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Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J.

November 25, 1984 | Format: MP3

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5:03
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5:20
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 25, 1984
  • Release Date: November 25, 1984
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 36:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138KN3C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (93 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,715 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

In retrospect, this is not Bruce's best work, but it's still really good stuff.
R. Kyle
While not as good as his next release, this album is a definite buy for any Springsteen fan or even a Dylan fan looking for some new tunes.
Jeff
Have you ever heard the song "For You", this album is absolutely amazing.
Brian

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Jessica L on November 9, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I am a brand new, 19-year-old Bruce fan. I have just finished reading the rest of the reviews and I am confused. A good friend of mine gave me two of Bruce's cd's to start off with: "Greetings..." and "The Wild..." I'd never heard Bruce before, and I was completely astonished when I heard it. Bruce Springsteen is absolutely incredible. I listened to it nonstop for a month, and easily picked out what I considered to be the best. On "Greetings", two of my favorites were "Mary, Queen of Arkansas" and "The Angel", second only to "Lost in the Flood." I don't understand why all the reviews seem to cast those as the weakest points of the album. What struck me about Bruce was his compassion, intensity, and the forcefulness of his poetic, melancholic yet youthful sincerity. I find those qualities most in the songs that everyone else finds lacking. I am now at the complete mercy of Bruce's romantic, expressive genius and I will faithfully stick by that side of him. I hope I'm not the only one who appreciates these masterpieces.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Jeff on January 21, 2001
Format: Audio CD
This CD presents a young and interesting Bruce Springsteen, performing songs with an early version of the E Street Band. Despite the fact that The Wild, The Innocent...would be released later that year, this album is very different than that album. This album has more Dylan-esque tendencies than that release, revealed on songs like "Does This Bus Stop At 82nd Street?," "Mary, Queen of Arkansas," and "Growin' Up." These songs, more acoustic in nature than later Springsteen (except Nebraska and Tom Joad), are a welcome change of pace from later, rock oriented Springsteen. Along with those two tunes, this album also includes the fabulous(to say the least) rocker "For You" and the moody "Spirit In The Night," a radio favorite. Although many casual fans consider "Spirit In The Night" to be the pinnacle of early Springsteen, it is not even the best song on the album, as it is easily rivaled by "It's Hard To Be A Saint In the City," "Lost In The Flood," and "For You." "Blinded By The Light," the opening number, has a great funky feel to it, with some interesting, stream-of-conciousness-lyrics. Even the oft-forgotten "Mary..." has some great, sensitive lyrics. While not as good as his next release, this album is a definite buy for any Springsteen fan or even a Dylan fan looking for some new tunes.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Michael R. Ciampi on December 3, 1999
Format: Audio CD
We all know Born to Run and The River and these are great albums. But if you love Bruce, this is the one you must have! It was his first studio album and the best he ever put out. The lyrics in these songs brings you through his painful, drug fenzied, lonely, and sexy moments from his early life. For You is probaly his best and most underrated tune. It will give you goosebumps when he screams out "and who am I to ask you to lick my sores..." Spirit in the Night and Blinded by the Light are the best known hits from this record. Growing Up is the rebel's anthem and The Flood will rip your heart out. So if you are a Bruce fan you must add this to your collection. But understand, this is not Born in the USA or Tunnel of LoveIt is wild, young, and raw!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Soulboogiealex on May 2, 2006
Format: Audio CD
1972 was the year a young kid from New Jersey was discovered by John Hammond sr. Springsteen had been in various bands by then. He did some recordings for his first the Castilles and Steel Mill, none of which got any serious circulation or is available today. At the time of his discovery Springsteen had retreated in the coffee house circuit to focus on his songwriting. Being a scruffy looking kid with an acoustic guitar, Hammond mistook him for the new Bob Dylan. Springsteen himself wasn't so sure which direction his career should take. It wasn't halfway till through the sessions that Hammond discovered Springsteen was a mean electric guitarist as well and an early E-Street band was hastily assembled. The haste and uncertainty shows on the record. The end result is an elective affair of rock, soul, jazz and folk, a mixed blessing.

At the time Springsteen wasn't yet the troubadour of the working class he'd become a few years down the line. Asbury's dense lyrics dealt with growing up in Asbury, dreams of making it in music and city life. The colorful characters Springsteen portraits he'd meet on the Jersey Shore and were often highly romanticized.

On Asbury Springsteen offers us an opportunity to grow up with him. "I stood stone-like at midnight suspended in my masquerade, I combed my hair till it was just right and commanded the night brigade" he sings as he gets ready to hit the Jersey night. "I came for you, for you, I came for you, but you did not need my urgency, I came for you, for you, I came for you, but your life was one long emergency" he moans at young and unrequited love. "By the time we made it up to Greasy Lake I had my head out the window and Janey's fingers were in the cake, I think I really dug her 'cause I was too loose to fake, I said, "I'm hurt.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John Miele on June 6, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Bruce Springsteen was often called the new Bob Dylan during his early career, and Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ is the prime reason why. Those who called him the new Dylan pointed to Springsteen's imagery and stream-of-consciousness lyrics, which resembled Highway 61 Revisited-era tunes.

But Greetings is a whole different beast entirely. It certainly owes a debt to Dylan lyrically, but musically it's more expansive. It sure ain't Born to Run, but you can feel the fire growing, and there are some definite classics here: "Blinded by the Light," (later covered poorly by Manfred Mann) "Growin' Up," (my personal favorite) "Lost in the Flood," and "Spirit in the Night" are all great, great songs from a hungry young talent. And the rest is awfully good, too. Springsteen is a bit more optimistic here; even when he gets downbeat, there is an overall excitement to the album that keeps it from being overly depressing.

Considering where Springsteen was headed, this is rather surprising. In fact, one could hardly guess that in less than a decade, he would release the barebones (but brilliant) Nebraska. It's an exciting, exhilirating album that could easily be ranked among the best debuts ever (including Led Zeppelin, Please Please Me, Crosby, Stills, and Nash, and whatever else you have to throw at it). There's no doubt that Bruce would improve on the elements that make Greetings an undeniable success. Indeed, The Wild, the Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle, released the following year, shows impressive lyrical and musical expansion. But there's something so youthful and breathtaking about this album that it remains a wholly unique gem in Springsteen's catalog, and as good an album as any to start listening to him.
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