Grey's Anatomy: Season 3
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on August 31, 2007
I'm disturbed to see how negative people are giving the reviews of season 3. Granted, they could have done more in depth with the relationships, but I think they have a purpose. I think they want the show to last as long as the contract they have with ABC and then some, but if everything were to go perfect, the show would get dull. I believe this season, the theme was that fairytales don't always have a happy-ending. That life isn't going to be perfect and things aren't going to work out just because you hope it does. There was a lot of miscommunication or not at all. Perhaps Season 4 will change things up a bit.

Don't look too much in the reviews, I love watching the show, whether if it's not to my wanting meredith/derek together. I love the chemistry between them, the storylines, and the cases they have. If you love the show, don't dismiss this just because of the negative reviews.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on September 30, 2007
*Possible spoilers within.*

Oh, how the mighty have fallen. Last week, the season premiere of "C.S.I." trumped the premiere of "Grey's Anatomy"'s fourth season by a significant margin. That's because "Grey's Anatomy," a series which once shined so vibrantly, has been reduced to a dull glimmer. Throughout the series' first two seasons, it seemed incredible that a show could maintain such a level of greatness and be so addictive without going off the tracks every once in a while.

But come Season Three, the show did crash. Big time.

Truth be told, Season Three wasn't as bad as some will lead you to believe. The first half of the season was uniformly great. It wasn't until the midpoint, during an arc involving a ferry boat crash, that, ironically, the show crashed as well. In a painfully obvious attempt to garner higher ratings, the writers decided to have Meredith "die." Creator Shonda Rhimes is a big fan of Joss Whedon's "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"; one can only surmise that Ms. Rhimes thought she could handle character deaths as gracefully as Whedon. (She couldn't, but in her defense, not many can.) Instead, Meredith's near-death experience - complete with visions of the afterlife, highlighted by the reappearance of Jeffrey Dean Morgan as the irresistible Denny Duquette - seems entirely unnecessary. The actors' straight-faced performances during that storyline just makes the whole thing more hilarious. Re-watching the episodes, it's apparent that the writers realized their mistakes after having made them, but were left with no choice but to make the best of them. One would expect them to deal with whatever problems they've created and then keep moving on. Instead, they took one enormous mis-step after another. The biggest of these, perhaps even surpassing the idea to "kill" Meredith, was the decision to make Izzie (Katherine Heigl) sleep with George (T.R. Knight). The result was the most unbearably grotesque "romance" of the year, an inconceivable concept made all the more nonsensical by the fact that, only a few episodes before, George had suddenly married Callie (Sara Ramirez).

On top of the seemingly ceaseless crimes being committed by the writers, the second part of the season was overshadowed by the infamous conflict between leads Isaiah Washington and Patrick Dempsey, in which Washington heatedly called T.R. Knight a homosexual slur. The incident was blown way out of proportion by a bloodthirsty media, bringing Washington's slur to the forefront and trying to bury his repeated subsequent apologies, which they did quite well. Unfortunately, Rhimes decided that this was worth dismissing Washington from the series, and so, in the uncharacteristically disappointing season finale, Burke just ups and leaves, during the middle of his wedding to Christina (Sandra Oh). It was a terrible, terrible, incredibly foolish waste of one of the series' most interesting characters and most charismatic actors, and a perfectly wretched finish (hopefully) to a number of wretched mistakes.

The season wasn't all bad, though. The pre-ferry half was actually excellent. The writers came up with typically fascinating developments and very amusing scenarios. One could sense, however, that they were feeling the pressure of being the most-watched show on television after two phenomenal seasons. There was noticeably more drama and less comedy. Before deciding to pseudo-kill Meredith, the writers concocted a number of interesting twists, the majority revolving around Mark Sloan (the inimitable Eric Dane), who joined the regular cast at the start of the season. That was an obvious and very smart move on the producers' part, because Dane added just the extra spark the season needed. Sloan's presence resulted in some major (and delicious) character development for Alex Karev (Justin Chambers). Karev had previously been the show's "bad boy," but with Dane filling his shoes (and needing an even bigger pair), Karev gradually evolved into not just a decent guy, but a caring, honorable, and very likable one, though he held on to enough of his hard edge to remain Alex Karev. Karev was also given two of the season's most interesting storylines: a brief and lighthearted romance with Addison (Kate Walsh), as well as the "Jane Doe" storyline, in which Karev discovers a pregnant woman deformed and amnesiac from the ferry crash.

At the season's end, one is left exasperated, exhausted, frustrated, and bewildered, but not entirely unsatisfied. As a whole, the season is evenly great and bad, but even when it's bad, "Grey's Anatomy" is better than most series. The writers made a lot of mistakes toward the end of the season, and they'll have a hard time clearing them up during Season Four. It's uncertain whether the series will ever be as stunning as it was during Seasons One and Two, but if one can look past the misguided writing in Season Three, it's clear that the show still has what it needs to be great. Here's hoping the good doctors at Seattle Grace can put the show back together again.
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59 of 77 people found the following review helpful
Warning! Spoilers!

I love Grey's Anatomy, I am completely addicted. I think Shonda Rhimes has created an amazing and enthralling show. But, this season I was not as drawn in as in the other two. I no longer raced to get home after class to watch the episodes; they just stayed on my Tivo for days.

All the characters were on a downward spiral. Relationships were stretched to what could be a point of no return. Characters became needier, more damaged. Some characters shined. I loved Addison's character even more. We all hated Addison at the beginning of the second season. But, we grew to love her for her fighting spirit and for being so honest. I also love Callie. She is such a feisty Latina. She is strong, willful and so damn vulnerable in the area of love. (George, how dare you!) As a Hispanic, I appreciate that she was not typecast as a poor struggling Hispanic trying to make it through school to prove she has "made it in America". Instead, she is, as we recently learned, she grew up wealthy and George's part of the hotel "rent" was the tip she gave the hotel staff. That scene was very funny. I admire that Shonda Rhimes has refused to typecast minorities, or for that matter, the majority. As she so vividly portrays, race, religion or cultural background should have no place in love or career advancement. Burke and Christina made a phenomenal interracial couple and yet their race was never an impediment in their relationship. Rather, their lively competition and variety of quirks played an important role in how they carried their relationship.

Some couples were formed and some were broken this season. I think that Addison and Alex were never given a real chance. They could have been a great and interesting couple. Izzie and George were pathetic (again, poor Callie). I do not like this pairing as a couple, they were great friends. I would like to see them end as a romantic relationship and try to move back to the friendship they used to have. I like Callie and I love the job Sara Ramírez has done with the character of Callie. Callie is one of the few characters that have not become completely pathetic.

Meredith entered an even more self destructive collision course with life. She does not feel that she is worthy of love. In her own words, she considers herself as "damaged". I feel for her. Her character has taken quite a beating. McDreamy leaves her in Season 2 for Addison, she feels her mom never loved her and her father was never a presence in her life. The only person who has truly tried to create a relationship with Meredith, that was not a total fiasco, was her step-mother. Meredith was finally able to start trusting and maybe even relying on someone. Yet, when she dies, her father blames and hits her. Meredith's spirit is just broken, no wonder she did not want to fight her way out of the freezing water. Can we blame her? Derek has not been as supportive as he should be; after all, he is at least partly responsible for the state she is in. The strong, slightly vulnerable but just as playful McDreamy was nowhere to be found. Thank God for McSteamy, just watching him was enough to make my day.

George doesn't even know what he wants. He married Callie and then sleeps with Izzie. I hate this pairing. Burke? He just couldn't deal with being number 1 in Christina's life, with not being in her every thought.

I hated the episode in which Addison went to CA, it was not good at all. I am a fan of Judging Amy, and I was looking forward to watching Amy Brenneman. Yet, this episode seems a little goofy, crazy and as if the writers had been reading Nietzsche while high on LSD. The characters were not engaging, their problems were not captivating and neither were their crazy personnas. Addison was acting in a way I had never seen her before. She seemed a little crazy, more out of control. Where was the assertive, yet vulnerable, Addison?

The plots of several episodes seemed forced and overly dramaticized (they were grasping for a plot in the storyline after Meredith's drowning). The plots also seem hurried and were not allowed to develop. I suggest that they should spend a little more time writing and editing these episodes. The writers may say that the characters have a life of their own but the writers are holding the pen! So pull them in and give them something worth fighting and living for.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on August 16, 2007
I became interested in this show because I just happened to catch the "code black" episodes and the finale of season two. I didn't become a fan until after watching both the first and second seasons on dvd and by then, the show was about a month or so into the third season. I watched faithfully almost every week (even the repeats), but this season was much different from the last two.

Part of the reason that I loved Grey's Anatomy so much was that it was able to make me laugh, cry, and think, especially about the relationships in my own life. Unfortunately there isn't a lot to laugh about in season three. I don't recall any particularly inspiring moments either. The show has become a soap opera. A very well written and acted out soap, but it is what it is. In addition to that, the fact that some of our most beloved characters either won't be (or appear to not be) returning, and the whole Isaiah Washington business that no one would just let blow over have soured me towards the show even more.

I'm sure there will be a lot of new faces next season, but I haven't yet decided if I'll continue to be one of the faithful.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on September 16, 2007
Okay, so I, like many other people, believe that Grey's Anatomy Season 3 had some problems, or rather...strange plot twists. For example, George's sudden Vegas marriage, the Gizzie-gate, and the Ferry arc.

After rewatching almost all of this season (I've watched up to "The Other Side Of This Life" I realized that taken once a week with brief hiatuses between four and five episode blocks just doesn't work. It's erratic and everything seems to move a lot slower, not to mention a lot seems out of nowhere. Yet, watching these episodes one after another reawakened my original love at its basest form for Season 3.

In my eyes, Season 3 has 3 arcs: One that goes from "Time Has Come Today" to "Six Days". This deals with Meredith/Derek/Finn and then Meredith/Derek/Mark and Addison/Mark and Callie/George and Izzie dealing with the loss of Denny. The second arc seems to be "Great Expectations" up to "Some Kind of Miracle" which, as many know, is the last episode of the ferry arc. A lot of people saw this as the beginning of a whole separate arc but story-wise this just concludes a hell of a lot that had been boiling (including Meredith's mother). The third arc, consisting of "Scars and Souvenirs" up to "Didn't We Almost Have It All?" starts off drastically different. It has a different feel then almost everything we've seen all season. It mentions what happened with the ferry and the water but other then that we move on. That is, onto a whole new storyline dealing with infidelity and relationship doubts all around as well as Jane Doe.

I appreciated this season so much more without commercials and mostly without interruptions. I, somehow, even saw George and Izzie coming (even from back in the Season 2 episode, "The Name of the Game") but that means that Shonda didn't completely pull the rug out from under us. And on this rewatch I find myself pulling for George and Izzie...weird, right?

Seeing it all in one block is like putting a jig-saw puzzle together, quickly, instead of taking the time to find the missing pieces all over your house, to use that metaphor. And yes, Grey's Anatomy has a much more clear direction, style, just...everything.

So, on the television, Grey's Anatomy Season 3 was very static and bi-polar at times. On DVD it's level-headed and checking out of that psych ward.

5 stars, seriously.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on August 14, 2007
Grey's Anatomy used to be my favourite show.. Intelligent dialog, witty storylines, interesting characters - all of this got ruined in season three.
Instead of interactions between humans we get near death experience, ghosts and lots of gore. For me personally, one of the show's strengths used to be its concentration on individual characters - in season three I was treated to a boat disaster claiming tons of casualties.. More and bigger is not always better. After that came Gizzie..
I hope the show is going to return to its former self in season four, as its creator recently promised in one of interviews. Until I am sure it is so, season three DVD box is going to stay in Amazon's warehouse.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on August 30, 2007
I loved season 1 and 2, but 3 got to be very soap opera like. Characters began doing things totally "out of character." I'm disappointed with the lack of character development with Dr. Shepard and think it is awful they had to get rid of Dr. Burke, given that he was one of the more interesting and dynamic characters.
Having said that, I still gave it 4 stars becuase most episodes did make me teary eyed, or flat out cry and gave me something interesting to think about. I will watch season 4 with high hopes.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on September 19, 2007
I had watched Seasons 1 and 2 of "Grey's Anatomy" on DVD, and fully intended to watch Season 3 as it unfolded on TV. Three or four episodes in, I gave up -- the commercials made the shows drag, and the episodes seemed to lose momentum from week to week. However, I quickly completed the 3rd season on DVD, and I can honestly say the ability to watch one after the other (without commercial breaks) is a vastly rewarding experience. What might have seemed intolerable on TV (such as Izzie's moping at the beginning of the season) doesn't seem as drawn out when watched in succession. I find the show to be truly gripping television, but only when watched on DVD.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 2008
I'm "McObsessed" with this show - it is great! I didn't watch it on TV; the first time I saw it was after the 2nd season when a friend convinced me I was missing out. She was SO right! Now I make my friends watch it :) It's funny, smart, & dramatic all at once. The writing is fantastic, and the acting is superb. It certainly revived Patrick Dempsey's career! Sandra Oh steals practically every scene she's in. And Ellen Pompeo plays "Meredith" right on. Katherine Heigl also is great (I don't think she is as outstanding as other cast members; she seems to get the awards though). The ONLY thing I didn't like about this season was the back and forth AGAIN with Meredith and McDreamy, especially at the end of the season. It's starting to get a bit tiresome.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 8, 2007
I've watched Grey's since the beginnig, and loved it instantly. By the end of season 2, I found myself hating Meredith, and getting bored with the show in general. Enter season 3. Everything changed. I loved it even more than before! and I even found myself liking Meredith again! lol.
Looking forward to watching all thes eps again and it will be my fave show when the new seasons of tv start up again!

SERIOUSLY!
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