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Greek Oriental Rebetica


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Audio CD, December 2, 1993
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$16.58
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$16.58 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In stock on April 2, 2015. Order it now. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Greek Oriental Rebetica + Rembetika 5-Master of Rembetika 1932-193 + Rembetika 4 Vassilis Tsisanis the Postwar Years
Price for all three: $68.21

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Editorial Reviews


1. Zmirneikos Balos (No Hope But You) - Marika Papagika
2. Gazeli Mustaar (Burned Again) - Yorghos Papasidheris
3. Aidhiniko (Instrumental) - Dhimitrios Semsis
4. Sabah Manes (Open The Graves) - Stratos Payumdzis
5. Ta Hanumakya (Hashish Harem) - Rita Abadzi
6. Susta Politiki (Constantinople, My Dreams And My Torments) - Andonis Dalgas
7. Mangiko (Lowdown Doll) - Andonis Dalgas
8. Nava Hedzaz (Like A Dry And Drifting Leaf) - Marika Kanaropulu
9. Yati Fumaro Kokaini (Why I Smoke Cocaine) - Roza Eskenazi
10. Usak-Tsifte-Teli Manes (I'm Not To Blame) - Roza Eskenazi
11. Tsifte-Telli (Instrumental) - Dhimitrios Semsis
12. Aidhinikos Horos (The Magic Fountain Of Your Eyes) - Marika Papagika
13. Gazeli Neva Sabah (The Hour Of Death) - Rita Abadzi
14. Trava Re (Manga Ke) Alani (Hipster, Hit The Road!) - Roza Eskenazi
15. Hedzaz Neva Manes (No Life Is For Me) - Haralambos Panayis
16. Tis Ksenity As O Ponos (The Exile's Grief) - Andonis Dalgas
17. Burnovaliosirto (Instrumental) - Yanis Oghdhondakis
18. Gyuzel Sabah Manes (Tell Me, Charon) - Yorghos Papasidheris
19. Ise Pondos (You're Slick) - Rita Abadzi
20. Zmirneikomanes (Bordello Blues) - Yangos Psamatyalis
See all 21 tracks on this disc

Product Details

  • Audio CD (December 2, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Arhoolie Records
  • ASIN: B0000023TB
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #108,458 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
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See all 8 customer reviews
What I liked most of this CD was it's vast repetoire of music from the various artists.
Born in Canada ...Made in Greece
I would highly recommend this recording to anyone who has an interest in Greek, Turkish, Middle Eastern, Klezmer or world music in general.
Paul Kutscera
If you have heard about rebetica and want to start investigating it, this is an excellent place to start.
Jon Corelis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Paul Kutscera on September 8, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Put simply, this is a fantastic recording. It is a fine recording of urban music of the Greek communities of Anatolia (present day Turkey) which were wiped out earlier in this century. It spans the years 1927-1932 and features the pre-eminent instrumentalists and vocalists of the era. It features artists whose music continues to influence Greek and Turkish music to this day. Not surprisingly, many of the numbers are laments for a lost love, a lost way of life or a lost homeland; however, many of the numbers are upbeat and relect the vibrancy of this lost community. A few of the songs feature Antonios Diamandithes, nicknamed "Dalgas" (Turkish, for wave) for the extraordinary ululations of his voice. He has rightly been called one of the greatest vocalists of the 20th century, and the proof is on this record. His "Ponos Tis Xenitia" is a song of the searing pain of exile. It is among the most moving, evocative songs ever recorded. I grew up listening to this type of music and this record is like a gift from heaven. Contrary to another review listed here which states that the instruments are all "Turkish" and that the music loses all it's Greek elements, nothing could be farther from the truth. These instruments can more accurately be called Anatolian or even Middle Eastern, no country or people can claim their origins, moreover, most of the virtuosoes of these instruments were Christian Greeks or Armenians. Also this "Smyrnaic" music (from the Greek city Smyrna on the coast of present day Turkey) forms the foundation of much of modern Greek music. The analogy has frequently been made that this music is to Greek and Turkish contemporary music what the blues is to American music. The allusion is very accurate in more ways than one.Read more ›
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 8, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Put simply, this is a fantastic recording. It is a fine recording of urban music of the Greek communities of Anatolia (present day Turkey) which were wiped out earlier in this century. It spans the years 1927-1932 and features the pre-eminent instrumentalists and vocalists of the era. It features artists whose music continues to influence Greek and Turkish music to this day. Not surprisingly, many of the numbers are laments for a lost love, a lost way of life or a lost homeland; however, many of the numbers are upbeat and relect the vibrancy of this lost community. A few of the songs feature Antonios Diamandithes, nicknamed "Dalgas" (Turkish, for wave) for the extraordinary ululations of his voice. He has rightly been called one of the greatest vocalists of the 20th century, and the proof is on this record. His "Ponos Tis Xenitia" is a song of the searing pain of exile. It is among the most moving, evocative songs ever recorded. I grew up listening to this type of music and this record is like a gift from heaven. Contrary to another review listed here which states that the instruments are all "Turkish" and that the music loses all it's Greek elements, nothing could be farther from the truth. These instruments can more accurately be called Anatolian or even Middle Eastern, no country or people can claim their origins, moreover, most of the virtuosoes of these instruments were Christian Greeks or Armenians. Also this "Smyrnaic" music (from the Greek city Smyrna on the coast of present day Turkey) forms the foundation of much of modern Greek music. The analogy has frequently been made that this music is to Greek and Turkish contemporary music what the blues is to American music. The allusion is very accurate in more ways than one.Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 15, 2000
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Do your roots reach back to Asia Minor? Did you hear the stories from your grandparents about their flight from the old country? Yes? Then you're primed for this outstanding CD! The loving passion of these artists will allow you to experience the emotions your grandparents felt when they listened, and sang, to these folk classics. And I mean passion!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Debra Jan Bibel TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 31, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Selected from the old 78 rpm collection of Professor Martin Schwartz (University of California at Berkeley), with his notes and commentaries, this album remains the best introduction to the history and form of rebetika [or rembetica], the music of the immigrant Greek population from Turkey, mainly from Smyrna [Izmir today]. When after World War I the Ottoman Empire was broken up and Turkey became a smaller, independent nation, the Greek minority with their Asian-influenced music and ways came to Greece. They were not particularly welcomed. Songs arising from this lower socio-economic community concerned life in cafes and taverns, hashish dens, cocaine use, gambling, gangsters and prison, brothels, death, romance, and grief. The music itself often followed Turko-Persian modes but had influences from lands bordering the Black Sea, particularly the Balkans and Jewish communities.(Roza Eskensazi, one of the stars of rebetika, was Jewish.) Instruments were initially Turkish and Arabic, such as the oud and kanoun, though these recordings featured mainly violin and sometimes cello, guitar, lyre and lauto. Singing style is Middle Eastern, as with ghazals. Do not expect high fidelity from these recordings from 1911 to 1937. This album is essentially an archive and window into times past. Indeed, very few modern rebetika albums are available, such as that from the Seattle-based group Pasatempo and also Ross Daly and Niki Tramba. This is a shame, as the melancholic music, often referred to as Greek blues, is varied, sophisticated, and enjoyable. It did influence the development of modern Greek art songs, entechno laiko. From this introduction, the listener may further explore similar anthologies of rebetika music from around the 1930s.
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