMMAR (Harvard Univ. Press) and that is extremely helpful. What is unique and most praiseworthy about this book is that it gives examples for its syntactical categories, both in Greek and in English. It summarizes the scholarly controversy about verbal aspect and comes to its own conclusions in an even-handed way. This is fine book that I do not hesitate to recommend to my graduate and undergraduate students.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny how theology dictates grammatical choices, May 12, 2006
By 
This review is from: Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture, Subject, and Greek Word Indexes (Hardcover)
For better, for worse, this grammar has become a sort of gold standard in the biblical Greek realm, and deservedly so. There, to my knowledge, exists no other truly exhaustive treatment of the grammatical nuances in biblical Greek that is actually readable (I have a few dusty old tomes, such as A.T. Robertson's horribly extensive Greek grammar) on the market today.

In short, my recommendation is as follows: anyone who wants to progress beyond the first year of biblical Greek needs this work, yes, needs it. I would like to add one little bit of advice however, do not think that because Wallace is a well renowned Greek scholar, which he is, that he does not include his own theological agenda. Reading the NT in Greek is not simply a cut-and-dry process, if it were then there would only be one or two translations and there would not be the need for so many exegetical tools such as this. Most of the time the choices that Wallace makes and the distinctions that he draws are totally founded and necessary, but every now and then he will make a totally ambiguous concept seem completely cut and dry, thereby slipping in his own reading while dressing it up as "honest grammatical identification". This is not to say that this is not a top-notch work, rather just keep it in mind when engaging certain texts that are giving you a theological headache, and don't just "take his word for it".
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