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Green Arrow Vol. 1: The Midas Touch (The New 52) Paperback – June 5, 2012


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Green Arrow Vol. 1: The Midas Touch (The New 52) + Green Arrow Vol. 2: Triple Threat (The New 52) + Green Arrow Vol. 3: Harrow (The New 52) (Green Arrow (Graphic Novels))
Price for all three: $35.21

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Product Details

  • Series: Green Arrow (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (June 5, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401234860
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401234867
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 6.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #41,073 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A perfect example of a sharply written, and sophisticated, superhero title.” – Complex Magazine 

About the Author

J.T. Krul is an American comic book writer whose first comic work was at Marvel Comics, writing X-men Unlimited. He has since made quite a name for himself in the comic industry, writing the majority of books at Aspen MLT including Fathom. His recent projects include Captain Atom, Green Arrow, Teen Titans, Blackest Night: Titans, Titans, Justice League: Rise And Fall for DC Comics.

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Customer Reviews

I had hoped to like this book, but I just couldn't.
N. Beitler
Not entirely a bad story, no plot holes but little to no character development and uninspiring writing.
Skyler Sneathen
The same cannot be said for Green Arrow: The Midas Touch.
Romie Rome

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By N. Durham HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on June 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
Of all the DC characters to get rebooted in the New 52, I kind of looked forward to seeing something new done with Green Arrow, especially with JT Krul at the helm. I've always liked Krul, regardless of whatever flack he's gotten over the past couple years, and I always dug his take on Green Arrow too. Sadly though, this new take on the character leaves a lot to be desired. It's just so unbelievably boring and banal. This new take on Ollie Queen finds him as not being a man of the people (yet) and instead as the head of Queen Industries. He takes on a group of sadistic, super-powered baddies, yadda-yadda-yadda. There just isn't a whole lot to admire here, ranging from the cruddy dialogue to the stiff looking artwork (that features George Perez on inks) to the new look of Green Arrow, which looks like the Justin Hartley-played version from Smallville. Call me old fashioned, but I kind of miss the Robin Hood look. Anyway, The Midas Touch is a disappointing new direction for Green Arrow, but hey, after this, there's really nowhere to really go but up...right? Let's hope so.
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30 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Onionavenger on June 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoy Green Arrow. Mike Grell helped me learn all about Oliver Queen first in Long Bow Hunters and then in his 80 issue run on the title. Then, I enjoyed learning more about Oliver reading Green Arrow: Year One and then reading the Kevin Smith books. I next went back and got the Green Arrow/Green Lantern books from the 70's.

If you like ANY of these Green Arrow stories and the wonderful character of Oliver Queen that was developed in them, run run RUN away from Green Arrow: The Midas Touch as fast as you can.

The book has a younger Oliver Queen running around with a bunch of high-tech gadgets and his own li'l version of Oracle helping him out. In fact, he's got a whole team talking in his ear as he fights crime. And, he's fighting outlandish supervillians here.

Dinah/Black Canary is nowhere to be found. Green Arrow's facial hair is nowhere to be found. In fact, there's really nothing here that remotely resembles the Green Arrow that we all grew up with and enjoyed. Instead, we have a early 20's hip Green Arrow with a high-tech bow that folds up into a tiny little thing that fits in his hand. It's silly, it's goofy, and it's just not Green Arrow.

It makes me sad, because I really love most of the New 52 and I hate that this is the Oliver Queen that I have to deal with inhabitting the new DC Universe.

Honestly, if you've ever been a Green Arrow fan over the years, make sure to avoid this like the plague.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By RL on June 30, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The first half of this story had the potential to be really good stuff. The plot, poking as it does at celebutantes, and reality shows,, could have been relevant, intelligent, and action packed all in one. In practice, it shows little interest in anything but the action part of the equation, and it keeps the story fairly generic stuff. I mean seriously, we don't even have an old-fashioned moment of self doubt with Ollie realizing he might have something in common with these thrill-seeking rich kids(at least, I think they're supposed to be rich kids. The origins of these guys are really only mentioned in detail on the back cover description- another flaw in the writing).

Not that it really matters, because this set of bad guys is quickly wrapped up in favor of a mysterious pair of other crooks that have....well, some kind of connection to Ollie. Who knows? who cares? If the missed chances in the first half hadn't scared me off the book, the flat dud of the second would have.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Romie Rome on June 13, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After reading each Vol. 1 of DC's New 52 versions of Justice League and Batman, I was anxious to pick up another title. Choosing this one was a mistake. It was horribly underwhelming. The other New 52 titles I have picked up have been fresh, new, and exciting, with exceptional artwork. The same cannot be said for Green Arrow: The Midas Touch. The story line is incredibly dull and the artwork, as mentioned by a previous reviewer, has a very "stiff" feeling to it, meaning the action is not portrayed very effectively.

Final word: Save your money (or buy something else).
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By tvtv3 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 31, 2012
Format: Paperback
Even though I enjoy the character of Green Arrow, I can't say I've really been a big fan of Oliver Queen and his Green Arrow disguise. A lot of what I originally know and read of Green Lantern came from the 1970s team up of Green Arrow and Green Lantern as they traversed the good ole' U.S.A. bringing down criminals and starting a personal war on drugs. Despite not being as familiar with the character as I am with Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, and Flash, I have always liked Green Arrow.

Like all of the DC characters, Green Arrow has gotten a complete reboot with the New 52. GREEN ARROW, VOL. 1: THE MIDAS TOUCH collects the first six issues of the new Green Arrow. At the start of the series, Green Arrow is already established as Oliver Queen's night time vigilante alter-ego. Stealing a page from the Christopher Nolan Batman movies, he's been fighting crime for a long time now and uses a division of his own company to research and fund his crime fighting. The first part of THE MIDAS TOUCH storyline has Queen facing off against a gang of street thugs who record all of their criminal activities and post them to cyberspace. They aren't all that difficult to fight, but the general premise is an interesting one. What begins as a subplot but then becomes the main focus of this volume is Green Arrow's confrontation between a decomposing monster of rotting flesh that calls himself Midas and his lady love, an assassin named Blood Rose who has a personal vendetta against Oliver Queen.

As far as comic stories go, GREEN ARROW, VOL. 1: THE MIDAS TOUCH is average. Queen/Green Arrow are likeable enough, but too much of his character seems copied from more updated versions of Batman. Green Arrow and Batman share somewhat similar backgrounds, but the characters are not alike.
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