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Grow Great Grub: Organic Food from Small Spaces Paperback – February 2, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Clarkson Potter; 1 Original edition (February 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307452018
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307452016
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #102,511 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Recipe from Grow Great Grub: Root Vegetable Fries

Ingredients:
1 large carrot
1 large potato
1 large sweet potato
1 large beet
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
Salt and pepper

Roasted potatoes are good and all, but a roasted root vegetable medley is just as easy to make and a little bit fancy, too. Substitute any root vegetable, including starchy potatoes, turnip, parsnip, celery root, or rutabaga. While the veggies are roasting, toss a garlic bulb or two into the pan at about the 30-minute mark--the result: easy, creamy garlic! Yum.

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Cut the vegetables into 1/2"-wide spears and toss in a roasting pan with olive oil and herbs to coat. Keep the peels on; that’s where the vitamins are.

2. Roast for approximately 40 minutes, turning regularly until all sides have turned a golden brown and the fries are cooked straight through.

Serves 2–4



Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Root Vegetable Fries
 
Roasted potatoes are good and all, but a roasted root vegetable medley is just as easy to make and a little bit fancy too. Substitute any root vegetable, including starchy potatoes, turnip, parsnip, celery root, or rutabaga. While the veggies are roasting, toss a garlic bulb or two into the pan at about the 30-minute mark—the result: easy, creamy garlic! Yum.
 
1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Cut the vegetables into 1⁄2"-wide spears and toss in a roasting pan with olive oil and herbs to coat. Keep the peels on; that’s where the vitamins are.
2. Roast for approximately 40 minutes, turning regularly until all sides have turned a golden brown and the fries are cooked straight through.
 
Serves 2–4

More About the Author

Gayla Trail is a writer, photographer, and graphic designer with a background in the Fine Arts, cultural criticism, and ecology. She is the creator of the popular gardening project, YouGrowGirl.com and the author of three books on gardening: You Grow Girl: The Groundbreaking Guide to Gardening, Grow Great Grub: Organic Food from Small Spaces, and "Easy Growing: Organic Herbs and Edible Flowers from Small Spaces as well as an in-demand gardening personality and spokesperson with a focus on urban gardening, growing food, sustainable living, and community. Her work as a writer and photographer has appeared in the New York Times; O, the Oprah Magazine; ReadyMade; Domino; Budget Living; and more.

Gayla's love for gardening began with parsley seeds planted in a Styrofoam cup when she was five years old. Inspired by the potato plants her grandmother grew in a bucket on her senior centre's fire escape, Gayla has always gardened in whatever space she had available, including a hot and exposed building rooftop, a community plot, windowsills, shared yard space, fire escapes, a concrete parking pad, stoop steps, and a small urban backyard.

Customer Reviews

This book is an easy to read, fun, and informative book.
L. O'Rourke
If you can only purchase one book about gardening this year... make it this one!
Brenda N.
If you are a garden enthusiast (large or small), I highly recommend this book.
C. B. St Hilaire

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

241 of 242 people found the following review helpful By Bold Consumer TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 7, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought "Grow Great Grub" because I got so much out of "You Grow Girl". I really didn't see how the author could come up with that much excellent material again, but she did.

You probably should stop reading and just buy the book. The quality is excellent. Photographs are beautiful. The book is easy to read and doesn't waste time. Well done!

Pictures of what vegetables are supposed to look like always help. I'm always turning to my neighbor and asking, "Did I plant that or is it a weed?" Usually the neighbor says it's a weed, but I'm never sure.

The text covers harvesting, drying, preserving, and storing, only one of which I want to do, harvesting, but the other topics are beautifully covered for those who are ready. I'm pushing my luck just to grow and harvest a plant from seed. Maybe next year I'll preserve and store.

She lists plants that grow well in depleted soil, shady or very hot spots and makes coverage interesting on topics of nutrients, fertilizers, containers, pests, building self-watering planter boxes cheaper than buying, a great idea.

I learned about heat-loving spinach I was already growing, but had no idea what it needed! Lists of recommended varieties of vegetables and those that work well in containers are especially helpful.

Now I know when to harvest vegetables, something that always baffled me, including when to dig up onions, when to stop watering, and hang them to cure, and when my radishes were ready to harvest, unfortunately I didn't learn that in time for the current crop, how radishes can be used as a pest repellent for squash, that carrots are slow to germinate but ready to eat at any size, and when potatoes are ready to harvest. I had been about to pull mine out to check. I'm glad I didn't.
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277 of 294 people found the following review helpful By Caroline on March 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
So you're like me: you have a small, but comfortable apartment and you want to have some greenery to spruce things up. A practical soul, you don't just want flowers. You want to be able to grow your own herbs and vegetables, and look forward to your windows popping with color in the summer. But this is your first real foray into the world of container gardening.

This book is not your bible.

While it is beautifully composed, and contains a helpful chapter about canning, there is a distinct lack of real facts and procedures. In short: this is an impratical book. Questions about drainage, how to compose your garden, or how to trellis are barely answered. While the sections on individual produce to grow are inticing, they lack the information you need to really make a go at things. This book can be a good starter, but only when complemented with other, more in depth books, and a good gardening center that can guide you through the practical steps.

As an alternatives, try McGee and Stuckey's The Bountiful Container. Less pretty picture, but far more useful information.
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55 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Karen Walrond on February 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
When you first open this book, you'll notice it's beautiful. Seriously beautiful. The photographs are vivid, and the layout is really extraordinary. But then once you get past that, you start to realize it is crammed full of all kinds of information that would be helpful to both the novice gardener and the serious food-grower.

A really, really exemplary sophomore effort by Trail. Run-do-not-walk to buy this great work.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Susan R. Morris on March 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a great book, especially for the beginning gardener. I blog about gardening and am always getting questions about composting, how to start seeds, how to build good soil, etc. I will start recommending this book to my beginning gardener readers! Its explains easily and simply how to do so many gardening tasks from building a raised bed to composting. It's the perfect books for someone getting started because it doesn't get bogged down with too much information and isn't overwhelming. It promoted gardening as easy and fun (which it is).

Gardening is a learning process, we learn as we go. It's not necessary to know everything there is to know before setting off. This book does a fantastic job and giving a great overview with enough information and inspiration to get people interesting in growing food. Some beginners may find they need more in depth information than is presented in this book, especially about specific topics, but a book can't cover everything in such depth. There are many books for each specific area of gardening that can be read if you need more information about any particular topic, like composting, seed starting, or growing garlic.

The best part of this book is the photos. Photos are definitely something that engages people and draws them into the beauty of gardening, especially growing food. I find books like this easy to read and a joy to look through. The photos are definitely an inspiration and serve their purpose to encourage people to Grow Great Grub in their small spaces! It's an inspiration to me to keep documenting my garden through photos on my blog.

This book is not just for the beginning gardener.
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